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Loveless by Oseman Alice
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Loveless (edition 2020)

by Oseman Alice (Author)

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1,5124112,291 (4.14)18
Young Adult Fiction. Young Adult Literature. LGBTQIA+ (Fiction.) HTML:

For fans of Love, Simon and I Wish You All the Best, a funny, honest, messy, completely relatable story of a girl who realizes that love can be found in many ways that don't involve sex or romance.

From the marvelous author of Heartstopper comes an exceptional YA novel about discovering that it's okay if you don't have sexual or romantic feelings for anyone . . . since there are plenty of other ways to find love and connection.

This is the funny, honest, messy, completely relatable story of Georgia, who doesn't understand why she can't crush and kiss and make out like her friends do. She's surrounded by the narrative that dating + sex = love. It's not until she gets to college that she discovers the A range of the LGBTQIA+ spectrum coming to understand herself as asexual/aromantic. Disrupting the narrative that she's been told since birth isn't easy there are many mistakes along the way to inviting people into a newly found articulation of an always-known part of your identity. But Georgia's determined to get her life right, with the help of (and despite the major drama of) her friends.

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… (more)
Member:seirrgang
Title:Loveless
Authors:Oseman Alice (Author)
Info:HARPER COLLINS (2020), Edition: International Edition
Collections:Your library
Rating:
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Loveless by Alice Oseman

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» See also 18 mentions

English (39)  Italian (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (41)
Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
Alice Oseman has a real good sense on dialogue. That’s what made this book really enjoyable for me. Each voice has their own sense of personality for all the characters. The themes that were explored on love were clear and digestible. I believe a lot of young people will still enjoy this story for years to come.

The reason why I didn’t rate this higher was I didn’t always have a good sense of the setting and environment that we were in. Again, this book is very dialogue heavy which was strong but there was a sense that I didn’t know always where the characters were in space. There was good examples of this displayed a certain points of the book like when they performed “Your Song” to Pip while on the boat down the river. I could really imagine the scene in mind. I just wished there were more moments like that. Overall, it’s an easy read that folks who are transitioning to college and trying figure themselves out (sexuality, gender, etc.) could very much relate to. Also, the audiobook was really nice to listen to alongside the book. ( )
  TheArtOfPrin | May 27, 2024 |
i love books about college
this was a topic i hadn’t seen explored in books before ( )
  maggiewh | Mar 19, 2024 |
Reading the description of this novel, which won YA (Young Adult) Book Prize in 2021, it seemed a perfect fit for prompts in two (of four) reading challenges I have undertaken this year: a book with a character on the ace spectrum (PopSugar Reading Challenge) and a book that features a loving LGBTQIA relationship (Around the Year in 52 Challenge). It was a perfect fit. And I learned a lot about the many shades of sexuality that a younger generation is free to discuss and learn about that would never have been discussed in the allegedly free-wheeling 70s when I was a young adult at “uni”, like the five friends who form the core group of characters in this novel. Pansexuals, gay asexuals, aromantic-asexuals (aro-ace). How wonderful that people who once felt so marginalized and had to hide are able to find others like themselves and to learn to thrive on other loving relationships that don’t involve sex or even romance. The characters were interesting – and each had his or her own verbal tics and quirks that made them come to life: Pip (Felipa), Georgia, and Jason, who had been friends in Kent before university; Rooney, Georgia’s roommate; and Sunil, Georgia’s college “parent” (mentor) – and the storyline was interesting, a coming-of-age novel that explores once hidden and taboo subjects that marginalized people who did not fit a specific societal expectation likely repressed when I was younger because they had no name for it. The exploration of those many feelings and fears was enlightening and credibly rendered through the characters.

Alice Oseman is a YA author and illustrator, so I get that I was not the intended audience, and the things that may have detracted from the overall quality in my view may just be artifacts of a formal education in a different generation. I found the use of the word “me” as subject in the mouths of these university students somewhat off-putting, and it was used by several of these characters. My initial reaction was that students smart enough to get into a university in the UK (where this novel is set) would have been through the rigors of grammar and needed to be proficient in it. Or maybe that’s the way university students speak to each other these days. I would give it three-plus stars, but not a four, bearing in mind that some of the tempering of the rating is because of that grammar issue that, for me, affected the credibility of the characters. ( )
  bschweiger | Feb 4, 2024 |
YA fans looking for an excellent portrayal of an ace character will find everything they need in Georgia Warr. Readers are along for the ride as Georgia is just beginning to understand her desire for romance and love without sex as she also navigates the end of high school and the start of college. ( )
  Hccpsk | Jan 24, 2024 |
Things I didn't like about this book:

1. It felt didactic at times, like the purpose of the story was to educate readers about being asexual and other queer identities. I understand why Oseman felt she needed to be super clear in the text about certain things (e.g. saying that asexuality is a "big, big spectrum with a whole range of different feelings and experiences") because she didn't want to come across as trying to speak for all asexual people. So it's funny/sad to me that there are negative reviews of this book based on readers feeling that Oseman was trying to say all asexual people are like her. To quote one review, "...this book very much makes the reader feel like this is THE ONLY aroace experience." Oseman inserted didactic dialogue to clearly point out that hers is *not* the only ace experience. And yet this negative review has 400 likes. I think the takeaway here is that there will always be this kind of criticism when you're writing a book about an underrepresented identity. The "danger of the single story" will always haunt your reviews, even when you insert disclaimers.

2. There wasn't much of a plot beyond typical friendship/romance drama.

Things I did like about this book:

1. The characters were for the most part very lovable and fun to spend time with.

2. I enjoy a college setting and learning new things about how the first year at university in the UK is different from the US. Is "fresher" a new term to replace "freshman" bc it's genderless? Is getting "college married" a thing at most UK universities? How do you pronounce soc? I know it's short for society, but I still want to say it like the beginning of the word social.

3. There was some really lovely exploration of friendship being just as important as romantic relationships. In other media (e.g. Sex and the City) you sometimes see characters claiming that friendships are equal to or greater than romantic partnerships, but it felt more poignant in Loveless because Georgia is so certain she will never be in a romantic partnership. And I loved when she went all in on a romcom grand gesture for her friend.
( )
  LibrarianDest | Jan 3, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Alice Osemanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Church, ImogenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fulford-Brown, BillieNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schenk, ElizabethNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
If it proves so, then loving goes by haps:
Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.

Much Ado About Nothing, William Shakespeare
Dedication
First words
There were literally three separate couples sitting around the fire making out, like some sort of organised kissing orgy, and half of me was like, ew, and the other half was like, Wow, I sure do wish that was me.
Quotations
It was all sinking in. I'd never had a crush on anyone. No boys, no girls, not a single person I'd ever met. What did that mean?
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Young Adult Fiction. Young Adult Literature. LGBTQIA+ (Fiction.) HTML:

For fans of Love, Simon and I Wish You All the Best, a funny, honest, messy, completely relatable story of a girl who realizes that love can be found in many ways that don't involve sex or romance.

From the marvelous author of Heartstopper comes an exceptional YA novel about discovering that it's okay if you don't have sexual or romantic feelings for anyone . . . since there are plenty of other ways to find love and connection.

This is the funny, honest, messy, completely relatable story of Georgia, who doesn't understand why she can't crush and kiss and make out like her friends do. She's surrounded by the narrative that dating + sex = love. It's not until she gets to college that she discovers the A range of the LGBTQIA+ spectrum coming to understand herself as asexual/aromantic. Disrupting the narrative that she's been told since birth isn't easy there are many mistakes along the way to inviting people into a newly found articulation of an always-known part of your identity. But Georgia's determined to get her life right, with the help of (and despite the major drama of) her friends.

.

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