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The Perfect Father: The True Story of Chris Watts, His All-American…

by John Glatt

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I received a copy of this book free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

This is my first John Glatt and I have a feeling it won't be my last. Glatt writes without an agenda and gives a blow by blow, almost minute by minute retelling of the case. The amount of research and detail included in this book was almost overwhelming. Glatt put his own voice aside to allow the voices of the family, the victims, and the assailant ring true.

This case is particularly harrowing and close to home. ( )
  SarahRita | Aug 11, 2021 |
Just the facts, ma'am. Author John Glatt does not really offer opinions on Chris Watts. At first, I found this grating. But in light of the fact that no psychological evaluation was ever done on Christopher Watts, this was probably a wise choice. Also, letting Chris and Shannon speak for themselves through texts and emails, Chris's interviews, and Shannon's prolific social media use really helps you to understand how you never really know what is going on inside of someone's head. Warning - the details of the murders themselves are horrifying. ( )
  dcoward | Jan 8, 2021 |
I'm trying to read some of the older books in my bookcases to start off the year and this one grabbed my attention. It's a well told, well researched look at Chris Watts who killed his wife and two daughters in 2018. This was a horrific unbelievable crime and the way the killer acted after the murders was unbelievable - he very calmly told his friends and family that his wife had taken the kids on a play date, he told the media that he wanted them back and hoped that they were safe - all while he knew that he had strangled them and disposed of their bodies. The police noticed immediately that his demeanor was off - he didn't really act like a distraught husband and father, instead he appeared calm and unaffected. He was their prime suspect as soon as they interviewed him. This was a very difficult book to read especially when it was about the little girls being murdered. This man is evil personified and deserves to spend the rest of his life in prison.

The book used interviews with friends and family but didn't really go into the deep reasons behind the murders. What I didn't like is that the author continually made disparaging remarks about Shanann that I felt were almost blaming her. Yes, even if there were problems in the marriage, they could have been handled without murder. ( )
  susan0316 | Jan 5, 2021 |
While this was a well researched and detailed account of Chris Watts' slaughter of his family, I was uncomfortable with the portrayal of Shanann. There is no way to know exactly what happened in the privacy of their relationship, but I found it very odd how often Shanann was described in this book as controlling. The author focuses way too much on how mean she was and how much "happier" Chris seemed when he was cheating on her before he killed her. The book is clear that Chris is guilty, but I did not feel comfortable with how sympathetically he was portrayed. ( )
  KateHonig | Dec 3, 2020 |
Trigger warning: this book contains graphic descriptions of smothering and concealment of dead bodies, including children.

This was heavy. And incredibly sad. I was fairly knowledgeable able this case, having followed it during the trial and watch documentaries about it. But reading the details of what Chris Watts did to him pregnant wife and daughters... wow. That man is a cold blooded monster. Nothing can be said to justify his actions.
This book was very well written, the details were handled with care and I feel as though everyone involved was given a fair and unbiased depiction.
My heart absolutely breaks for the families on both sides of this case. In situations like this... no one comes out okay. And this book definitely made that clear. Tragic and utterly heartbreaking, the story of Chris Watts, family annihilator, will make you sick to your stomach. Reading the details of this case will absolutely break your heart, make you angry, and leave you in complete disbelief... how can a father do the things this man did? How can a father murder his babies, with his own hands, and then go on camera pretending to plead for their safe return? Nothing within these pages is comforting. Nothing within the details of this case make sense or are justified. This is a devastating account of the tragedies that occurred. Read at your own will, this book is incredibly heavy. ( )
  KKECReads | Oct 19, 2020 |
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