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Cuckoo's Egg (Alliance-Union Universe) by C.…
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Cuckoo's Egg (Alliance-Union Universe) (edition 1985)

by C. J. Cherryh (Author)

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9971221,373 (3.94)68
Cuckoo's Egg is a novel by science fiction and fantasy author C. J. Cherryh, set in her Alliance-Union universe. It was nominated for the Hugo Award and longlisted the Locus Award for Best Novel. It was later included, along with Cherryh's novel Serpent's Reach, in the 2005 omnibus volume The Deep Beyond. The audiobook introduces the alien Shonunin race, and the plot of the novel concerns a male Shonun raising a human boy. They named him Thorn. They told him he was of their people, although he was so different. He was ugly in their eyes, strange, sleek-skinned instead of furred, clawless, different. Yet he was of their power class: judge-warriors, the elite, the fighters, the defenders. Thorn knew that his difference was somehow very important--but not important enough to prevent murderous conspiracies against him, against his protector, against his caste, and perhaps against the peace of the world. But when the crunch came, when Thorn finally learned what his true role in life was to be, that the future of two worlds might hinge on him, then he had to stand alone to justify his very existence.… (more)
Member:yamanote
Title:Cuckoo's Egg (Alliance-Union Universe)
Authors:C. J. Cherryh (Author)
Info:DAW (1985), 319 pages
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Cuckoo's Egg by C. J. Cherryh

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» See also 68 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
There were an uncomfortable amount of references to the main character's genitals.
Also kept thinking the book was going to start having any kind of plot, but there's no over-arching anything. Except that the main character doesn't know what's expected of him and nobody really tells him anything. ( )
  EmberMantles | Jan 1, 2024 |
One of my favorite books. I've begged Ms. Cherryh for a sequel. I love the way that the human boy is the alien. I loved the warrior culture. I would love to see the hero deal with the incomming humans. ( )
  Luziadovalongo | Jul 14, 2022 |
This is one I re-read every several years. Cherryh is an incredible alien and world-creator. Scifi at its best as it teaches us about us. ( )
1 vote bookwren | Mar 29, 2020 |
As the best stories do, this one begins in darkness and sheds filaments of light in tiny fragments. Piece by piece, the puzzle slides into place. In many ways, I empathized with Thorn's situation because, as the reader, I felt as though Cherryh was in the role of Dunn and I was Thorn - constantly wondering what was really going on and confused about where we were going. The prose can be bit difficult at times but the payoff is well worth the journey. Excellent, excellent story-telling and wonderfully rendered characters. ( )
  ScoLgo | Nov 26, 2019 |
Note to Self: never pick up a CJ Cherryh book, that is close to being finished, near bedtime...

This is a reread, at least I think it is, but aside from a positive feeling when I saw the cover, I have NO recollection of any of the plot or characters. I still have a positive feeling, but now I can elaborate WHY.

Thorn is different: smooth skinned, immobile ears, and in other physical attributes, but the respected warrior Duun raises him from infancy, with patience, and affection. As Thorn grows, he is taught a Way, the Way of the Hatani, the warrior-judging class, despite his appearance, despite his obviously not being the same species as those around him. Dunn has his reasons to raise Thorn in this manner, reasons that eventually will come to light when Thorn grows old enough to be seen as a threat to some, a danger to those who would not hesitate to use assassination against him.

Excellent story, well-developed characters, and a twisted plot that does not reveal itself fully until the final pages. Highly recommended. ( )
2 vote fuzzi | Mar 15, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
C. J. Cherryhprimary authorall editionscalculated
Asplund, RandallCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whelan,MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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He sat in a room, the sand of which was synthetic and shining with opal tints, fine and light beneath his bare feet.
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"There are three kinds of people I've found: those who think the universe is good, those who believe it's corrupt, and those who don't want to think about it any more than they can help. I prefer the first two. The last can be hired by anybody."
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Cuckoo's Egg is a novel by science fiction and fantasy author C. J. Cherryh, set in her Alliance-Union universe. It was nominated for the Hugo Award and longlisted the Locus Award for Best Novel. It was later included, along with Cherryh's novel Serpent's Reach, in the 2005 omnibus volume The Deep Beyond. The audiobook introduces the alien Shonunin race, and the plot of the novel concerns a male Shonun raising a human boy. They named him Thorn. They told him he was of their people, although he was so different. He was ugly in their eyes, strange, sleek-skinned instead of furred, clawless, different. Yet he was of their power class: judge-warriors, the elite, the fighters, the defenders. Thorn knew that his difference was somehow very important--but not important enough to prevent murderous conspiracies against him, against his protector, against his caste, and perhaps against the peace of the world. But when the crunch came, when Thorn finally learned what his true role in life was to be, that the future of two worlds might hinge on him, then he had to stand alone to justify his very existence.

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