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Supreme Conflict: The Inside Story of the Struggle for Control of the…

by Jan Crawford Greenburg

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384851,533 (3.9)8
Drawing on unprecedented access to the Supreme Court justices and their inner circles, acclaimed ABC News legal correspondent Jan Crawford Greenburg offers an explosive, news-breaking account of one of the most momentous political watersheds in recent American history.
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Another interesting, well researched and well documented (lots of case cites for Supreme Court dorks like myself) look at the Supreme Court since Reagan. If you have already read The Nine, it covers familiar territory but a nice behind the scenes look at recent nomination/confirmations and a good discussion of judicial philosophies of the justices. Politics Law Not too technical makes a good book for anyone interested in the personalities in the Supreme Court.
1 vote walterqchocobo | Apr 8, 2013 |
This book held my interest and is generally well written. It gives a behind-the-scenes account of why presidents nominated certain individuals for the Supreme Court and why they did not nominate others that were under consideration. In that vein, it provides insight into how our highest judges are chosen, but it's also clear from the book that each president has his own way of going about the nomination process. One of the more interesting points described how the qualifications for successful Supreme Court nominees has changed. The book points out that neither Sandra Day O'Connor nor Harriet Miers had a deep, working knowledge of constitutional law prior to their nominations. (The book also puts Lewis Powell in this category.) But back during the time of O'Connor's nomination, the Senate Judiciary Committee (and other Senators) did not grill nominees in the same way that they do today. Today, Senators (and others) expect the nominees to have a strong understanding of constitutional law. That wasn't so several decades ago. This may be the one positive aspect of an otherwise counterproductive trend in the changing shape of Senate confirmation hearings. ( )
1 vote Joe24 | Apr 27, 2011 |
I was afraid this book would be stuffy and one sided so I began reading it with a bit of trepidation. I was pleasantly surprised by how well the author was able to tell the inside story of the struggle for control of the Supreme Court without crossing the line between story teller and political mouthpiece. I was surprised by how interested I was and by how much I ended up enjoying the book. ( )
1 vote jclark88 | Apr 2, 2011 |
I thought this book provided a great look into the politics and personalities of the US Supreme Court. Despite my chosen profession, I rarely get into books about the Supreme Court or law, but I found this book to be a truly interesting read. It was almost gossip-y at points(who knew Sandra Day hated Clarence or loved Rehnquist?), but did more to provide a personality for each Justice than anything I had read before. I wish I had read this before law school - it would have provided some real color to all of those awful red casebooks. I definitely recommend it. ( )
1 vote emmylee04 | Sep 10, 2010 |
It was interesting learning about the Supreme Court and how the justices are chosen and a little bit about the history. ( )
1 vote LiteraryLinda | Feb 3, 2010 |
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Drawing on unprecedented access to the Supreme Court justices and their inner circles, acclaimed ABC News legal correspondent Jan Crawford Greenburg offers an explosive, news-breaking account of one of the most momentous political watersheds in recent American history.

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