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Scot Under the Covers

by Suzanne Enoch

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5717371,695 (4.34)None
"Miranda Harris is known for her charm, wit, and ability to solve any problem she encounters. But when her brother lands neck-deep in gambling debt to a crafty villain and Miranda is subsequently blackmailed into marrying him, she must enlist the help of the devil himself to save the family honor--and herself. Devilishly handsome Highlander Aden MacTaggert knows next to nothing about the ways of the ton, but he most certainly knows his way around gaming halls and womens' hearts. Still, Aden is not sure how he'll manage to find a Sassenach bride in time to save his family's inheritance. When his almost sister-in-law Miranda comes to him for assistance, he proposes a partnership: She will help him navigate London society and he'll teach her everything about wagering...and winning back her freedom. The beautiful, clever lass intrigues Aden--but is she playing her own game, or are the sparks between them real? He is accustomed to risking his pocket. But betting on Miranda's love is a game he can't afford to lose. . ." --… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
I did not like the heroine for maybe the first half or so of the book. She felt judgemental and shrewish to me. She never did impress me, but I liked her more when she had thawed a bit. The plot on the other hand, got a little convoluted in the second half, with lots of scheming, and trying to keep our interest by not revealing the plan to the reader, but even then the plan wasn't all that impressive... and it just didn't hold my interest as well as the first half. But, overall I was still entertained, and I don't regret reading it. ( )
  JorgeousJotts | Dec 3, 2021 |
Scot Under the Covers has an excellent cover. And there is, indeed, a Scot within the pages.
However, the plot covers some very familiar territory. Gambling and saving the family's fortunes by allying with a scoundrel, etc.
Souring my enjoyment of this book was the dirty dishtowel brother who caused all this mess. Why are women always cleaning up after the useless men in their lives? Yes, this is reality and Enoch set things up so it was clear the heroine needed to fix things to save herself as well as her brother (an evil blackmailing jerk forcing her into marriage), but I found that I was annoyed at the brother and bored by another iteration of a similar plot.
However, it's likely that I'm simply burned out on historical romance and that readers who haven't read this plot 15 times will love it.
  Cerestheories | Nov 8, 2021 |
Miranda Harris has a problem. In order to repay a gambling debt her brother she has to marry a man who disgusts her. The only person she can think to ask to help is Aden MacTaggert who is going to be her brother-in-law. She doesn't trust gamblers and Aden is one but she needs his help to deal with her problems and perhaps to find a path away from disaster.

It was a fun read, humourous and fun with two characters who sparked off each other well. ( )
  wyvernfriend | May 21, 2021 |

“Scot Under the Covers” beginning was definitely touch and go and I was damned near tempted to drop this but the Book Gods above decided to answer my prayers by gracing me the perseverance to claim a few more pages then wa-lah! Matthew true intentions and dealings came to light which help lead and created the phenomenal partnership between Aden and Miranda. I immediately fell in love with their banterful relationship filled with stolen kisses, steamy moments, and badassery of our fine ass highlander. This was perfect swoon worthy historical romance I’ve been looking for a while.

( )
  ayoshina | Oct 2, 2020 |
Fantastic book. The three MacTaggert men were summoned to London after their younger sister became engaged. Seventeen years earlier, their mother left Scotland to return to "civilized" London, taking Eloise with her. They heard nothing from their mother, Francesca, until being told of the agreement between her and their father. Each of them was to marry an English woman before Eloise marries, or lose the money Francesca provides to keep the Scottish lands afloat. They weren't happy about it and made no secret of the fact. The first book, It's Getting Scot in Here, told the story of the youngest brother, Niall, and how he fell for the woman his mother picked for his oldest brother.

I loved the opening chapter of this book. A wager between middle brother, Aden, and oldest brother, Coll, gives a quick peek at who Aden is. He is known as the charming one, with a penchant for gambling. The boot toss bet was an amusing one, as was the bantering between the two brothers. There was also a glimpse of another side of Aden when a grimy dog stole one of his boots. It gets even better when the dog follows Aden home.

Then comes the introduction of Miranda and Aden. Miranda's brother, Matthew, is engaged to Eloise. She is charming, intelligent, well-liked - and outspoken. She is aware of Eloise's desire to make a match between Miranda and Aden and has listened attentively to Eloise's stories about her brothers. While noticing his good looks and charm, she is also aware of his reputation. Aden also notices her, especially that she is not empty-headed, and considers getting to know her better. That is, until she bluntly states, "I detest gambling. And gamblers." Aden is highly intelligent and also very private. Even within his family, he is known as the elusive one, who doesn't share his thoughts, feelings, or plans with anyone. Gambling is a form of entertainment for him, a chance to exercise his brain. While intrigued by the only woman who has spoken back to him, he's not interested in making an effort to overcome her objections. However, fate isn't done with them.

Miranda's brother Matthew is a friendly but somewhat naïve young man. He became the target of an unscrupulous man who lured him into wagering far more than he can afford. Now Matthew is in debt to Captain Vale for fifty thousand pounds, which is far more than even his family can pay. Unfortunately, Vale has a different plan for repayment. He wants Miranda's hand in marriage and will accept nothing less. Miranda is horrified when she finds out what Matthew did, and furious at what he expects her to do. She is not ready to hand herself over to Vale and seeks help from the only person she can think of - Aden.

I loved the conversation between Miranda and Aden. She is desperate for help but reluctant to show it. Aden is still a little peeved at her dislike of him, especially considering his reaction to her. I loved how they settled whether or not he would help her. I was happy to see Miranda trust him enough to tell him the whole story. Aden's reaction was what I expected. Regardless of his feelings for her, he is incensed at the idea of her being forced to marry someone.

I loved the teamwork between Aden and Miranda as they worked to thwart Vale's plans. Aden isn't accustomed to sharing his plans with anyone, but Miranda refuses to sit back and let him handle everything. I loved watching them find ways to spend time together to further their attempts. The time that they spend together gives them a chance to get to know each other. I loved Miranda's slow realization that Aden is much different than the reckless gambler she first thought he was. Miranda surprised herself when she discovered that she liked him and that she trusted him. Aden was all-in from the moment he agreed to help Miranda. It didn't take him long at all to admit to himself that he had found the lass he wanted. There was no way he was going to let Vale win. One of my favorite scenes was at the ball, where Aden made his pursuit of Miranda public. Her reaction: "The captain had set up a very complicated game of chess and had moved all the pieces precisely where he wanted them, and Aden had just sat down opposite Vale and dumped over the table."

I enjoyed seeing the admiration and trust between Aden and Miranda turn to love. It wasn't easy for either of them to admit. Aden's past made it difficult for him to rely on a woman. Miranda's mistrust of gamblers was hard to overcome. Both knew that there was no chance for them if they didn't stop Vale. As Vale's demands intensified, so did their determination. I loved seeing the changes in Aden as he broke with his usual solitary methods and asked for help from his brothers. I was glued to the pages as the showdown between Aden and Vale grew closer. The scene at the card game was fantastic, and I enjoyed the way that Aden poked at Vale. I loved Aden's deviation from his original plan, not just the reason but the advice that made it happen. That was just the beginning, and I was on the edge of my seat as the rest of the plan went through. The confrontation between Aden and Vale was great, though I thought Vale got off easier than he should have. I especially liked Miranda's idea of what to do with the other information they acquired.

I loved how Aden and Miranda came together at the end. Aden's honorable nature has held him back from a full declaration of his intentions. He doesn't want Miranda to feel obligated by gratitude. Miranda is frustrated by his reticence, but also slightly afraid that he will walk away. I laughed out loud at how she turned the tables on him.

Secondary characters: Vale was a villain who was easy to hate. It was bad enough to see the way he targeted and used Matthew. Vale's arrogance and confidence in the way he spoke to Miranda were chilling. The more that Aden uncovered about Vale, the more horrifying he was. Aden's mother, Francesca, has continued to grow on me since the beginning of the first book. Her love for her sons is evident, but her manipulations to get them to London come between them. Her interactions with Aden show that there is still a long way to go, but that there is hope. I also get the feeling that there may be more to the story behind her split with her husband. I love the relationship between the brothers, Coll, Aden, and Niall. They may tease and argue, but they are there for each other when needed. By the end of the book, Coll is the only one unattached. Thanks to his early interactions with Society, he is at a disadvantage in his bride search. I enjoyed Aden's advice to him and look forward to reading his story. Then there is Matthew. In the first book, he is seen mostly as the pleasant young man who is engaged to Eloise. He handles his meeting with her brothers well. He doesn't show as well in this book. To have gambled that recklessly is terrible enough, but to sell his sister to settle his debt is deplorable. I was honestly surprised that he was undamaged by the end of the book, especially after the MacTaggert brothers learned about what he did. ( )
  scoutmomskf | Apr 30, 2020 |
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"Miranda Harris is known for her charm, wit, and ability to solve any problem she encounters. But when her brother lands neck-deep in gambling debt to a crafty villain and Miranda is subsequently blackmailed into marrying him, she must enlist the help of the devil himself to save the family honor--and herself. Devilishly handsome Highlander Aden MacTaggert knows next to nothing about the ways of the ton, but he most certainly knows his way around gaming halls and womens' hearts. Still, Aden is not sure how he'll manage to find a Sassenach bride in time to save his family's inheritance. When his almost sister-in-law Miranda comes to him for assistance, he proposes a partnership: She will help him navigate London society and he'll teach her everything about wagering...and winning back her freedom. The beautiful, clever lass intrigues Aden--but is she playing her own game, or are the sparks between them real? He is accustomed to risking his pocket. But betting on Miranda's love is a game he can't afford to lose. . ." --

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