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Liddell and Scott: The History, Methodology, and Languages of the World's…

by Christopher Stray (Editor), Michael Clarke (Editor), Joshua T. Katz (Editor)

Other authors: Evelien Bracke (Contributor), David Butterfield (Contributor), James Clackson (Contributor), Amy Coker (Contributor), John Considine (Contributor)13 more, Elizabeth Craik (Contributor), David Goldstein (Contributor), Patrick James (Contributor), Mark Janse (Contributor), Tom Mackenzie (Contributor), Michael Meier-Brügger (Contributor), Philomen Probert (Contributor), Christopher Rowe (Contributor), Michael Silk (Contributor), Anne Thompson (Contributor), Brent Vine (Contributor), Martin L. West (Contributor), Margaret Williamson (Contributor)

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The Greek-English Lexicon of Liddell and Scott is one of the most famous dictionaries in the world, and for the past century-and-a-half has been a constant and indispensable presence in teaching, learning, and research on ancient Greek throughout the English-speaking world and beyond. Despite continuous modification and updating, it is still recognizably a Victorian creation; at the same time, however, it carries undiminished authority both for its account of the Greek language and for its system of organizing and presenting linguistic data. 0The present volume brings together essays by twenty-two scholars on all aspects of the history, constitution, and problematics of this extraordinary work, enabling the reader both to understand its complex history and to appreciate it as a monument to the challenges and pitfalls of classical scholarship. The contributors have combined a variety of approaches and methodologies - historical, philological, theoretical - in order to situate the book within the various disciplines to which it is relevant, from semantics, lexicography, and historical linguistics, to literary theory, Victorian studies, and the history of the book. Paying tribute to the Lexicon's enormous effect on the evolving theory and practice of lexicography, it also includes a section looking forward to new developments in dictionary-making in the digital age, bringing comprehensively up to date the question of what the future holds for this fascinating and perplexing monument to the challenges of understanding an ancient language.… (more)
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Liddell and Scott, edited by Christopher Stray, a sociologist, Michael Clarke, a literary critic, and Joshua Katz, an expert in linguistics, aims to look at the LSJ as cultural and intellectual product—with Stray leading on the history of the book; Clarke, the methodology and literary implications; and Katz, the philology and linguistics. It is a book that is fascinating—full of detailed and intelligent appraisal and analysis—and frustrating, for the questions not broached and the avenues not pursued. The twenty-one chapters of the book, mainly by very senior figures in the field of classics, are organized into four sections, namely, the history and constitution of the lexicon; what the periods and genres of evidence are for the lexicon (which continues the first section with a slightly different trajectory); the lexicon’s methodology and its problems – the most hard-hitting section; and – the most catch-all and least satisfactory section – comparisons in time and space: this is far too grand a title for what contains the thinnest and the most blinkered material, which at no point considers a proper frame of comparison with lexica outside classics, except for a brief final trot through a connection with the OED, nor does it move outside the nineteenth or early twentieth century.
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Stray, ChristopherEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Clarke, MichaelEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Katz, Joshua T.Editormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Bracke, EvelienContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Butterfield, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Clackson, JamesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Coker, AmyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Considine, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Craik, ElizabethContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Goldstein, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
James, PatrickContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Janse, MarkContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mackenzie, TomContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Meier-Brügger, MichaelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Probert, PhilomenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rowe, ChristopherContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Silk, MichaelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Thompson, AnneContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Vine, BrentContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
West, Martin L.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Williamson, MargaretContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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The Greek-English Lexicon of Liddell and Scott is one of the most famous dictionaries in the world, and for the past century-and-a-half has been a constant and indispensable presence in teaching, learning, and research on ancient Greek throughout the English-speaking world and beyond. Despite continuous modification and updating, it is still recognizably a Victorian creation; at the same time, however, it carries undiminished authority both for its account of the Greek language and for its system of organizing and presenting linguistic data. 0The present volume brings together essays by twenty-two scholars on all aspects of the history, constitution, and problematics of this extraordinary work, enabling the reader both to understand its complex history and to appreciate it as a monument to the challenges and pitfalls of classical scholarship. The contributors have combined a variety of approaches and methodologies - historical, philological, theoretical - in order to situate the book within the various disciplines to which it is relevant, from semantics, lexicography, and historical linguistics, to literary theory, Victorian studies, and the history of the book. Paying tribute to the Lexicon's enormous effect on the evolving theory and practice of lexicography, it also includes a section looking forward to new developments in dictionary-making in the digital age, bringing comprehensively up to date the question of what the future holds for this fascinating and perplexing monument to the challenges of understanding an ancient language.

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