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Stella Endicott and the Anything-Is-Possible…
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Stella Endicott and the Anything-Is-Possible Poem: Tales from Deckawoo… (edition 2021)

by Kate DiCamillo (Author)

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653359,220 (4.41)1
Metaphor alert! An ode to a certain pig kicks off one wild school day in Kate DiCamillo's latest stop on Deckawoo Drive. Stella Endicott loves her teacher, Miss Liliana, and she is thrilled when the class is assigned to write a poem. Stella crafts a beautiful poem about Mercy Watson, the pig who lives next door -- a poem complete with a metaphor and full of curiosity and courage. But Horace Broom, Stella's irritating classmate, insists that Stella's poem is full of lies and that pigs do not live in houses. And when Stella and Horace get into a shouting match in the classroom, Miss Liliana banishes them to the principal's office. Will the two of them find a way to turn this opposite-of-a-poem day around? In the newest spirited outing in the Deckawoo Drive series by Kate DiCamillo, anything is possible -- even a friendship with a boy deemed to be (metaphorically speaking) an overblown balloon.… (more)
Member:FisherLibrary2001
Title:Stella Endicott and the Anything-Is-Possible Poem: Tales from Deckawoo Drive, Volume Five
Authors:Kate DiCamillo (Author)
Info:Candlewick (2021), 96 pages
Collections:Your library
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Stella Endicott and the Anything-Is-Possible Poem by Kate DiCamillo

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Stella's second-grade teacher gives the class an exciting assignment: to write a poem using a metaphor. Although Stella is proud of the poem she writes about a pig she knows, Stella's annoying, know-it-all classmate, Horace, says the poem is full of lies. When Stella and Horace argue over it, their teacher banishes them to the principal's office in Stella Endicott and the Anything-Is-Possible Poem by author Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Chris Van Dusen.

Given that this fifth children's chapter book in the Tales from Deckawoo Drive series is the first book I've read by this author, I'm late to the game.

But "better late," right? What a delightful story! I really started getting into it during the precious meltdown of one of the characters. And I laughed out loud several times through the read. I'm not sure just how funny I would've realized this story is if I'd read it as a child, but it's got some hilarious parts to it.

The story has neat-o messages for the kiddies and a wonderful ending, and the illustrations are fun and fantastic. I've got to try another of these books! ( )
  NadineC.Keels | Jul 9, 2021 |
I love Mercy Watson! Though she has a smaller role here, she is a perfect muse for Stella Endicott, a newfound poet of curiosity and courage. ( )
  bookwren | Jul 30, 2020 |
Metaphor abound in this new tale about frightening school day. It is DiCamillo’s newest Deckawoo Drive adventure.

I was already in love with the Mercy Watson characters so I knew this was going to be a fun book. If you are in second grade or have ever been in second grade I think you can certainly identify with our main characters, Stella and Horace.

Stella SuZanne Endicott loves her teacher, Miss Liliana, and she is thrilled when the class is assigned to write a poem. Stella crafts a beautiful poem about Mercy Watson, the beloved pig next door. The poem is to contain a metaphor which proves no problem for Stella. But Horace Broom, Stella’s irritating classmate, insists that Stella’s poem just wrong and her reference to the pig next door cannot be true. He insists that pigs do not live in houses and most definitely do not sit on couches. This difference results in a shouting match in the classroom. Miss Liliana sends them to the dreaded principal’s office. Along the way, the two encounter a school bully, Mr. Clyde Murphy, maintenance engineer, then the scary principal’s secretary, Mrs. Shirley. By now they are too terrified to see Mr. J. Tinwiddie school principal. Horace is more dramatic than Stella and bemoans that his life is over. As the two abscond the principal’s office there are some surprising occurrences on their journey to being readmitted to the second grade classroom.

The illustrations enhance this story of friendship and understanding. Lots of interesting vocabulary awaits the reader. ( )
  jothebookgirl | May 12, 2020 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kate DiCamilloprimary authorall editionscalculated
Van Dusen, ChrisIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
For Cindy Lou and Heller Sue -K. D.
In memory of my second-grade teacher, Mrs. Mannix. She was the best. -C. V.
First words
On Stella Endicott's first day of second grade, the teacher stood in front of the class and introduced herself.
Quotations
"A poem should probably have curiosity and courage, too," said Stella.
It is good to sit on a couch

next to a pig and listen

to a wizard play a

sad song on the accordion.

Outside, leaves are ballerinas,

dancing to the ground.

I wonder what

will happen next.

Maybe someone will call me

home.
"There's always surprises. There's always things that show up when you don't expect them. There's patterns and there's surprises, and that's good. It makes things interesting."
Stella thought, There is a metaphor for today. Today is a bouquet of dead flowers in brown water.
Stella put her hand out in the darkness. She found Horace's hand. It was small and scrabbly. She thought, Horace Broom's hand is a hermit crab without its shell, and that's a metaphor.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Metaphor alert! An ode to a certain pig kicks off one wild school day in Kate DiCamillo's latest stop on Deckawoo Drive. Stella Endicott loves her teacher, Miss Liliana, and she is thrilled when the class is assigned to write a poem. Stella crafts a beautiful poem about Mercy Watson, the pig who lives next door -- a poem complete with a metaphor and full of curiosity and courage. But Horace Broom, Stella's irritating classmate, insists that Stella's poem is full of lies and that pigs do not live in houses. And when Stella and Horace get into a shouting match in the classroom, Miss Liliana banishes them to the principal's office. Will the two of them find a way to turn this opposite-of-a-poem day around? In the newest spirited outing in the Deckawoo Drive series by Kate DiCamillo, anything is possible -- even a friendship with a boy deemed to be (metaphorically speaking) an overblown balloon.

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