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Planting the Anthropocene: Rhetorics of…
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Planting the Anthropocene: Rhetorics of Natureculture (edition 2019)

by Jennifer Clary-Lemon (Author)

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Planting the Anthropocene is a rhetorical look into the world of industrial tree planting in Canada that engages the themes of nature, culture, and environmental change. Bringing together the work of material ecocriticism and critical affect studies in service of a new materialist environmental rhetoric, Planting the Anthropocene forwards a frame that can be used to work through complex scenes of anthropogenic labor.   Using the results of interviews with seasonal Canadian tree planters, Jennifer Clary-Lemon interrogates the complex and messy imbrication of nature-culture through the inadequate terminology used to describe the actual circumstances of the planters' work and lives--and offers alternative ways to conceptualize them. Although silvicultural workers do engage with the limiting rhetoric of efficiency and humanism, they also make rhetorical choices that break down the nature-culture divide and orient them on a continuum that blurs the boundaries between the given and the constructed, the human and nonhuman. Tree-planting work is approached as a site of a deep-seated materiality--a continued re-creation of the land's "disturbance"--rather than a simplistic form of doing good that further separates humans from landscapes.   Jennifer Clary-Lemon's view of nature and the Anthropocene through the lens of material rhetorical studies is thoroughly original and will be of great interest to students and scholars of rhetoric and composition, especially those focused on the environment.  … (more)
Member:kbibliophage
Title:Planting the Anthropocene: Rhetorics of Natureculture
Authors:Jennifer Clary-Lemon (Author)
Info:Utah State University Press (2019), Edition: 1, 219 pages
Collections:Your library, Nonfiction, Rhetoric
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Planting the Anthropocene: Rhetorics of Natureculture by Jennifer Clary-Lemon

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Planting the Anthropocene is a rhetorical look into the world of industrial tree planting in Canada that engages the themes of nature, culture, and environmental change. Bringing together the work of material ecocriticism and critical affect studies in service of a new materialist environmental rhetoric, Planting the Anthropocene forwards a frame that can be used to work through complex scenes of anthropogenic labor.   Using the results of interviews with seasonal Canadian tree planters, Jennifer Clary-Lemon interrogates the complex and messy imbrication of nature-culture through the inadequate terminology used to describe the actual circumstances of the planters' work and lives--and offers alternative ways to conceptualize them. Although silvicultural workers do engage with the limiting rhetoric of efficiency and humanism, they also make rhetorical choices that break down the nature-culture divide and orient them on a continuum that blurs the boundaries between the given and the constructed, the human and nonhuman. Tree-planting work is approached as a site of a deep-seated materiality--a continued re-creation of the land's "disturbance"--rather than a simplistic form of doing good that further separates humans from landscapes.   Jennifer Clary-Lemon's view of nature and the Anthropocene through the lens of material rhetorical studies is thoroughly original and will be of great interest to students and scholars of rhetoric and composition, especially those focused on the environment.  

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