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Postcolonial Love Poem by Natalie Diaz
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Postcolonial Love Poem (edition 2020)

by Natalie Diaz (Author)

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1995115,239 (4.21)38
Natalie Diaz's highly anticipated follow-up toWhen My Brother Was an Aztec, winner of an American Book Award Postcolonial Love Poem is an anthem of desire against erasure. Natalie Diaz's brilliant second collection demands that every body carried in its pages--bodies of language, land, rivers, suffering brothers, enemies, and lovers--be touched and held as beloveds. Through these poems, the wounds inflicted by America onto an indigenous people are allowed to bloom pleasure and tenderness: "Let me call my anxiety,desire, then. / Let me call it,a garden." In this new lyrical landscape, the bodies of indigenous, Latinx, black, and brown women are simultaneously the body politic and the body ecstatic. In claiming this autonomy of desire, language is pushed to its dark edges, the astonishing dunefields and forests where pleasure and love are both grief and joy, violence and sensuality. Diaz defies the conditions from which she writes, a nation whose creation predicated the diminishment and ultimate erasure of bodies like hers and the people she loves: "I am doing my best to not become a museum / of myself. I am doing my best to breathe in and out. // I am begging:Let me be lonely but not invisible."Postcolonial Love Poem unravels notions of American goodness and creates something more powerful than hope--in it, a future is built, future being a matrix of the choices we make now, and in these poems, Diaz chooses love.… (more)
Member:kerryfine
Title:Postcolonial Love Poem
Authors:Natalie Diaz (Author)
Info:Graywolf (2020), 120 pages
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Postcolonial Love Poem by Natalie Diaz

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Showing 5 of 5
A wonderful collection of poetry deeply steeped in the author's Native American heritage. The poems here have a wide variety of subject matter. Some are environmental in nature, some involve her family with a sports bent and sensual love poems that exalt in the exploration of her lovers body. I love the variety of length, depth and structure from poem to poem. I certainly can see why this collection received all the acclaim that it did. I loved it. ( )
  muddyboy | Nov 17, 2021 |
This won the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. It was justly deserving.

Natalie Diaz’s poems are filled with life: being a part of the whole of the earth, especially the Colorado River.

But she also unflinchingly looks at her brother’s addiction and the ruin it has brought to his life.

Some are uncomfortable for me – I count sexual encounters as intensely private but she fearlessly explores them with the woman she loves.

My favorite poem is “The First Water is the Body”. It’s a long poem, but the poem in its entirety can be read here:

https://orionmagazine.org/article/women-standing-rock/ ( )
  streamsong | Jun 30, 2021 |
Longlisted for the National Book Award for Poetry 2020

Diaz is an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Tribe and grew up at Fort Mohave Indian Village near Needles. She is now a professor of poetry at ASU.

This book includes poems focusing on a a few themes: being indigenous, love/loving, the Southwest deserts, her brother and family, and physicality. She uses certain vocabulary a lot--minerals/rocks, bones and body parts, Greek characters and terms. I had a few favorite poems, but for many I felt like I was missing something. In the Notes she explains the origins of many of the poems, which reflect songs I don' know, or work I have not read or read long enough ago that I don't recognize it. In many ways this book felt like the intended audience are very literate poets/students who read, critique, and review each others' work. A pod of poets, you might say.

My favorites: The Mustangs (about her brother playing high school basketball); The First Water is the Body (reflections on Mohave belief that they are part of the Colorado/it is part of them--not in metaphor); If I Should Come Upon Your House Lonely in the West Texas Desert (magnificent language--"I will swing my lasso of headlights/ across your front porch".

I need to read her earlier collection, When My Brother Was an Aztec, I think I might like it more. ( )
  Dreesie | Dec 5, 2020 |
An extraordinary book of poetry. The kind of poetry that gets into your lungs like pure oxygen and makes you feel ready to fly. ( )
  archangelsbooks | Sep 5, 2020 |
Natalie Diaz is back! I tore through this collection, expecting to be impressed, humbled, and she delivered. While it didn't have the same thematic coherence as When My Brother Was an Aztec, there is a profound interrogation of her identity and experience and poems that slide into erotic mythology between eddies of sampled texts.
  b.masonjudy | May 24, 2020 |
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Natalie Diaz's highly anticipated follow-up toWhen My Brother Was an Aztec, winner of an American Book Award Postcolonial Love Poem is an anthem of desire against erasure. Natalie Diaz's brilliant second collection demands that every body carried in its pages--bodies of language, land, rivers, suffering brothers, enemies, and lovers--be touched and held as beloveds. Through these poems, the wounds inflicted by America onto an indigenous people are allowed to bloom pleasure and tenderness: "Let me call my anxiety,desire, then. / Let me call it,a garden." In this new lyrical landscape, the bodies of indigenous, Latinx, black, and brown women are simultaneously the body politic and the body ecstatic. In claiming this autonomy of desire, language is pushed to its dark edges, the astonishing dunefields and forests where pleasure and love are both grief and joy, violence and sensuality. Diaz defies the conditions from which she writes, a nation whose creation predicated the diminishment and ultimate erasure of bodies like hers and the people she loves: "I am doing my best to not become a museum / of myself. I am doing my best to breathe in and out. // I am begging:Let me be lonely but not invisible."Postcolonial Love Poem unravels notions of American goodness and creates something more powerful than hope--in it, a future is built, future being a matrix of the choices we make now, and in these poems, Diaz chooses love.

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