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Corydon: A Novel by André Gide
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Corydon: A Novel (original 1920; edition 2015)

by André Gide (Author), Richard Howard (Translator)

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311570,641 (2.96)11
First published nearly one hundred years ago, André Gide's masterpiece, translated from the original French by Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Howard, draws from the disciplines of biology, philosophy, and history to support the author's assertion that homosexuality is a natural human trait At the time of his death in 1951, having won the Nobel Prize in Literature only four years prior, André Gide was considered one of the most important literary minds of the twentieth century. In Corydon, initially released anonymously in installments between 1911 and 1920, Gide speaks his most subversive and provocative truth. Citing myriad examples that span thousands of years, Gide's Socratic dialogues argue that homosexuality is natural--in fact, far more so than the social construct of exclusive heterosexuality, the act of systematically banning or ostracizing same-sex relationships. Corydon, named for the pederast character in Virgil's Eclogues, caused its author "all kinds of trouble," according to his friends, but he regarded it as his most important work. The courage, intelligence, and prescience of Gide's argument make it all the more impressive today.… (more)
Member:CodyWard
Title:Corydon: A Novel
Authors:André Gide (Author)
Other authors:Richard Howard (Translator)
Info:Open Road Media (2015), Edition: Third, 160 pages
Collections:Your library
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Corydon by André Gide (Author) (1920)

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» See also 11 mentions

English (4)  French (1)  All languages (5)
Showing 4 of 4
The first dialogue was interesting because the arguments were so like modern arguments about homosexuality. The second dialogue, consisting mostly of descriptions of animal mating habits, I found rather unfortunate and far too long. The third and fourth I felt included some of that depressing brand of gay male misogyny, which again one sometimes hears today. This was a formative text for early 20th century discussions of homosexuality, but it definitely doesn't last because Gide doesn't really transcend his own time. Gide also doesn't do much for me in general, which is why having to read so much of him for my thesis is a drag. ( )
  likecymbeline | Apr 1, 2017 |
An overly academic exercise; a piece whose place in history is slowly diminishing. ( )
  soylentgreen23 | Jul 3, 2016 |
Unsure how to rate this; in terms of literary intrigue, there isn't much-- but then again, that's not what the book was designed for. What I find fascinating is that this piece, written ca. 100 years ago, could probably still be brought into the contemporary debate on gender preferences. ( )
  KatrinkaV | Aug 4, 2011 |
Groundbreaking for its time, Gide's argument (written as a conversation between two people) is flawed in that it completely ignores the fact that lesbians exist. ( )
  tsinandali | Nov 13, 2005 |
Showing 4 of 4
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PREFACE (A l'édition de 1924, Blanche, Gallimard)

Mes amis me répètent que ce petit livre est de nature à me faire le plus grand tort. Je ne pense pas qu'il puisse me ravir aucune chose à quoi je tienne ou mieux je ne crois pas tenir beaucoup à rien de ce qu'il m'enlèvera applaudissements, décorations, honneurs, entrées dans les salons à la mode, je ne les ai jamais recherchés. [...]
PRÉFACE DE LA SECONDE ÉDITION (1920)

Je me décide après huit ans d'attente à réimprimer ce petit livre. Il parut en 1911, tiré à douze exemplaires, lesquels furent remisés dans un tiroir d'où ils ne sont pas encore sortis. [...]
PREMIER DIALOGUE

L'an 190. un scandaleux procès remit sur le tapis une fois encore l'irritante question de l'uranisme. Dans les salons et les cafés, huit jours durant, on ne parla plus de rien d'autre. Las d'entendre à ce sujet s'exclamer ou théoriser au hasard les ignorants, les butés et les sots, je souhaitai d'éclairer mon jugement et, ne reconnaissant qu'à la raison, non point au seul tempérament, le droit' de condamner ou d'absoudre, je résolus d'aller interviewer Corydon. [...]
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First published nearly one hundred years ago, André Gide's masterpiece, translated from the original French by Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Howard, draws from the disciplines of biology, philosophy, and history to support the author's assertion that homosexuality is a natural human trait At the time of his death in 1951, having won the Nobel Prize in Literature only four years prior, André Gide was considered one of the most important literary minds of the twentieth century. In Corydon, initially released anonymously in installments between 1911 and 1920, Gide speaks his most subversive and provocative truth. Citing myriad examples that span thousands of years, Gide's Socratic dialogues argue that homosexuality is natural--in fact, far more so than the social construct of exclusive heterosexuality, the act of systematically banning or ostracizing same-sex relationships. Corydon, named for the pederast character in Virgil's Eclogues, caused its author "all kinds of trouble," according to his friends, but he regarded it as his most important work. The courage, intelligence, and prescience of Gide's argument make it all the more impressive today.

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