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Begin Again: James Baldwin's America…
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Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our… (edition 2020)

by Eddie S. Glaude Jr. (Author)

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333962,191 (4.11)24
"James Baldwin grew disillusioned by the failure of the Civil Rights movement to force America to confront its lies about race. In the era of Trump, what can we learn from his struggle? "Not everything is lost. Responsibility cannot be lost, it can only be abdicated. If one refuses abdication, one begins again." --James Baldwin We live, according to Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., in the after times, when the promise of Black Lives Matter and the attempt to achieve a new America were challenged by the election of Donald Trump, a racist president whose victory represents yet another failure of America to face the lies it tells itself about race. We have been here before: For James Baldwin, the after times came in the wake of the Civil Rights movement, when a similar attempt to compel a national confrontation with the truth was answered with the murders of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr. In these years, spanning from the publication of The Fire Next Time in 1963 to that of No Name in the Street in 1972, Baldwin was transformed into a more overtly political writer, a change that came at great professional and personal cost. But from that journey, Baldwin emerged with a sense of renewed purpose about the necessity of pushing forward in the face of disillusionment and despair. In the story of Baldwin's crucible, Glaude suggests, we can find hope and guidance through our own after times, this Trumpian era of shattered promises and white retrenchment. Mixing biography--drawn partially from newly uncovered interviews--with history, memoir, and trenchant analysis of our current moment, Begin Again is Glaude's attempt, following Baldwin, to bear witness to the difficult truth of race in America today. It is at once a searing exploration that lays bare the tangled web of race, trauma, and memory, and a powerful interrogation of what we all must ask of ourselves in order to call forth a new America"--… (more)
Member:guelphblackheritage
Title:Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own
Authors:Eddie S. Glaude Jr. (Author)
Info:Crown (2020), Edition: 1st, 272 pages
Collections:Your library
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Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own by Jr. Eddie S. Glaude

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» See also 24 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Author Eddie S Glaude Jr eloquently describes his respect for James Baldwin throughout the pages of this book. In it, he reminds readers that Baldwin "always believed we could be better than what we are." He also reminds us that Baldwin had to fight for that insight. Baldwin was not a man who was afraid. He was someone who ran toward the trouble because he knew that facing our fears was the only possible path to salvation. "If you're scared to death, you walk toward it." Author Glaude does well to remind us readers that Badlwin's words still ring true today. ( )
  kmarson | Nov 16, 2021 |
One of the hardest books I have ever read. I lived through the times but as a white person was thoughtlessly ignorant -- even when I worked for 40 years in an integrated school system.
  Elizabeth80 | Sep 1, 2021 |
Outstanding book about the life of writer James Baldwin and the history of racial predjudice in this country. ( )
  MrDickie | Aug 21, 2021 |
Walter Isaacson, author of Steve Jobs, said, "In this powerful and elegant book on James Baldwin, Eddie Glaude weaves together a biography, a meditation, a literary analysis and a moral essay on America. Like Baldwin's own essays and books, it is at times both loving and angry, challenging and uplifting, and always beautiful. Both Baldwin and this book speak directly to today."
  Doranms | Aug 8, 2021 |
28. Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own by Eddie S. Glaude jr.
reader: Eddie S. Glaude jr.
published: 2020
format: 7:44 audible audiobook, 272 pages in hardcover
acquired: June 11
listened: Jun 14-28
rating: 4
about the author: born in 1968 in Moss Point, Mississippi. Currently Department Chair of the Department of African American Studies at Princeton.

While in the midst of really nice reading streak, this was my commute audio and it fit right in. Glaude reads it himself. He's measured and passionate and reads it perfectly and he creates a nice space to think about James Baldwin.

For all his anger, Baldwin‘s [The Fire Next Time] has an optimism his later, more realistic works, don‘t…especially after he saw Reagan elected in 1979 and understood what it meant. And that‘s covered here. Gaude applies Baldwin to our times and it works both as an ode to one of my favorite humans ever and a passionate pointed analysis of where we are and what Trump meant and our role within (even us horrified by trump and his white-privilege base). This, altogether, is kinda wonderful.

On a personal side note, I read through James Baldwin's works in 2019, but I stopped at the end of that year and never read his later essays and novels from the late 1970's and 1980's. Glaude focuses mainly the works I hadn't read, going into a little detail in them - the novel [Just Above My Head] (1979) and the essay collection [The Price of the Ticket] which covers everything through 1985. (I might have all the essays, not sure). So...I have new motivation to get back to Baldwin and read these later works.

2021
https://www.librarything.com/topic/330945#7547106 ( )
1 vote dchaikin | Jul 4, 2021 |
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James Baldwin and Stokely Carmichael first met during the heady days of the movement to desegregate the South,.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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"James Baldwin grew disillusioned by the failure of the Civil Rights movement to force America to confront its lies about race. In the era of Trump, what can we learn from his struggle? "Not everything is lost. Responsibility cannot be lost, it can only be abdicated. If one refuses abdication, one begins again." --James Baldwin We live, according to Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., in the after times, when the promise of Black Lives Matter and the attempt to achieve a new America were challenged by the election of Donald Trump, a racist president whose victory represents yet another failure of America to face the lies it tells itself about race. We have been here before: For James Baldwin, the after times came in the wake of the Civil Rights movement, when a similar attempt to compel a national confrontation with the truth was answered with the murders of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr. In these years, spanning from the publication of The Fire Next Time in 1963 to that of No Name in the Street in 1972, Baldwin was transformed into a more overtly political writer, a change that came at great professional and personal cost. But from that journey, Baldwin emerged with a sense of renewed purpose about the necessity of pushing forward in the face of disillusionment and despair. In the story of Baldwin's crucible, Glaude suggests, we can find hope and guidance through our own after times, this Trumpian era of shattered promises and white retrenchment. Mixing biography--drawn partially from newly uncovered interviews--with history, memoir, and trenchant analysis of our current moment, Begin Again is Glaude's attempt, following Baldwin, to bear witness to the difficult truth of race in America today. It is at once a searing exploration that lays bare the tangled web of race, trauma, and memory, and a powerful interrogation of what we all must ask of ourselves in order to call forth a new America"--

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