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Lifespan: Why We Age―and Why We Don't Have To

by David A. Sinclair

Other authors: Catherine L. Delphia (Illustrator), Matthew D. LaPlante

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344762,100 (3.82)None
"From an acclaimed Harvard professor and one of Time's most influential people, this paradigm-shifting book shows how almost everything we think we know about aging is wrong, offers a front-row seat to the amazing global effort to slow, stop, and reverse aging, and calls readers to consider a future where aging can be treated. For decades, experts have believed that we are at the mercy of our genes, and that natural damage to our genes--the kind that inevitably happens as we get older--makes us become sick and grow old. But what if everything you think you know about aging is wrong? What if aging is a disease--and that disease is treatable? In Lifespan, one of the world's foremost experts on aging and genetics reveals a groundbreaking new theory that will forever change the way we think about why we age and what we can do about it. Aging isn't immutable; we can have far more control over it than we realize. This eye-opening and provocative work takes us to the frontlines of research that is pushing the boundaries on our perceived scientific limitations, revealing incredible breakthroughs--many from Dr. David Sinclair's own lab--that demonstrate how we can slow down, or even reverse, the genetic clock. The key is activating newly discovered vitality genes--the decedents of an ancient survival circuit that is both the cause of aging and the key to reversing it. Dr. Sinclair shares the emerging technologies and simple lifestyle changes--such as intermittent fasting, cold exposure, and exercising with the right intensity--that have been shown to help lead to longer lives. Lifespan provides a roadmap for taking charge of our own health destiny and a bold new vision for the future when humankind is able to live to be 100 years young"-- "From an acclaimed Harvard professor and one of Time's most influential people, this paradigm-shifting book shows how almost everything we think we know about aging is wrong, offers a front-row seat to the amazing global effort to slow, stop, and reverse aging, and calls readers to consider a future where aging can be treated"--… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
At my age, late 60s, I found sections of this book to be very useful. For example, my general physician had recommended that I take metformin but she did not do a very good job of explaining the benefits of the drug. Sinclair explained the benefits of metformin above and beyond treating diabetes.

I skimmed through much of the book. I sought out sections that I found practical for my situation. I bypassed the more "scientific related" sections that I did not really understand or had little interest in.

This book has or at least will change some habits in my life particularly when it comes to my diet and exercise habits.

Some of my notes (excerpts) from the book:

I believe that aging is a disease. I believe it is treatable. I believe we can treat it within our lifetimes. And in doing so, I believe, everything we know about human health will be fundamentally changed.

There are some simple tests to determine how biologically old you probably are. The number of push-ups you can do is a good indicator. If you are over 45 and can do more than 20, you are doing well. The other test of age is the sitting rising test. Sit on the floor, barefooted, with the legs crossed. Lean forward quickly and see if you can get up in one move. A young person can. A middle-age person typically needs to push off with one of their hands. An elderly person often needs to get onto one knee.

When we stay healthy and vibrant, as long as we feel young physically and mentally, our age doesn't matter. That's true whether you are 32, 52, or 92. Most middle-aged and older adults in the United States report feeling 10 to 20 years younger than their age, because they feel healthy. And feeling younger than your age predicts lower mortality and better cognitive abilities later in life.

After 25 years of researching aging and having read thousands of scientific papers, if there is one piece of advice I can offer, one sure fire way to stay healthy longer, one thing you can do to maximize your lifespan right now, it's this: eat less often.


( )
  writemoves | Oct 26, 2021 |
Provocative theories around aging - it's a preventable disease state ( )
  starkravingmad | Oct 3, 2021 |
Skip to the end and read what the author do. You would save some time... ( )
  manhtai | Oct 3, 2021 |
Definitely worth a read, even if you're worried about the science behind it. ( )
  rozkalns | May 31, 2021 |
Interesting and passionate discourse on a topic that is not commonly discussed - how to prevent aging. Unfortunately, too many acronyms and technical terms littered within the narrative made it difficult to gain an in-depth understanding of and appreciation for the field. Still, it served as a good introduction and made me interested enough to look for more literature and research about aging. ( )
  rri | Feb 14, 2021 |
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» Add other authors (14 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sinclair, David A.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Delphia, Catherine L.Illustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
LaPlante, Matthew D.secondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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In Tierversuchen liegt der Schlüssel zur Aktivierung des Sirtuin-Programms offenbar darin, dass man für einen Tanz auf der Rasierklinge sorgt - die Nahrungsmenge muss gerade so groß sein, dass eine gesunde Körperfunktion sichergestellt ist, größer aber nicht.
Die köstlichsten Erdbeeren wurden durch Phasen mit begrenzter Wasserzufuhr gestresst.
"Ob durch eine Laune der Natur oder von der Hand eines Terroristen: Nach Angaben von Epidemiologen kann ein Krankheitserreger, der sich schnell durch die Luft fortbewegt, in weniger als einem Jahr über 30 Millionen Menschen das Leben kosten", sagte Bill Gates 2017 bei der Münchner Sicherheitskonferenz. "Und sie sagen, es bestehe durchaus die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass die Welt in den nächsten zehn bis fünfzehn Jahren eine solche Epidemie erleben wird."
Damit Menschen eine weitreichende biometrische Überwachung hinnehmen, die uns helfen kann, sich schnell ausbreitenden, tödlichen Viren voraus zu sein, muss man ihnen etwas anbieten, ohne das sie sich das Leben kaum noch vorstellen können.
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"From an acclaimed Harvard professor and one of Time's most influential people, this paradigm-shifting book shows how almost everything we think we know about aging is wrong, offers a front-row seat to the amazing global effort to slow, stop, and reverse aging, and calls readers to consider a future where aging can be treated. For decades, experts have believed that we are at the mercy of our genes, and that natural damage to our genes--the kind that inevitably happens as we get older--makes us become sick and grow old. But what if everything you think you know about aging is wrong? What if aging is a disease--and that disease is treatable? In Lifespan, one of the world's foremost experts on aging and genetics reveals a groundbreaking new theory that will forever change the way we think about why we age and what we can do about it. Aging isn't immutable; we can have far more control over it than we realize. This eye-opening and provocative work takes us to the frontlines of research that is pushing the boundaries on our perceived scientific limitations, revealing incredible breakthroughs--many from Dr. David Sinclair's own lab--that demonstrate how we can slow down, or even reverse, the genetic clock. The key is activating newly discovered vitality genes--the decedents of an ancient survival circuit that is both the cause of aging and the key to reversing it. Dr. Sinclair shares the emerging technologies and simple lifestyle changes--such as intermittent fasting, cold exposure, and exercising with the right intensity--that have been shown to help lead to longer lives. Lifespan provides a roadmap for taking charge of our own health destiny and a bold new vision for the future when humankind is able to live to be 100 years young"-- "From an acclaimed Harvard professor and one of Time's most influential people, this paradigm-shifting book shows how almost everything we think we know about aging is wrong, offers a front-row seat to the amazing global effort to slow, stop, and reverse aging, and calls readers to consider a future where aging can be treated"--

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It's a seemingly undeniable truth that aging is inevitable. But what if everything we've been taught to believe about aging is wrong? What if we could choose our lifespan?



In this groundbreaking book, Dr. David Sinclair, leading world authority on genetics and longevity, reveals a bold new theory for why we age. As he writes: "Aging is a disease, and that disease is treatable."

This eye-opening and provocative work takes us to the frontlines of research that is pushing the boundaries on our perceived scientific limitations, revealing incredible breakthroughs—many from Dr. David Sinclair's own lab at Harvard—that demonstrate how we can slow down, or even reverse, aging. The key is activating newly discovered vitality genes, the descendants of an ancient genetic survival circuit that is both the cause of aging and the key to reversing it. Recent experiments in genetic reprogramming suggest that in the near future we may not just be able to feel younger, but actually become younger.
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