HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

A children's bible : a novel by Lydia Millet
Loading...

A children's bible : a novel (original 2020; edition 2020)

by Lydia Millet

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1279159,726 (4.1)21
"An indelible and haunting new novel that explores the loss of childhood, intergenerational conflict, and humanity's complacency in the face of its own demise. Lydia Millet's multilayered new novel - her first since the National Book Award Longlist Sweet Lamb of Heaven -- follows a group of children and their families on summer vacation at a lakeside mansion. The teenage narrator Eve and the other children are contemptuous of their parents, who spend the days and nights in drunken stupor. This tension heightens when a great storm arrives and throws the house and its residents into chaos. Named for a picture Bible given to Eve's little brother Jack, A Children's Bible is loosely structured around events and characters that often appear in collections of Bible stories intended for young readers. These narrative touchstones are imbedded in a backdrop of environmental and psychological distress as the children reject the parents for their emotional and moral failures-in part as normal teenagers must, and in part for their generation's passivity and denial in the face of cataclysmic change. In A Children's Bible, Millet offers brilliant commentary on the environment and human weakness and a vision of what awaits us on the other side of Revelations"--… (more)
Member:mdexter
Title:A children's bible : a novel
Authors:Lydia Millet
Info:New York, NY : W. W. Norton & Company, [2020]
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

Work details

A Children's Bible by Lydia Millet (2020)

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 21 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
I can't think of how a book could be more 2020 than this. Just finished last night and I am absolutely gutted by this book.

I got it from the library because I've enjoyed two of her other books but didn't know anything about it going in. That might have been a good thing, but it was also a little disorienting because the book involves climate change disaster, a mini-pandemic, and armed militia groups...like Millet was tapped into many people's exact fears at this exact moment.

I can't really explain why this affected me so much. The writing is simple and almost dreamlike, and the whole story has the quality of a fable, with many layers of allusion. It is a perfectly crafted horror story for our time. ( )
  sansmerci | Oct 15, 2020 |
I almost gave up on this book around the halfway point, but then my opinion momentarily improved and I pressed on. Unfortunately, it didn't last. This novel starts with a group of overprivileged teens whining about everything. It ends with them complaining about their terrible parents. Meanwhile, the world goes to shit.

Perhaps there's an allegory here for parenting, privilege, religion, or something--I just didn't have enough interest in the story to truly pay attention. ( )
  chrisblocker | Oct 4, 2020 |
In the past few months I have often half-kidded about the glut of signs of the biblical apocalypse (we laugh so we do not cry.) Lydia Millet has stopped kidding and has created a proper narrative around this. There is likely no better person to do this than the brilliant Millet who is a gifted writer, a working climate scientist, and a woman with a knowledge of scripture, a sense of humor, and a core of decency.

This is a short book that took me longer to read than most twice its length. It is a hard read - most of the time when I say that I am referring to emotional toll, but in this case I am using it in the intellectual sense (though I suppose it could be read as just a cool story and someone could ignore that it - like all bible stories - is a parable.) This is a book that sent me skittering back to check biblical passages and to read swaths of Plato's The Last Days of Socrates (mostly the Crito) and a bit of Arne Naess.

I have been reeling lately what with the world in tatters and our country being run by the Monkey King. Add to that the fact that for the first time in my life I have what appears to be a serious back issue so I have been in really serious though lessening pain and you come up with a me doing a lot of feather-light reading. It was great, and it was fun, but I was really ready for something more meaty but not dry and textbook-like, something challenging because it takes brain-power and not just because it obscure and needlessly complicated, and this was perfect. Smart, accessible and important. Seriously people, we are headed for the iceberg - its unavoidable but maybe if we get it together and start behaving like we are not waiting for the rapture it won't take us all down. ( )
  Narshkite | Jul 24, 2020 |
This was a strange novel that I think I really liked. It starts out with a group of families that do a reunion vacation together in a large beach house. The parents are all wealthy and detached from their kids. They mainly drink. The story is told from the children's point of view, who range in age from about 9-18. The children are left on their own, to the extent that they begin a contest to see which kid can last the longest with out the others identifying which parents belong to him/her.

I loved the first half of the book. Then a massive storm/hurricane occurs and things get weird. The power is off and there is a lot of damage. That's not so strange. But it begins to appear that nothing will be going back to normal. Apparently this wasn't just a local storm, but climate change has hit in full force and the globe is suddenly devastated. How these wealthy people with no "street smarts" will survive forms the second half of the novel.

Overall I have mixed feelings about this book. It was a little too strange for me to give a blanket recommendation to read it. However, it was good enough that I want to read more by this author - it was an intriguing book. ( )
  japaul22 | Jul 18, 2020 |
An unusual and imaginative story about the generational divide, parental irresponsibility, the breaking down of communication, climate change and the devastation it all causes. It’s a tale of of survival and self discovery.

I would describe this book as a type of fable or parable. It mirrors certain bible stories and there’s a hint of other worldliness about it. It also almost reminds me of a computer game in some ways! The writing style is in keeping with the storyline. It’s succinct and portrays very well the horror of what is happening with some great imagery. There are a host of interesting characters, the parents being horrifying and the children scarily self sufficient. I wasn’t at all surprised by the turn of events.

A dark and thought provoking apocalyptical read which, although I thought it a little weird, I enjoyed. It’s a story with a warning for our times but it is left on a ray of hope, thankfully. ( )
  VanessaCW | Jun 18, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"An indelible and haunting new novel that explores the loss of childhood, intergenerational conflict, and humanity's complacency in the face of its own demise. Lydia Millet's multilayered new novel - her first since the National Book Award Longlist Sweet Lamb of Heaven -- follows a group of children and their families on summer vacation at a lakeside mansion. The teenage narrator Eve and the other children are contemptuous of their parents, who spend the days and nights in drunken stupor. This tension heightens when a great storm arrives and throws the house and its residents into chaos. Named for a picture Bible given to Eve's little brother Jack, A Children's Bible is loosely structured around events and characters that often appear in collections of Bible stories intended for young readers. These narrative touchstones are imbedded in a backdrop of environmental and psychological distress as the children reject the parents for their emotional and moral failures-in part as normal teenagers must, and in part for their generation's passivity and denial in the face of cataclysmic change. In A Children's Bible, Millet offers brilliant commentary on the environment and human weakness and a vision of what awaits us on the other side of Revelations"--

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.1)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 3
3.5 3
4 6
4.5 4
5 7

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,691,142 books! | Top bar: Always visible