HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Sand Talk: How Indigenous Thinking Can Save the World

by Tyson Yunkaporta

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
613334,443 (3.91)1
This remarkable book is about everything from echidnas to evolution, cosmology to cooking, sex and science and spirits to Schr dinger's cat. Tyson Yunkaporta looks at global systems from an Indigenous perspective. He asks how contemporary life diverges from the pattern of creation. How does this affect us? How can we do things differently? Sand Talk provides a template for living. It's about how lines and symbols and shapes can help us make sense of the world. It's about how we learn and how we remember. It's about talking to everybody and listening carefully. It's about finding different ways to look at things. Most of all it's about Indigenous thinking, and how it can save the world.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 2 of 2
Tyson Yunkaporta is an aboriginal Australian. There are a lot of books getting attention these days focused on "indigenous wisdom," and this is a standout.

The first thing that stands out to me about the book is its structure; to write each chapter, Yunkaporta crafted an object to serve as a "mnemonic." I've experimented some over the years with using different methods of structuring writing, and I've heard many stories about aboriginal song lines, but I haven't seen anything like this before! It is a practice I'd like to reflect more on.

Yunkaporta begins by speaking about narcissists. He establishes that the difference between colonizing cultures and indigenous cultures is that the former have a mindset of "better-than." This is a very simple idea that also is very true.

Like a lot of books these days, "Sand Talk" gets pretty deep into ontology and epistemology. At the last chapter, he recaps the book through looking at five windows of knowing: 1) learning through close observation and demonstration, 2) passing on knowledge with a helping hand then gradually stepping back, 3) verbally, 4) memorization through deep listening, and 5) thinking, reflecting, and understanding. Like many themes in the book, this is a meta-framework that can be used to reinterpret the book itself.

In this way, it is a book that can be read many times, and new depths will be found with subsequent readings. ( )
  willszal | Mar 5, 2021 |
This book blew my mind so many times, I came out at the other end with a profoundly changed world view. Seeing the system I grew up in challenged in so many and justified ways left me deeply confused, but in a good way. Sand Talk also tied up some loose ends of several ideas I started to ponder when reading books written by other Indigeneous authors. I finished the book, but I am still digesting it's contents and still have more questions than answers, but those questions feel better framed now.

I adore the way Yunkaporta intertwines storystelling with facts; the personal anecdotes make the content very accessible for me. He writes vividly and passionately, and bends English language so it gets the message across more clearly, which I consider an art in itself.

I only missed a bibliography or footnotes that would direct me to resources to learn more about the facts provided in the text. ( )
  readalicious | Jan 7, 2021 |
Showing 2 of 2
Perhaps the most unusual science book of the year is Sand Talk. by Tyson Yunkaporta (Text), which he describes as "a series of yarns with diverse people who all make me feel uncomfortable". Yunkaporta examines subjects such as food, medicine, gender relations and financial and environmental systems by using visual symbols to represent his thinking – he carves objects, and draws pictures in sand. "I'm not reporting on Indigenous Knowledge systems for a global audience’s perspective," he says. "I'm examining global systems from an Indigenous Knowledge perspective." It's a dramatically new (to some) and absorbing way of engaging with the world, and stops just short of exasperation with self-important "western science". "Silly thinking is something everybody is guilty of from time to time," Yunkaporta writes. "It is forgivable as long as you're still listening." It illustrates perfectly that there is no such thing as "the science", that we should question anyone who tries to claim scientific thought as their own, and that intellectual curiosity is everything.
added by Cynfelyn | editThe Guardian, Katy Guest (Nov 28, 2020)
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

This remarkable book is about everything from echidnas to evolution, cosmology to cooking, sex and science and spirits to Schr dinger's cat. Tyson Yunkaporta looks at global systems from an Indigenous perspective. He asks how contemporary life diverges from the pattern of creation. How does this affect us? How can we do things differently? Sand Talk provides a template for living. It's about how lines and symbols and shapes can help us make sense of the world. It's about how we learn and how we remember. It's about talking to everybody and listening carefully. It's about finding different ways to look at things. Most of all it's about Indigenous thinking, and how it can save the world.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.91)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3
3.5 1
4 3
4.5 2
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 157,304,381 books! | Top bar: Always visible