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Ain't Gonna Be the Same Fool Twice by April…
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Ain't Gonna Be the Same Fool Twice

by April Sinclair

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I almost didn't read this because I disliked its predecessor so much, but it was the last book in my library stack and it's not about twelve-year-olds. It was a substantial improvement, anyway, although many of the fundamental flaws are still there.

The characters are still pretty much one-dimensional, although they're not quite as cardboard-cutout as in the previous book. (And make no mistake, this is a sequel - it's just the next five years of the same character's life.) Since it's set in San Francisco in the mid-seventies rather than Chicago in the late 60s, they tend to be hippie or queer stereotypes rather than inner-city ones, which is, well, it's different, anyway. There are still at least a few one-shot "here's a scene to show what racism/sexism/homophobia is like" that don't really fit in the narrative at all, but they're not as constant. The writing is definitely defter, which made it a more pleasant read.

It's also still a pretty formless book. The touching scene at the end is nice and all, but there's still really no plot, as such. I like plot. I know that makes me plebian. I'm not sorry. ( )
  JeremyPreacher | Mar 30, 2013 |
About six months ago I read "Coffee Will Make You Black", which was a coming of age story set in the late 60s and early 70s in a poor black Chicago neighborhood. Stevie Stevenson told the story, and a little of the book was devoted to her questioning her own sexuality. "Ain't Gonna Be the Same Fool Twice" is a sequal. Stevie is a few years older, and the book begins in college, and ends about a year after graduation... mostly set in San Francisco. The book touches on friendships and drug culture some, but it is primarily a memoir like tale of a young black bisexual woman, leaning to the lesbian side. Having grown up under traditional "family values", Stevie has trouble accepting herself, and is usually the polite, old fashioned person in any group of friends. April Sinclair writes well, but for me this one is no more than a three star book just because the subject of lesbian discovery in a new age town wasn't something I wanted to read a whole book about. I was expecting a book more like "Coffee Will Make You Black." If the subject matter sounds interesting to you, then I think you would like the book more than I, and rate it higher. ( )
  fingerpost | Dec 12, 2008 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0380727943, Paperback)

Jean "Stevie" Stevenson, the indomitable heroine of Coffee Will Make You Black, is back -- somewhat older and wiser, with some experience and a college degree -- diving headfirst into the hot tub, free love, yoga, and vegetarian lifestyle of 1970s San Francisco. In this liberating new world of raised consciousness, mind-expanding, and disco-dancing, a soul sister with passion and daring has room to experiment with life and love to find out who she really is.Jean "Stevie" Stevenson, the indomitable heroine of Coffee Will Make You Black, is back-somewhat older and wiser, with some experience and a college degree-diving headfirst into the hot tub, free love, yoga, and vegetarian lifestyle of 1970s San Francisco. In this liberating new world of raised consciousness, mind-expanding, and disco-dancing, a soul sister with passion and daring has room to experiment with life and love to find out who she really is.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:13 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

A young black woman explores her sexuality in the 1970s. She is Jean Stevenson of Chicago whose quest for self-discovery begins in college by an affair with a lesbian. On graduation, she moves to San Francisco where she has more affairs, including one with a gay. The novel recreates the obsessions of the times--free love, drugs, war protest and women's consciousness-raising groups. By the author of Coffee Will Make You Black.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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