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Dynamite: The Story of Class Violence in America

by Louis Adamic

Other authors: Jon Bekken (Foreword)

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1542180,544 (4.25)None
"Dynamite harkens back to an era of American capitalism a little less glossy, a little bloodier, and with striking parallels to today."--Feminist Review Labor disputes have produced more violence over a longer period of time in the United States than in any other industrialized country in the world. From the 1890s to the 1930s, hardly a year passed without a serious--and often deadly--clash between workers and management. Written in the 1930s, and with a new introduction by Mike Davis,Dynamite recounts a fascinating and largely forgotten history of class and labor struggle in America's industrial beginnings. It is the story of brutal exploitation, massacres, and judicial murders of the workers. It is also the story of their response: when peaceful strikes yielded no results, workers fought back by any means necessary. Louis Adamic has written the classic story of labor conflict in America, detailing many episodes of labor violence, including the Molly Maguires, the Homestead Strike, Pullman Strike, Colorado Labor Wars, theLos Angeles Times bombing, as well as the case of Sacco and Vanzetti. Louis Adamic emigrated from Slovenia when he was fifteen years old and quickly joined the American labor force. The author of eleven books, he is now recognized as a great figure in early twentieth-century American literature. He was found shot to death in a burning farmhouse in 1954. Introduction by Jon Bekken, co-author ofThe Industrial Workers of the World: Its First Hundred Years, 1905-2005 and co-editor ofAnarcho-Syndicalist Review.… (more)
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Sisällysluettelosta:
Part One: Mild beginnings; Impudent conduct; The Molly Maguires; The great riots of 1877
Part two: “Dynamite…that’s the stuff!”; Propaganda by the deed; The stage is set; The Haymarket bomb; The movement becomes a racket; Criminals join the class war
Part three: War begins an earnest; The Homestead strike; Coxey’s army; The Debs rebellion; Violence in the west; The reddening dawn of the 20th century, To hell with the constitution; The murder trial in Idaho; The wobblies
Part four: The McNamara affair; Class war 1905-1910; The AF of L dynamiters; The Los Angeles dynamite plot; The explosion – and after; Frame up!; The trial; Confessions; The AF of L loses its militancy
Part five: Massacres, frame ups and judicial murders; Slaughter east and west, The Mooney-Billings case, The great steel strike, The Centralia outrage, Sacco and Vanzetti
Part six: Rackets and sabotage; The beginning of racketeering; Racketeering as a phase of class conflict; Sabotage and striking on the job
  tyrnimehu | Sep 1, 2007 |
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Louis Adamicprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bekken, JonForewordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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This book is an effort to to trace the evolution of violence in the class struggle in the United States from the unorganized, spasmodic riots in the eighteen-thirties on the part of ill-treated laborers to the highly organized, criminal "racketeering," of today. -Author's Note
The author of Dynamite has performed a service for which the English and American reader should alike be grateful, -Foreward, S.K. Ratcliffe, 1931
The struggle of the have-nots against the haves in the United States was first referred to as "class war" in 1826 in New York City by Frances Wight, "that bold blasphemer and voluptuous preacher of licentiousness," as a conservative writer of that day called her; but at the time and for some time afterward, the war was merely verbal. -Chapter One "Impudent Conduct"
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"Dynamite harkens back to an era of American capitalism a little less glossy, a little bloodier, and with striking parallels to today."--Feminist Review Labor disputes have produced more violence over a longer period of time in the United States than in any other industrialized country in the world. From the 1890s to the 1930s, hardly a year passed without a serious--and often deadly--clash between workers and management. Written in the 1930s, and with a new introduction by Mike Davis,Dynamite recounts a fascinating and largely forgotten history of class and labor struggle in America's industrial beginnings. It is the story of brutal exploitation, massacres, and judicial murders of the workers. It is also the story of their response: when peaceful strikes yielded no results, workers fought back by any means necessary. Louis Adamic has written the classic story of labor conflict in America, detailing many episodes of labor violence, including the Molly Maguires, the Homestead Strike, Pullman Strike, Colorado Labor Wars, theLos Angeles Times bombing, as well as the case of Sacco and Vanzetti. Louis Adamic emigrated from Slovenia when he was fifteen years old and quickly joined the American labor force. The author of eleven books, he is now recognized as a great figure in early twentieth-century American literature. He was found shot to death in a burning farmhouse in 1954. Introduction by Jon Bekken, co-author ofThe Industrial Workers of the World: Its First Hundred Years, 1905-2005 and co-editor ofAnarcho-Syndicalist Review.

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