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Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime (2019)

by Sean Carroll

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378858,581 (4.03)2
INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A Science News favorite science book of 2019 As you read these words, copies of you are being created.   Sean Carroll, theoretical physicist and one of this world's most celebrated writers on science, rewrites the history of 20th century physics. Already hailed as a masterpiece, Something Deeply Hidden shows for the first time that facing up to the essential puzzle of quantum mechanics utterly transforms how we think about space and time.  His reconciling of quantum mechanics with Einstein's theory of relativity changes, well, everything. Most physicists haven't even recognized the uncomfortable truth: physics has been in crisis since 1927. Quantum mechanics  has always had obvious gaps--which have come to be simply ignored. Science popularizers keep telling us how weird it is,  how impossible it is to understand. Academics discourage students from working on the "dead end" of quantum foundations. Putting his professional reputation on the line with this audacious yet entirely reasonable book, Carroll says that the crisis can now come to an end. We just have to accept that there is more than one of us in the universe. There are many, many Sean Carrolls. Many of every one of us.   Copies of you are generated thousands of times per second. The Many Worlds Theory of quantum behavior says that every time there is a quantum event, a world splits off with everything in it the same, except in that other world the quantum event didn't happen. Step-by-step in Carroll's uniquely lucid way, he tackles the major objections to this otherworldly revelation until his case is inescapably established.   Rarely does a book so fully reorganize how we think about our place in the universe. We are on the threshold of a new understanding--of where we are in the cosmos, and what we are made of.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Carroll makes this difficult concept a bit more accessible. Glad to see more advocates of Many Worlds interpretation. :) ( )
  SeekingApatheia | Apr 13, 2021 |
I've read a fair bit about quantum physics but really couldn't follow this very well. He seemed to over-explain some things, then assume the reader already knew about others. Then he went into a 25-page Socratic Dialogue in the middle which just irritated me. I much prefer John Gribben as an explainer of the quantum world. Maybe this book would better suit someone who actually has a physics degree rather than an enthusiastic amateur like me! ( )
  SChant | Aug 12, 2020 |
What a thought provoking book! Typically, I find “popular science” books very bland and shallow, but Carroll spared no detail from the reader, yet explains every concept extremely thoughtfully and likely easier for non-physicists to understand. I appreciate his wholehearted effort to write a book that tells the story of quantum mechanics, even though it is feared by many. Highly recommend this book to anyone interested in science, physics, the universe or human thought. ( )
  mollymcd4 | Jul 31, 2020 |
Sean Caroll tries to accomplish a herculean task in this one. Bridging the gap between quantum-physics scientists/philosophers and laymen, while at the same detailing how the many-worlds interpretation of the quantum world best fits the facts we know.

I must admit I could not follow most of the math and hard science in it, but I insisted on finishing it to at least know what fundamentals I need to brush up on or learn for future readings. It gave me a desire to know more about the fundamentals and I will re-read it after that to see if it clears up some of my current lapses in understanding.

It's a heavy book and I only recommend it to those that have at least college-level grasps of quantum physics and Bayesian mathematics. ( )
  parzivalTheVirtual | Mar 22, 2020 |
Interesting book about the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. Goes a bit off the deep end in the later chapters. I felt fortunate to have an understanding of Fourier analysis and the equivalence of time and frequency domains to help me begin to understand some of it. The first few chapters give one of the best explanations I have seen about the measurement problem. Ie that detecting an electron causes the wave function to ‘collapse’. Good book. But strictly for physicists. ( )
  jvgravy | Oct 16, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
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INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A Science News favorite science book of 2019 As you read these words, copies of you are being created.   Sean Carroll, theoretical physicist and one of this world's most celebrated writers on science, rewrites the history of 20th century physics. Already hailed as a masterpiece, Something Deeply Hidden shows for the first time that facing up to the essential puzzle of quantum mechanics utterly transforms how we think about space and time.  His reconciling of quantum mechanics with Einstein's theory of relativity changes, well, everything. Most physicists haven't even recognized the uncomfortable truth: physics has been in crisis since 1927. Quantum mechanics  has always had obvious gaps--which have come to be simply ignored. Science popularizers keep telling us how weird it is,  how impossible it is to understand. Academics discourage students from working on the "dead end" of quantum foundations. Putting his professional reputation on the line with this audacious yet entirely reasonable book, Carroll says that the crisis can now come to an end. We just have to accept that there is more than one of us in the universe. There are many, many Sean Carrolls. Many of every one of us.   Copies of you are generated thousands of times per second. The Many Worlds Theory of quantum behavior says that every time there is a quantum event, a world splits off with everything in it the same, except in that other world the quantum event didn't happen. Step-by-step in Carroll's uniquely lucid way, he tackles the major objections to this otherworldly revelation until his case is inescapably established.   Rarely does a book so fully reorganize how we think about our place in the universe. We are on the threshold of a new understanding--of where we are in the cosmos, and what we are made of.

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