HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

You Brought Me The Ocean (Aqualad) (2020)

by Alex Sanchez, Julie Maroh (Illustrator)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Aqualad

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
7912284,345 (4.02)None
The voices that shaped LGBTQ Young Adult literature, Lambda Award-Winning author Alex Sanchez (Rainbow Boys) and New York Times bestselling illustrator Julie Maroh (Blue Is the Warmest Color), present a new coming-out romance set against the backdrop of the DC Universe. Jake Hyde doesn't swim--not since his father drowned. Luckily, he lives in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which is in the middle of the desert. And yet he yearns for the ocean and is determined to leave his hometown for a college on the coast. But his best friend, Maria, wants nothing more than to make a home in the desert, and Jake's mother encourages him to always play it safe. But there's nothing "safe" about Jake's future--not when he's attracted to Kenny Liu, swim team captain and rebel against conformity. And certainly not when he secretly applies to Miami University. Jake's life becomes a reflection of the name of his small town--does he live his truth and face the consequences? Jake is full of secrets, including the strange blue markings on his skin that glow when in contact with water. What power will he find when he searches for his identity, and will he turn his back to the current or dive headfirst into the waves?… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
You Brought Me The Ocean is an amazing story set in the DC universe. Jake is a Black teen who struggles with his identity, dreaming of being a marine biologist in the New Mexico dessert. He wants to go to a college on the coast, but his mother and best friend are holding him in the stifling dessert. On top of this, he struggles with feelings for Kenny, the popular swimmer at school. The comic is the story of Jake learning about himself and being honest with what he feels and what he wants; the identity of his father, his magical powers, his feelings for another boy, all in a beautifully heartbreaking package. And don't worry, it has a happy ending.

Even though it wouldn't make a great read aloud as a comic book, this would be a great addition to a classroom bookshelf. Sexuality, deciding about the future, problems with friends, not knowing who you are; these are all issues middle level students can experience, and the incorporation of the superhero aspect could interest students who don't particularly care to read. With the aspect of water, marine biology, eco systems, and fish in the story, it has strong ties to the Science curriculum. ( )
  Francesca_Fergason | Nov 16, 2021 |
You Brought Me the Ocean is an origin story for Aqualad, this time as a gay Black teen living in the US Southwest. So many secrets. His mother's been keeping him away for water his entire life, but why? What are the "birthmarks" on his arms and why do they glow when exposed to water? Is he gay? Why does everyone think he's dating his best friend Maria? And is it time to talk to the only out gay guy at school? Or do more than talk?

Long-time readers of queer comics will be familiar with Julie Maroh's art. Soft lines and a pencils and watercolor feel. Subdued colors. Lots of longing looks. This was my first time reading anything by Alex Sanchez, however, and I was pleased.

Jake (Aqualad) falls for Kenny, a Chinese-American boy with green hair and a conservative dad who uses a wheelchair. Kenny feels trapped in town because if he leaves his father will be managing the local inn alone since his mother passed away years ago. He's the only out gay kid and that's also isolating, even if he has some friends. The romance between Jake and Kenny is complicated but felt true and deep.

Readers should know that You Brought Me the Ocean is heavy on homophobia, including some actual gay-bashing. Jake's long-time best friend is Mexican-American and she's been waiting for years for Jake to finally want to date her. She's initially angry when she finds Jake and Kenny kissing, but it's not homophobia so much as really hurt feelings based on an assumption she never should have made.

They're all seniors in high school, which adds another element of uncertainty to the story. I'm not sure about you, but my family decided that when I was 18, I got to know all the messy family business and this felt a bit like that. (Why is it that everyone wants to turn your life completely upside down when you're already in a period of massive transition?)

In all, this book is beautifully illustrated and a bit heart-breaking but ultimately a loving and hopeful origin story for a young man destined for great things.

***

Content Warnings: homophobia, bullying, assault

Suzanne received a copy of this book from the publisher for review. ( )
  Cerestheories | Nov 8, 2021 |
Jake Hyde has an overprotective mother that smothers him. He has a best friend who is in love with him. Jake wants to leave his landlocked town to study oceanography in college. The ocean calls to him. It tuns out Jake is a genetically modified Black boy, and the son of the evil ecoterrorist Black Manta. As he comes to terms with his homosexuality and academic future, Jake must now contend with the fact he has the power to control water. This beautifully inked and written graphic novel captures the ups and downs of first love, bullying, growing apart, and declaring independence. It was lovely to see such a diverse cast of teens--a plump and Mexican girl, a Chinese American boy, and an African-American boy. ( )
  RakishaBPL | Sep 24, 2021 |
I need more of this story!!!!!

You Brought Me The Ocean is a DC comic origin story for Jake Hyde, aka Aqualad. I'll be upfront, I did not know that when I picked up the book. While this is meant to serve as an origin story, you don't need to know anything about his comic book arc to understand and appreciate the story. The story is all about identity, and the search for your true self that is such a huge part of the teenage experience.
Jake has a few things that sets him apart. He is the child of a single mother with a father who drowned before he could remember. He has a strange birthmark on his arms that he does his best to hide from others. He dreams of escaping his New Mexico home to find solace near the ocean. But most importantly, Jake is gay, but afraid to tell anyone. All of these different aspects of Jake's identity are what make him who he is, and slowly throughout the story they all come together and help put the missing pieces of his life together to show him the man he is to be.
The illustrations by Julie Maroh are stunning. There are lots of little things she does, especially with color choice, that not only make the novel *look* gorgeous, but also adds a stunning new layer to the story.
While this is technically a superhero origin story, the superhero aspect is not always front-and-center. It is a very relatable story about a teen trying to figure out who he is and who are the people who will stick by him. ( )
  Chinesa72 | Jul 28, 2021 |
I enjoyed this. I really liked the art style and I thought that Jake was a very compelling protagonist. However, I thought the romance felt very rushed, and I was honestly more interested in the friendship plotline. Overall, I would recommend it if you are looking for a good lgbt+ graphic novel. ( )
  queenofthebobs | May 23, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sanchez, AlexAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Maroh, JulieIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Bennett, DeronLetterer.secondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
For as long as I can remember, I've dreamed of another world.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

The voices that shaped LGBTQ Young Adult literature, Lambda Award-Winning author Alex Sanchez (Rainbow Boys) and New York Times bestselling illustrator Julie Maroh (Blue Is the Warmest Color), present a new coming-out romance set against the backdrop of the DC Universe. Jake Hyde doesn't swim--not since his father drowned. Luckily, he lives in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which is in the middle of the desert. And yet he yearns for the ocean and is determined to leave his hometown for a college on the coast. But his best friend, Maria, wants nothing more than to make a home in the desert, and Jake's mother encourages him to always play it safe. But there's nothing "safe" about Jake's future--not when he's attracted to Kenny Liu, swim team captain and rebel against conformity. And certainly not when he secretly applies to Miami University. Jake's life becomes a reflection of the name of his small town--does he live his truth and face the consequences? Jake is full of secrets, including the strange blue markings on his skin that glow when in contact with water. What power will he find when he searches for his identity, and will he turn his back to the current or dive headfirst into the waves?

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.02)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 5
3.5
4 13
4.5 3
5 8

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 170,281,016 books! | Top bar: Always visible