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Time's Eye (A Time Odyssey) by Arthur C.…
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Time's Eye (A Time Odyssey) (original 2004; edition 2005)

by Arthur C. Clarke

Series: A Time Odyssey (1)

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1,519308,792 (3.42)12
Sir Arthur C. Clarke is a living legend, a writer whose name has been synonymous with science fiction for more than fifty years. An indomitable believer in human and scientific potential, Clarke is a genuine visionary. If Clarke has an heir among today's science fiction writers, it is award-winning author Stephen Baxter. In each of his acclaimed novels, Baxter has demonstrated dazzling gifts of imagination and intellect, along with a rare ability to bring the most cerebral science dramatically to life. Now these two champions of humanism and scientific speculation have combined their talents in a novel sure to be one of the most talked-about of the year, a 2001 for the new millennium. TIME'S EYE For eons, Earth has been under observation by the Firstborn, beings almost as old as the universe itself. The Firstborn are unknown to humankind- until they act. In an instant, Earth is carved up and reassembled like a huge jigsaw puzzle. Suddenly the planet and every living thing on it no longer exist in a single timeline. Instead, the world becomes a patchwork of eras, from prehistory to 2037, each with its own indigenous inhabitants. Scattered across the planet are floating silver orbs impervious to all weapons and impossible to communicate with. Are these technologically advanced devices responsible for creating and sustaining the rifts in time? Are they cameras through which inscrutable alien eyes are watching? Or are they something stranger and more terrifying still? The answer may lie in the ancient city of Babylon, where two groups of refugees from 2037-three cosmonauts returning to Earth from the International Space Station, and three United Nations peacekeepers on a mission in Afghanistan-have detected radio signals: the only such signals on the planet, apart from their own. The peacekeepers find allies in nineteenth-century British troops and in the armies of Alexander the Great. The astronauts, crash-landed in the steppes of Asia, join forces with the Mongol horde led by Genghis Khan. The two sides set out for Babylon, each determined to win the race for knowledge ... and the power that lies within. Yet the real power is beyond human control, perhaps even human understanding. As two great armies face off before the gates of Babylon, it watches, waiting. ...… (more)
Member:ncw
Title:Time's Eye (A Time Odyssey)
Authors:Arthur C. Clarke
Info:Del Rey (2005), Mass Market Paperback, 384 pages
Collections:Your library
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Time's Eye by Arthur C. Clarke (2004)

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» See also 12 mentions

English (28)  Italian (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (30)
Showing 1-5 of 28 (next | show all)
Very average story with way too many questions left open. ( )
  Guide2 | May 27, 2021 |
What can I expect from a title like that with hard-hitting authors like this?

A little bit of the strengths of both and a few of their weaknesses, of course. Most of the characters feel like Clarke's inventions, but some of the odder characters kinda felt like Baxter.

The real strength of this novel is the slicings of time and location, jaunting whole segments of the Earth's populace into mish-mashes quite like Riverworld.

How do the armies of Genghis Kahn and Alexander the Great sound, clashing in an epic end? Good?

WELCOME TO THIS NOVEL. :)

Astronauts, AI phones, ravening hoards, gentlemen Greek explorers (HA), and modern Afganistan warriors and, for good measure, the missing link species for humanity. The mix is quite fun and the promise is there.

Strong start, fun middle... but what happened to the end?

Oh, wait, book one. Let's see where this goes. :) ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
Interesting premise. Well executed. History and science fiction meet. ( )
  evil_cyclist | Mar 16, 2020 |
This is the second book I've read involving Stephen Baxter, and as far as I can tell, he loves working on great ideas, but the rest of the book isn't nearly as great.
The book blows it's load with it's imaginative idea pretty early, then we get some sleep inducing alternative history kinda book for 90 percent of it, followed up by a short section of some scifi stuff happening.
This feels like a short story that got dragged out to a full novel. For the most part there's no suspense, no action, just people travelling.
It's still not the worst I've read, some enjoyable moments, but I still wouldn't recommend this book. ( )
  Madanie | Dec 3, 2019 |
I didn't have very high hopes for this book, however surprisingly it was remarkably gripping with well developed characters and a unexpectedly good story line. ( )
  HenriMoreaux | Mar 29, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 28 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Clarke, Arthur C.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baxter, Stephenmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Schroeder, JulieDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stevenson, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Winter, BiggyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Cities and Thrones and Powers
Stand in Times's eye,
Almost as long as flowers,
Which daily die:
But, as new buds put forth
To glad new men,
Out of the spent and unconsidered Earth
The Cities rise again.
 
     —Rudyard Kipling
Dedication
First words
Dreißig Millionen Jahre lang war der Planet abgekühlt und ausgetrocknet, bis im Norden Eisschollen an die Kontinente zu drängen begannen. [German edition]
For thirty million years the planet had cooled and dried, until, in the north, ice sheets gouged at the continents.
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Sir Arthur C. Clarke is a living legend, a writer whose name has been synonymous with science fiction for more than fifty years. An indomitable believer in human and scientific potential, Clarke is a genuine visionary. If Clarke has an heir among today's science fiction writers, it is award-winning author Stephen Baxter. In each of his acclaimed novels, Baxter has demonstrated dazzling gifts of imagination and intellect, along with a rare ability to bring the most cerebral science dramatically to life. Now these two champions of humanism and scientific speculation have combined their talents in a novel sure to be one of the most talked-about of the year, a 2001 for the new millennium. TIME'S EYE For eons, Earth has been under observation by the Firstborn, beings almost as old as the universe itself. The Firstborn are unknown to humankind- until they act. In an instant, Earth is carved up and reassembled like a huge jigsaw puzzle. Suddenly the planet and every living thing on it no longer exist in a single timeline. Instead, the world becomes a patchwork of eras, from prehistory to 2037, each with its own indigenous inhabitants. Scattered across the planet are floating silver orbs impervious to all weapons and impossible to communicate with. Are these technologically advanced devices responsible for creating and sustaining the rifts in time? Are they cameras through which inscrutable alien eyes are watching? Or are they something stranger and more terrifying still? The answer may lie in the ancient city of Babylon, where two groups of refugees from 2037-three cosmonauts returning to Earth from the International Space Station, and three United Nations peacekeepers on a mission in Afghanistan-have detected radio signals: the only such signals on the planet, apart from their own. The peacekeepers find allies in nineteenth-century British troops and in the armies of Alexander the Great. The astronauts, crash-landed in the steppes of Asia, join forces with the Mongol horde led by Genghis Khan. The two sides set out for Babylon, each determined to win the race for knowledge ... and the power that lies within. Yet the real power is beyond human control, perhaps even human understanding. As two great armies face off before the gates of Babylon, it watches, waiting. ...

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