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Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You…
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Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know (edition 2021)

by Adam Grant (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,4152613,436 (4.03)10
Business. Psychology. Self-Improvement. Nonfiction. HTML:#1 New York Times Bestseller
 
“THIS. This is the right book for right now. Yes, learning requires focus. But, unlearning and relearning requires much more—it requires choosing courage over comfort. In Think Again, Adam Grant weaves together research and storytelling to help us build the intellectual and emotional muscle we need to stay curious enough about the world to actually change it. I’ve never felt so hopeful about what I don’t know.”
—Brené Brown, Ph.D., #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dare to Lead
The bestselling author of Give and Take and Originals examines the critical art of rethinking: learning to question your opinions and open other people's minds, which can position you for excellence at work and wisdom in life

Intelligence is usually seen as the ability to think and learn, but in a rapidly changing world, there's another set of cognitive skills that might matter more: the ability to rethink and unlearn. In our daily lives, too many of us favor the comfort of conviction over the discomfort of doubt. We listen to opinions that make us feel good, instead of ideas that make us think hard. We see disagreement as a threat to our egos, rather than an opportunity to learn. We surround ourselves with people who agree with our conclusions, when we should be gravitating toward those who challenge our thought process. The result is that our beliefs get brittle long before our bones. We think too much like preachers defending our sacred beliefs, prosecutors proving the other side wrong, and politicians campaigning for approval—and too little like scientists searching for truth. Intelligence is no cure, and it can even be a curse: being good at thinking can make us worse at rethinking. The brighter we are, the blinder to our own limitations we can become.
Organizational psychologist Adam Grant is an expert on opening other people's minds—and our own. As Wharton's top-rated professor and the bestselling author of Originals and Give and Take, he makes it one of his guiding principles to argue like he's right but listen like he's wrong. With bold ideas and rigorous evidence, he investigates how we can embrace the joy of being wrong, bring nuance to charged conversations, and build schools, workplaces, and communities of lifelong learners. You'll learn how an international debate champion wins arguments, a Black musician persuades white supremacists to abandon hate, a vaccine whisperer convinces concerned parents to immunize their children, and Adam has coaxed Yankees fans to root for the Red Sox. Think Again reveals that we don't have to believe everything we think or internalize everything we feel. It's an invitation to let go of views that are no longer serving us well and prize mental flexibility over foolish consistency. If knowledge is power, knowing what we don't know is wisdom.
… (more)
Member:reedmelissa
Title:Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know
Authors:Adam Grant (Author)
Info:Viking (2021), 320 pages
Collections:Your library
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Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know by Adam Grant

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English (24)  Finnish (1)  German (1)  All languages (26)
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
The book varies greately in quality of information and non-fiction writing approach. At times it is journalism with stories of individuals leading the “truth” of a psychological idea, at ofhers a process involving the author to discover answers, and other still studies which are presented in summary form as given ground truth.

The book reveals some interesting ideas, some more original than others. The book also gives direction for a more “scientific” apporach involving reviewing ideas all the time to establish what is good knowledge.

But there is a big problem which underlies the whole text that stopped me from taking it seriously which is that some fundamentals of scientific method are not applies in the actual knowledge presented by the book. The author says we should be ready to update our ideas based on evidence but then presents views dogmatically, without trying to illustrate counter examples, without looking at the statistics underlying this knowledge, without trying to explain to what extent these ideas are true…

Ultimately the author assumes the reader is in a fairly narrow socio-cultural-economic space. The author is talking to big companies, successful people, working on problems that are quite niche. How would this translate to a broader world population I cannot see, and if it doesn’t could it be the basic of knowledge here is not set up correctly?

I found the book very useful as an example of how well meaning scientific knowledge is presented devoid of the tools that give science the power to actually create consensus.

Very likely all these problems were part of the process of the author’s engagement with publishers and their concers of how accessible the text would be. The end chapters give a picture of how invasive publishers can be.

( )
  yates9 | Feb 28, 2024 |
Most of the book was good advice on thought processes for better knowledge and understanding psychologically. The end fizzled out for me. I will definitely copy the 30 action points for impact at the end to make notes.
Biggest takeaway was the section on persuasive listening. The learning organization had some good ideas, but didn't seem as well thought out and written. ( )
  wvlibrarydude | Jan 14, 2024 |
I really enjoyed this book! ( )
  amagsmith | Oct 25, 2023 |
You know those meetings where you think, this could have been an email, or even a fair sized sticky note? I have something similar for books where I sometimes think, “this could have been an article”. This book falls squarely into that category for me. There were certainly a few valuable insights but overall I just got the impression that the author was trying his level best to fill up space. ( )
  Autolycus21 | Oct 10, 2023 |
Some thoughtful thoughts. Nothing mind-blowing. A nice quick read. ( )
  MsTera | Oct 10, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
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Business. Psychology. Self-Improvement. Nonfiction. HTML:#1 New York Times Bestseller
 
“THIS. This is the right book for right now. Yes, learning requires focus. But, unlearning and relearning requires much more—it requires choosing courage over comfort. In Think Again, Adam Grant weaves together research and storytelling to help us build the intellectual and emotional muscle we need to stay curious enough about the world to actually change it. I’ve never felt so hopeful about what I don’t know.”
—Brené Brown, Ph.D., #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dare to Lead
The bestselling author of Give and Take and Originals examines the critical art of rethinking: learning to question your opinions and open other people's minds, which can position you for excellence at work and wisdom in life

Intelligence is usually seen as the ability to think and learn, but in a rapidly changing world, there's another set of cognitive skills that might matter more: the ability to rethink and unlearn. In our daily lives, too many of us favor the comfort of conviction over the discomfort of doubt. We listen to opinions that make us feel good, instead of ideas that make us think hard. We see disagreement as a threat to our egos, rather than an opportunity to learn. We surround ourselves with people who agree with our conclusions, when we should be gravitating toward those who challenge our thought process. The result is that our beliefs get brittle long before our bones. We think too much like preachers defending our sacred beliefs, prosecutors proving the other side wrong, and politicians campaigning for approval—and too little like scientists searching for truth. Intelligence is no cure, and it can even be a curse: being good at thinking can make us worse at rethinking. The brighter we are, the blinder to our own limitations we can become.
Organizational psychologist Adam Grant is an expert on opening other people's minds—and our own. As Wharton's top-rated professor and the bestselling author of Originals and Give and Take, he makes it one of his guiding principles to argue like he's right but listen like he's wrong. With bold ideas and rigorous evidence, he investigates how we can embrace the joy of being wrong, bring nuance to charged conversations, and build schools, workplaces, and communities of lifelong learners. You'll learn how an international debate champion wins arguments, a Black musician persuades white supremacists to abandon hate, a vaccine whisperer convinces concerned parents to immunize their children, and Adam has coaxed Yankees fans to root for the Red Sox. Think Again reveals that we don't have to believe everything we think or internalize everything we feel. It's an invitation to let go of views that are no longer serving us well and prize mental flexibility over foolish consistency. If knowledge is power, knowing what we don't know is wisdom.

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