HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

To Build a Fire by Jack London
Loading...

To Build a Fire (original 1902; edition 2003)

by Jack London (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,1132318,027 (3.83)34
"To Build a Fire," the best-known of Jack London's many short stories, tells the tale of a solitary traveler on the Yukon Trail accompanied only by his dog as they endure the extreme cold. A classic narrative of a battle for survival against the forces of nature, "To Build a Fire" is London at his best. Also included here are "The Red One," "All Gold Canyon," "A Piece of Steak," "The Love of Life," "Flush of Gold," "The Story of Keesh," and "The Wisdom of the Trail." A vital collection of works by one of the greatest short-story writers in American literature, this edition is sure to delight audiences of all ages.… (more)
Member:iSatyajeet
Title:To Build a Fire
Authors:Jack London (Author)
Info:Wolf Creek Books (2003), 32 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

Work Information

To Build a Fire and Other Stories by Jack London (1902)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 34 mentions

English (18)  Spanish (2)  French (2)  Italian (1)  All languages (23)
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
A fantastic short story, with no wasted pages, or even a wasted sentence. In it, London crafts a story about the arrogance of man, and the brutality of nature. His writing about Survival is superb, and it builds and builds to an inevitable climax that is both expected, and somehow shocking at the same time. ( )
  Andjhostet | Jul 4, 2023 |
I haven’t previously read anything by Jack London.



I didn’t like this story, about a man making a trip in the snow at a very low temperature, fifty degrees below zero, he thought. Actually, it was seventy-five below zero.



The unnamed man had his dog with him, a husky, which didn’t have a name either.



It was dangerous to walk this trail alone because of the extreme cold.



The author tells us that the man’s problem was that he lacked imagination.



The dog knew it “was no time for traveling”. It was wiser than the man.



The man knew that sometimes he had to light a fire in order to warm himself, and he did at least once.



A few mishaps occurred and, finally, he was unable to light the necessary fire because of his frozen, numb hands.



I lost sympathy for the man when he considered killing the dog so he could put his hands inside the corpse in order to thaw them.



The man had apparently undertaken this hazardous trip on his own to prove to himself that he was a real man. “Any man who was a man would travel alone.”



The story did not end well.



It was well told, absolutely – I just didn’t like the theme or the man himself. ( )
  IonaS | Oct 5, 2022 |
Oh my goodness, I have not felt the cold like this since I watched Dr. Zhivago and wanted to help get the ice out of Omar Shariff's beard. Fantastic descriptions that make you shiver with cold and fear. ( )
  mattorsara | Aug 11, 2022 |
Way too suspenseful for its length, great read. ( )
  RandomCitizens | Jan 9, 2021 |
A good collection of short stories from an early master of the modern American style, but none are really essential to the contemporary reader. The titular story, 'To Build a Fire', is one of the best, with a style and setting that will be familiar to those who have read Jack London's two most famous works, The Call of the Wild and White Fang. The cold bites into you.

In the Dover Thrift edition, this story is accompanied by a number of others of varying quality. None are poor but few are remarkable either. Regarding the large chunk of stories immediately following the titular opener – 'To the Man on Trail', 'The Law of Life', 'The God of His Fathers', 'All Gold Canyon', 'The Chinago', 'Mauki' and 'The Heathen' – I can take them or leave them. They are all rather dated, though 'All Gold Canyon' has a musty, frontiersman vibe that is still welcome.

The two boxing stories, 'A Piece of Steak' and 'The Mexican', are excellent. The sport seems to lend itself well to a pacy, blow-by-blow style, while its masculine, hard-luck nature is meat and drink for writers like London (see also Hemingway). 'A Piece of Steak' is particularly good, perhaps the finest story in this collection.

These are followed by 'The Pearls of Parlay', a strange story with an engrossing hurricane set-piece, and 'War', a nice, concise story about the vagaries of war which joins 'To Build a Fire' and 'A Piece of Steak' as one of the jewels here. The collection ends with 'Told in the Drooling Ward', another strange but affecting tale – something that is nice but doesn't linger.

In summary, Jack London is always an interesting writer, but only the reputations of The Call of the Wild and White Fang have survived into modern times and, from what I have read since, there is no real reason to revise this. ( )
1 vote MikeFutcher | Jul 31, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
35 livres cultes à lire au moins une fois dans sa vie
Quels sont les romans qu'il faut avoir lu absolument ? Un livre culte qui transcende, fait réfléchir, frissonner, rire ou pleurer… La littérature est indéniablement créatrice d’émotions. Si vous êtes adeptes des classiques, ces titres devraient vous plaire.
De temps en temps, il n'y a vraiment rien de mieux que de se poser devant un bon bouquin, et d'oublier un instant le monde réel. Mais si vous êtes une grosse lectrice ou un gros lecteur, et que vous avez épuisé le stock de votre bibliothèque personnelle, laissez-vous tenter par ces quelques classiques de la littérature.
 

» Add other authors (15 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jack Londonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Sapienza, DavideTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Day had broken cold and grey, exceedingly cold and grey, when the man turned aside from the main Yukon trail and climbed the high earth-bank, where a dim and little-travelled trail led eastward through the fat spruce timberland.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This short collection contains only three stories:

To build a fire

The Chinago

Love of life.


Please do not combine it with any of the much longer works with the same name. This work should have the ISBN 0146000978; there is one copy combined here which has the Penguin 60s title but an incorrect ISBN, which has pulled in an incorrect cover.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

"To Build a Fire," the best-known of Jack London's many short stories, tells the tale of a solitary traveler on the Yukon Trail accompanied only by his dog as they endure the extreme cold. A classic narrative of a battle for survival against the forces of nature, "To Build a Fire" is London at his best. Also included here are "The Red One," "All Gold Canyon," "A Piece of Steak," "The Love of Life," "Flush of Gold," "The Story of Keesh," and "The Wisdom of the Trail." A vital collection of works by one of the greatest short-story writers in American literature, this edition is sure to delight audiences of all ages.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
This "Penguin 60s" edition of this title does not include 25 stories, or "introduction, biographical note, and afterword by David Lubar." It includes only 3 of London's stories: To Build a Fire, The Chinago, and Love of Life (which is called "Love of Live" in the table of contents.)
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.83)
0.5
1 7
1.5
2 11
2.5 4
3 51
3.5 10
4 78
4.5 4
5 65

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 204,234,892 books! | Top bar: Always visible