HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

POW: Allied Prisoners in Europe, 1939-45

by Adrian Gilbert

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
272693,868 (3.8)None
Just under 300,000 Allied servicemen from Britain, the Commonwealth and the United States were captured in Europe and North Africa between 1939 and 1945. Using a wealth of new sources, POW describes their experiences. Prisoners' day-to-day lives are vividly rendered: the workings of the prison-camp system; the ways in which prisoners maintained contact with the outside world through letters, parcels and the benign agency of the Red Cross; artistic and intellectual endeavours; as well as unacknowledged aspects of camp life such as the development of sexual relations - both heterosexual and homosexual. Everyday life is offset by high drama, as POW tells of the secret organisations who smuggled escape aids to the prisoners. In return they furnished their home nations with intelligence from occupied Europe. Although few men were actively engaged in escape attempts, many provided tacit support or were engaged in sabotage and other resistance activities. Adrian Gilbert foregrounds the forgotten voices of the prisoners themselves by threading eleven individual stories through the narrative. POW is a compelling window onto a crucial aspect of the Second World War.… (more)
20th century (2) academic (2) C3 (1) eb (1) Europe (1) Graham (1) history (5) military (1) modern (1) non-fiction (2) novel-refs (2) oflags (1) POW (1) POW's (2) prisoners of war (2) read (1) stalags (1) to-read (2) WWII (9)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 2 of 2
Great book. There's been a lot of books about individual camps, but this is the first I've read that covers the whole POW experience in Germany and Italy. Gilbert weaves his book around the individual stories of 11 individuals from Britain, the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, representing all the armed services and all ranks, and covers all the main camps in both Axis countries. Some surprises, the Italians were much stricter in some ways than the Germans, prisoners were able to undertake exams from British universities with unbelievable co-operation between Britain and Germany meaning exam papers could be sent to the camps and returned to Britain for marking, and that some prisoners on work details even managed to have romances with German women. The way the prisoners rose above their miserable situation to make the best of things is quite inspiring, although there are some dark tales of crime and violence. Terriffic read for anyone interested in WWII or war history in general. ( )
  drmaf | May 1, 2017 |
Fine book about life for Allied prisoners of war in German and Italian prison camps. Covers daily life, occupations, boredom, Red Cross packages, interaction between prisoners and captors. General because it does not focus on one specific P.O.W. camp, though it refers a lot to both Colditz and to Oflag Luft III (American and British compounds) of Great Escape fame. ( )
  marylinusca | Feb 22, 2008 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Just under 300,000 Allied servicemen from Britain, the Commonwealth and the United States were captured in Europe and North Africa between 1939 and 1945. Using a wealth of new sources, POW describes their experiences. Prisoners' day-to-day lives are vividly rendered: the workings of the prison-camp system; the ways in which prisoners maintained contact with the outside world through letters, parcels and the benign agency of the Red Cross; artistic and intellectual endeavours; as well as unacknowledged aspects of camp life such as the development of sexual relations - both heterosexual and homosexual. Everyday life is offset by high drama, as POW tells of the secret organisations who smuggled escape aids to the prisoners. In return they furnished their home nations with intelligence from occupied Europe. Although few men were actively engaged in escape attempts, many provided tacit support or were engaged in sabotage and other resistance activities. Adrian Gilbert foregrounds the forgotten voices of the prisoners themselves by threading eleven individual stories through the narrative. POW is a compelling window onto a crucial aspect of the Second World War.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.8)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 1
3.5
4
4.5 2
5 1

GenreThing

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,237,138 books! | Top bar: Always visible