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Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the…
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Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World (original 2021; edition 2021)

by Andrea Pitzer (Author)

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1102201,745 (3.76)3
Member:Andrew_Molboski
Title:Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World
Authors:Andrea Pitzer (Author)
Info:Scribner (2021), 320 pages
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Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World by Andrea Pitzer (2021)

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» See also 3 mentions

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Before reading Icebound, I was so confused about William Barents I thought he was of Bering Strait. Wrong. This is "Barents" from the Netherlands who explored the Arctic in the 1590s (!) - not far from the Middle Ages. Barents was one of the first to attempt a northeast passage from Europe to China through the Arctic. Of course such a journey with primitive equipment and knowledge was doomed, retold in glorious detail by Pitzer, but Barents and his crew were arguably the first "modern" polar explorers. Before the Arctic was unknown. After, the Arctic was a destination unto itself. Every polar expedition since traces back to Barents. When they returned home and wrote a best selling book, there was popular hunger for more. Centuries further exploration followed culminating in the golden age in the late 19th and early 20th century. Essential reading for polar literature fans, and 16th century European history. ( )
  Stbalbach | Jan 19, 2021 |
This “forgotten history” of William Barents is certainly in need of retelling. Based on two accounts of the three voyages of William Barents to Nova Zembla in the 1590s, it is required reading for all fans of Ernest Shackleton. It lays out in snappy 21st Century English the original 16th Century Dutch texts. What an amazing story. Ms Pritzer is not as accomplished a sailor as these fearless Dutchmen, but with excellent charts she recounts the three voyages in page-turning fashion. ( )
  Chalkstone | Jan 15, 2021 |
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