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Master of Djinn, A (Dead Djinn Universe, 1)…
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Master of Djinn, A (Dead Djinn Universe, 1) (edition 2022)

by P Djeli Clark (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6714229,077 (3.93)75
'Clever, wickedly fun . . . with an excellent balance of humour and heart. I loved it' S. A. Chakraborty, author of The City of Brass Cairo, 1912: Though Fatma el-Sha'arawi is the youngest woman working for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities, she's certainly not a rookie, especially after preventing the destruction of the universe last summer. So when someone murders a secret brotherhood dedicated to one of the most famous men in history, Al-Jahiz, Agent Fatma is called onto the case. Al-Jahiz transformed the world fifty years ago when he opened up the veil between the magical and mundane realms, before vanishing into the unknown. This murderer claims to be Al-Jahiz, returned to condemn the modern age for its social oppressions. His dangerous magical abilities instigate unrest in the streets of Cairo that threaten to spill over onto the global stage. Alongside her Ministry colleagues and a familiar person from her past, Agent Fatma must unravel the mystery behind this imposter to restore peace to the city - or face the possibility he could be exactly who he seems . . . P. Djèlí Clark is the winner of the Nebula, Locus, and Alex Awards and has been shortlisted for the Hugo Award.… (more)
Member:attolia
Title:Master of Djinn, A (Dead Djinn Universe, 1)
Authors:P Djeli Clark (Author)
Info:Tordotcom (2022), 448 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***1/2
Tags:2022, fiction, fantasy, steampunk, audio

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A Master of Djinn by P. Djèlí Clark

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» See also 75 mentions

English (37)  French (1)  All languages (38)
Showing 1-5 of 37 (next | show all)
A fantastic fantasy detective book set in Egypt, filled with magic and folklore. The story follows an agent in a magical branch of the ministry, as they try to discover and catch a mass murderer and magical beings. It is a great story, with great characters. It is set in the same universe as P. Djeli Clark's novellas, so if you have read and enjoyed those, you will definitely enjoy this novel. ( )
  renbedell | Aug 23, 2022 |
Set in the same alternate universe the author built for [b:The Haunting of Tram Car 015|36546128|The Haunting of Tram Car 015 (Dead Djinn Universe, #0.3)|P. Djèlí Clark|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1537226167l/36546128._SY75_.jpg|58277622], and revisiting some of the same characters, this book was fun to read.

The setting is early 20th century Egypt, steampunk with djinns, angels and a bunch of "other realm" beings in the mix.

The main character is Fatma, one of the few female investigators in an agency charged with monitoring the "new" supernatural beings. The story line is Fatma's investigation of an elaborate series of crimes, but the real joy of this book is the writing, the setting, and the characters.

Loved this book and can't wait for the next one! ( )
  sriddell | Aug 6, 2022 |
Quite entertaining - a refreshing change from much of the recent fantasy being published. ( )
  KatyBee | Jul 30, 2022 |
I have loved Clark's Dead Djinn Universe since reading The Haunting of Tram Car 015 (quickly followed by the other stories in the universe). This full-length novel is no exception! It was a lot of fun to read, and had the perfect amount of mystery to it. I especially appreciated that I figured out the puzzle (using clues, not guesses) just before Fatma did. It's always nice when an author gives the reader enough clues to solve the mystery, but not so many that the MC seems slow in comparison.

This is a highly enjoyable novel, and while you don't need to read any of the shorter pieces that come before it before picking up this book, I personally liked the little nods to those stories that I found since I *had* already read them. That extra knowledge, though, is a bonus and not at all necessary if you don't want to start with the short stories.

As with the prior installments in this universe, the focus is on setting and plot, and not characters. While we do get some minor character development in this novel, it seems that it's usually plot-driven development and not the other way around. This isn't a problem, especially if you're aware of it going in, but it might help manage expectations about what this novel is going to deliver. ( )
  ca.bookwyrm | Jul 15, 2022 |
This novel is set in the world of the Egyptian Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments, and Supernatural Entities, where djinn and other creatures are active in early twentieth-century Cairo. This is Clark's fourth piece of fiction in this setting, but first novel; one of the earlier ones, The Haunting of Tram Car 015, was a Hugo finalist in 2020.

It's a police procedural set in a government agency devoted to the supernatural; a "master of djinn" purports to return, dozens of British residents in a secret society are dead, and Ministry agent Fatma el-Sha'arawi is on the case. I found it occasionally charming but often a plod; there are too many dull fight scenes, and as a mystery, it's not very satisfying. There are no red herrings: pretty much the only person you suspect to have done it, has done it. But it takes Fatma far too much time to work this out, and it usually felt like she didn't really work anything out, actually; people would tell her things. A bit too much of the plot turns on somewhat obscure details of relationships between magical beings.

I feel a bit disappointed, in that the idea of a government department devoted to the supernatural could have a fun collision of rationality and irrationality. How does a government standardize something that by nature cannot be standardizes? But Clark's magical entities don't really feel, well, magical, and the story doesn't do anything with this idea. I mean, I guess it didn't have to, but maybe it would have been about something if it had. On the basis of some of Clark's other Hugo finalists over the years (e.g., Ring Shout) he is capable of more interesting work than this, which like so many other Tordotcom novellas, feels more like the pilot for a streaming show than a work of prose fiction.

It was fun. It you handed this to me and said, "I think you will enjoy this," I probably would, but unfortunately, it is a Hugo finalist, which means it was handed to me with the statement, "This is one of the best six science fiction/fantasy novels of the year," and that I found difficult to believe, and thus my enjoyment was diminished.
  Stevil2001 | Jul 1, 2022 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
P. Djèlí Clarkprimary authorall editionscalculated
Foltzer, ChristineCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hong, KevinIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Martiniere, StephanCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Claudette,
who many others called Liz, and I just called Mom.
Thanks for all those library visits.
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Archibald James Portendorf disliked stairs.
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'Clever, wickedly fun . . . with an excellent balance of humour and heart. I loved it' S. A. Chakraborty, author of The City of Brass Cairo, 1912: Though Fatma el-Sha'arawi is the youngest woman working for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities, she's certainly not a rookie, especially after preventing the destruction of the universe last summer. So when someone murders a secret brotherhood dedicated to one of the most famous men in history, Al-Jahiz, Agent Fatma is called onto the case. Al-Jahiz transformed the world fifty years ago when he opened up the veil between the magical and mundane realms, before vanishing into the unknown. This murderer claims to be Al-Jahiz, returned to condemn the modern age for its social oppressions. His dangerous magical abilities instigate unrest in the streets of Cairo that threaten to spill over onto the global stage. Alongside her Ministry colleagues and a familiar person from her past, Agent Fatma must unravel the mystery behind this imposter to restore peace to the city - or face the possibility he could be exactly who he seems . . . P. Djèlí Clark is the winner of the Nebula, Locus, and Alex Awards and has been shortlisted for the Hugo Award.

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Cairo, 1912: Though Fatma el-Sha’arawi is the youngest woman working for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities, she’s certainly not a rookie, especially after preventing the destruction of the universe last summer.

So when someone murders a secret brotherhood dedicated to one of the most famous men in history, al-Jahiz, Agent Fatma is called onto the case. Al-Jahiz transformed the world forty years ago when he opened up the veil between the magical and mundane realms, before vanishing into the unknown. This murderer claims to be al-Jahiz, returned to condemn the modern age for its social oppressions. His dangerous magical abilities instigate unrest in the streets of Cairo that threaten to spill over onto the global stage.

Alongside her Ministry colleagues and a familiar person from her past, Agent Fatma must unravel the mystery behind this imposter to restore peace to the city—or face the possibility he could be exactly who he seems…
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