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Indian-ish: Recipes and Antics from a Modern…
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Indian-ish: Recipes and Antics from a Modern American Family (edition 2019)

by Priya Krishna (Author)

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1854124,495 (3.69)2
Named one of the Best Cookbooks of Spring 2019 by the New York Times, Eater, and Bon Appétit "A joy to cook from, and just as much fun to read." --Margaux Laskey, the New York Times A witty and irresistible celebration of one very cool and boundary-breaking mom's "Indian-ish" cooking--with accessible and innovative Indian-American recipes Indian food is everyday food! This colorful, lively book is food writer Priya Krishna's loving tribute to her mom's "Indian-ish" cooking--a trove of one-of-a-kind Indian-American hybrids that are easy to make, clever, practical, and packed with flavor. Think Roti Pizza, Tomato Rice with Crispy Cheddar, Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Green Pea Chutney, and Malaysian Ramen. Priya's mom, Ritu, taught herself to cook after moving to the U.S. while also working as a software programmer--her unique creations merging the Indian flavors of her childhood with her global travels and inspiration from cooking shows as well as her kids' requests for American favorites like spaghetti and PB&Js. The results are approachable and unfailingly delightful, like spiced, yogurt-filled sandwiches crusted with curry leaves, or "Indian Gatorade" (a thirst-quenching salty-sweet limeade)--including plenty of simple dinners you can whip up in minutes at the end of a long work day. Throughout, Priya's funny and relatable stories--punctuated with candid portraits and original illustrations by acclaimed Desi pop artist Maria Qamar (also known as Hatecopy)--will bring you up close and personal with the Krishna family and its many quirks.… (more)
Member:trcroyle
Title:Indian-ish: Recipes and Antics from a Modern American Family
Authors:Priya Krishna (Author)
Info:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2019), Edition: Illustrated, 256 pages
Collections:Your library
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Indian-ish: Recipes and Antics from a Modern American Family by Priya Krishna

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Showing 4 of 4
Recommended by Alicia G.

-Malaysian Ramen ( )
  JennyArch | Apr 9, 2022 |
A fun beginner-to-intermediate cookbook loaded with simple recipes created by a busy American mom with Indian heritage. ( )
  Zoes_Human | Sep 25, 2020 |
Mostly veg and easy to veganize.
  Vantine | Apr 1, 2020 |
Loved the title and thought it would be an interesting read. Not a great cook by measure but I was intrigued by the premise and always love books of this genre: a combo cookbook/food history/memoir was thoroughly enjoyable with some lovely pictures.

I wasn't familiar with Krishna beforehand so I went into this not knowing what to expect. It's not dissimilar to many other books that are like this. There's a lot about Indian food, her family, insights on recipes, explainers on what ingredients are, where you can find them, how they are used, etc.

For me it was a fun read but it's also not something I would keep. I learned a lot but I would probably compliment this with other recipe books, too.

One downer was that despite the emphasis on recipes the book won't open flat (it's nice but it's not that type of book) so you'll have to either photocopy or wear out the binding or some other workaround.

Borrowed from the library and that was best for me. Probably useful to take a look before deciding if you want to have it in your own collection. ( )
  HoldMyBook | Jul 25, 2019 |
Showing 4 of 4
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Named one of the Best Cookbooks of Spring 2019 by the New York Times, Eater, and Bon Appétit "A joy to cook from, and just as much fun to read." --Margaux Laskey, the New York Times A witty and irresistible celebration of one very cool and boundary-breaking mom's "Indian-ish" cooking--with accessible and innovative Indian-American recipes Indian food is everyday food! This colorful, lively book is food writer Priya Krishna's loving tribute to her mom's "Indian-ish" cooking--a trove of one-of-a-kind Indian-American hybrids that are easy to make, clever, practical, and packed with flavor. Think Roti Pizza, Tomato Rice with Crispy Cheddar, Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Green Pea Chutney, and Malaysian Ramen. Priya's mom, Ritu, taught herself to cook after moving to the U.S. while also working as a software programmer--her unique creations merging the Indian flavors of her childhood with her global travels and inspiration from cooking shows as well as her kids' requests for American favorites like spaghetti and PB&Js. The results are approachable and unfailingly delightful, like spiced, yogurt-filled sandwiches crusted with curry leaves, or "Indian Gatorade" (a thirst-quenching salty-sweet limeade)--including plenty of simple dinners you can whip up in minutes at the end of a long work day. Throughout, Priya's funny and relatable stories--punctuated with candid portraits and original illustrations by acclaimed Desi pop artist Maria Qamar (also known as Hatecopy)--will bring you up close and personal with the Krishna family and its many quirks.

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