HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Beverly, Right Here

by Kate DiCamillo

Series: Three Rancheros (3)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
19417108,507 (3.91)4
Revisiting once again the world of Raymie Nightingale, two-time Newbery Medalist Kate DiCamillo turns her focus to the tough-talking, inescapably tenderhearted Beverly. Beverly put her foot down on the gas. They went faster still. This was what Beverly wanted -- what she always wanted. To get away. To get away as fast as she could. To stay away. Beverly Tapinski has run away from home plenty of times, but that was when she was just a kid. By now, she figures, it's not running away. It's leaving. Determined to make it on her own, Beverly finds a job and a place to live and tries to forget about her dog, Buddy, now buried underneath the orange trees back home; her friend Raymie, whom she left without a word; and her mom, Rhonda, who has never cared about anyone but herself. Beverly doesn't want to depend on anyone, and she definitely doesn't want anyone to depend on her. But despite her best efforts, she can't help forming connections with the people around her -- and gradually, she learns to see herself through their eyes. In a touching, funny, and fearless conclusion to her sequence of novels about the beloved Three Rancheros, #1 New York Times best-selling author Kate DiCamillo tells the story of a character who will break your heart and put it back together again.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
Following the death of Buddy, her beloved dog, 14-year old Beverly Tapinski loses her anchor and leaves home, arriving in a small Florida town, with no grand plan and little in the way of money or food. Beverly is taken in by an elderly woman, who is starved for companionship. She takes a job in a local seafood restaurant busing tables, and makes a friend with a 16-year old boy working in a convenience store when she sees his kindness to others. What Beverly cannot see is her own kindness, which she discovers over the course of her stay. For example, spending much of her pay to buy enough raffle tickets so the elderly woman can win the world's largest turkey in the Christmas in July celebration. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Middle Grade: The end of the trilogy begun in Raymie Nightingale. A solid Kate DiCamillo story, with a girl lost, who finds home in an unlikely place, with unlikely people. As always, I enjoy the depiction of Florida, and the quirky people DiCamillo writes. Worth reading, although only as the end of the trilogy. ( )
  empress8411 | Jun 13, 2021 |
Middle Reader. This completes the Raymie Nightingale trilogy in a beautiful way. It is 1979, Beverly is 14 and definitively leaves home after many previous attempts to get away from her controlling, drinking mother. Her father has been gone for 7 years, with no contact. She hitches a ride with her cousin to another FL town and makes a fresh start thanks to the kindness and trustworthiness of Iola Jenkins. The two rely upon each other: Beverly needs a place to stay and Iola's mobile home is just big enough. Iola needs a driver to get her to and from the VFW for Bingo and for grocery and errand runs. Beverly also gets a job at Mr. C's fish restaurant busing tables and learns about work equity and personality types. Finally, she meets Elmer, a kind boy with bad acne who has been bullied through high school but has resilience and a plan for his future that transcends the way he has been treated to date. Quirky as usual per DiCamillo's formula for community and caring, the characters support each other in a network of respect and responsibility. These are not the "beautiful people" on the outside, but they are the folks who get things done, who form the backbone and the goodness of society. Beverly is tough, street-wise and jaded, but she learns to be vulnerable and to trust and to show her soft side to those who earn the privilege. Raymie and Louisiana are mentioned, but this is Beverly's story to go alone. This trilogy is the next generation's Judy Blume and Beverly Clearly. ( )
  CarrieWuj | Oct 24, 2020 |
This book has all the classic Kate DiCamillo standbys: an unlikely animal friend, absent parent, poetry, Florida, a male/female friendship that is almost but not quite romantic, a bond between a kid and an old person, a big meal at the end with all the protagonist’s new friends (who are all from different generations). Luckily, I’m a big fan of Kate DiCamillo, so I’m also fond of her standbys. What’s not to like? They’re tried and true.

This is the third in a sort-of series, and overall I think it’s better than Raymie but not as good as Louisiana. There’s a quote from Because of Winn-Dixie, one of my all-time favorite lines, that goes like this: “I believe, sometimes, that the whole world has an aching heart.” This sentiment lies at the center of all DiCamillo’s books. Beverly is not a sad book, per se, but there is an underlining melancholy that never quite goes away. One of its most unlikable characters repeatedly tells Beverly that she needs to have a dream, that she needs to stop living day-to-day and start thinking bigger or she’ll never be happy or worth anything. But the fact is that Beverly, the daughter of a neglectful, alcoholic mother, doesn’t have the luxury of not living day-to-day. Neither do the other workers at the restaurant where she gets a job - that same mean girl character disparages them for going on strike in an effort to get better wages instead of thinking beyond their little town. It is with this latter group that Beverly finds a new, tenuous family. Like them, she does not need grand dreams to be happy; she needs security, and she finds a bit of that by the end, enough to set her at ease, to give you the sense that she can heal as time goes on. There is something admirable in acknowledging that kids don’t have to have dreams to be worthy of love. Learning how to exist in the world, learning how to open up, is courageous, too. The ending reflects this. The sadness doesn’t completely go away; there is no dramatic happy ending. There is simply the sense that Beverly is a little better off than she was before, and that she will be able to find healing in the future.

It’s nice, it’s familiar, it’s very well-done, but it’s not... particularly ambitious. There was a time when Kate DiCamillo was the queen of kid lit. The woman has two Newberys, the first of which she received only three years after receiving an Honor. She’s a two-time National Book Award Finalist, she won the Boston Globe-Horn Book, she was the U.S. National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature from 2014 to 2015. She’s still beloved - the turnout for her children’s keynote speech at the Boston Book Festival last year was terrific - but I think her books aren’t as exciting as they used to be. They just aren’t as fresh, and there are other authors writing more interesting, diverse stories, and those stories are the ones winning the awards now. I mean, Beverly, as much as I liked it, doesn’t do anything new even by DiCamillo terms. That makes me kind of sad, because I absolutely adore her - Winn-Dixie is perhaps my all-time favorite book. But it’s nice, too; it’s nice to know that these new innovative stories are out there, and it’s nice to know that DiCamillo will always be waiting with a story that will, like a Littmus Lozenge, make me sad and happy both. What she does she does masterfully. This book is just short enough to never lose your attention and just long enough to satisfy, so if it sounds at all appealing, you should definitely read it. It won’t be anything especially new, but it won’t disappoint, either. ( )
  livmae | Jul 17, 2020 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
All three of these books have a certain dreamlike quality that keeps me calm as the kids show independence that in a different setting would end up horrific. But in these books, as in my life, most people are decent. Even the bad guys aren't mass murdering psychopaths, but venial people trying to avoid trouble or grab a quick buck. Jerome and his whiffle bat hold-up, Tom (I think that's the son's name) and his distant and unempathetic care for his mom, Mr Delos's haphazard management of the cafe. Beverly gets a hard blow, and her grieving for her dog wounds her, but the unexpected place she finds herself allows her to heal. ( )
  ejmam | Apr 1, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
Beverly has matured some from the 10-year-old she was in the first book, but her disposition is as sharp as ever. Her defenses are up, meaning she’s hard to like. But there’s a responsive, redeemable person under the hard shell.
added by cej1027 | editRedeemed Readiner, Janie ? (Oct 22, 2019)
 

Belongs to Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Revisiting once again the world of Raymie Nightingale, two-time Newbery Medalist Kate DiCamillo turns her focus to the tough-talking, inescapably tenderhearted Beverly. Beverly put her foot down on the gas. They went faster still. This was what Beverly wanted -- what she always wanted. To get away. To get away as fast as she could. To stay away. Beverly Tapinski has run away from home plenty of times, but that was when she was just a kid. By now, she figures, it's not running away. It's leaving. Determined to make it on her own, Beverly finds a job and a place to live and tries to forget about her dog, Buddy, now buried underneath the orange trees back home; her friend Raymie, whom she left without a word; and her mom, Rhonda, who has never cared about anyone but herself. Beverly doesn't want to depend on anyone, and she definitely doesn't want anyone to depend on her. But despite her best efforts, she can't help forming connections with the people around her -- and gradually, she learns to see herself through their eyes. In a touching, funny, and fearless conclusion to her sequence of novels about the beloved Three Rancheros, #1 New York Times best-selling author Kate DiCamillo tells the story of a character who will break your heart and put it back together again.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.91)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 9
3.5 4
4 14
4.5
5 9

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,445,117 books! | Top bar: Always visible