HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Fever Year: The Killer Flu of 1918 (2019)

by Don Brown

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
453425,882 (3.75)8
"New Year's Day, 1918. America has declared war on Germany and is gathering troops to fight. But there's something coming that is deadlier than any war. When people begin to fall ill, most Americans don't suspect influenza. The flu is known to be dangerous to the very old, young, or frail. But the Spanish flu is exceptionally violent. Soon, thousands of people succumb. Then tens of thousands...hundreds of thousands and more. Graves can't be dug quickly enough. What made the influenza of 1918 so exceptionally deadly--and what can modern science help us understand about this tragic episode in history? With a journalist's discerning eye for facts and an artist's instinct for true emotion, Sibert Honor recipient Don Brown sets out to answer these questions and more in Fever Year"--From the publisher's web site.… (more)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 8 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
It's unfortunate how timely this is with its recounting of a pandemic that included contagion ships, mask controversies, snake oil cures, politicians prematurely declaring an end to the spread, overworked nurses, and rushed vaccines.

Informative if a little flat due to almost all the text being delivered in typeset caption boxes and an (appropriately) subdued color scheme.

Unrelated to my rating, this was not a good Kindle experience with the book presented in two-page spread format so it appears tiny. The panel magnification scroll didn't even double the size of the panels, leaving them small little stamps floating in a big unused screen. I couldn't even zoom in on the page like I usually can in Kindle. ( )
  villemezbrown | Sep 2, 2020 |
A pandemic that spread 'round the world alarmingly fast? Hospitals overwhelmed? Elected officials debating the efficacy of masks?

Reading about the flu pandemic of 1918 was eerie. Don Brown's sepia toned panels underscored the despair of these times. ( )
  kivarson | Aug 23, 2020 |
I never really saw the appeal of graphic novels. I'm primarily a verbal learner, not visually oriented. But I noted a suggestion years ago at a children's literature conference that the graphic format could be very useful to get young people interested in history and other nonfiction topics. So when our Jr. Library Guild order brought us a graphic nonfiction treatment about the 1918 Flu Pandemic, I thought it worth a look.

I was impressed.

There's a lot of information in that slender volume Fever Year by Don Brown. I've read several books and attended a presentation by a history professor on the subject, but I learned some new things from this book. This book takes its history seriously -- it is complete with notes and a bibliography. The illustrations help bring home just how awful the flu pandemic was.

Highly recommended. ( )
  tymfos | Aug 12, 2020 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
Dedicated to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an underappreciated American treasure.
First words
New Year's Day, 1918. America was at war.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"New Year's Day, 1918. America has declared war on Germany and is gathering troops to fight. But there's something coming that is deadlier than any war. When people begin to fall ill, most Americans don't suspect influenza. The flu is known to be dangerous to the very old, young, or frail. But the Spanish flu is exceptionally violent. Soon, thousands of people succumb. Then tens of thousands...hundreds of thousands and more. Graves can't be dug quickly enough. What made the influenza of 1918 so exceptionally deadly--and what can modern science help us understand about this tragic episode in history? With a journalist's discerning eye for facts and an artist's instinct for true emotion, Sibert Honor recipient Don Brown sets out to answer these questions and more in Fever Year"--From the publisher's web site.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.75)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5 1
4 4
4.5 1
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,595,560 books! | Top bar: Always visible