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The New Arabian Nights by Robert Louis…
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The New Arabian Nights (original 1882; edition 2021)

by Robert Louis Stevenson (Author)

Series: New Arabian Nights (1)

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480943,645 (3.78)20
During his residence in London, the accomplished Prince Florizel of Bohemia gained the affection of all classes by the seduction of his manner and by a well-considered generosity. He was a remarkable man even by what was known of him and that was but a small part of what he actually did. Although of a placid temper in ordinary circumstances and accustomed to take the world with as much philosophy as any ploughman, the Prince of Bohemia was not without a taste for ways of life more adventurous and eccentric than that to which he was destined by his birth. Now and then, when he fell into a low humor, when there was no laughable play to witness in any of the London theaters and when the season of the year was unsuitable to those field sports in which he excelled all competitors, he would summon his confidant and Master of the Horse, Colonel Geraldine and bid him prepare himself against an evening ramble. The Master of the Horse was a young officer of a brave and even temerarious disposition. He greeted the news with delight and hastened to make ready. Long practice and a varied acquaintance of life had given him a singular facility in disguise; he could adapt not only his face and bearing, but his voice and almost his thoughts, to those of any rank, character or nation; and in this way he diverted attention from the Prince and sometimes gained admission for the pair into strange societies. . . .… (more)
Member:JoyfulMommy07
Title:The New Arabian Nights
Authors:Robert Louis Stevenson (Author)
Info:Independently published (2021), 158 pages
Collections:Your library
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New Arabian Nights by Robert Louis Stevenson (1882)

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» See also 20 mentions

English (5)  Spanish (2)  Swedish (1)  French (1)  All languages (9)
Showing 5 of 5
RLS wrote some very good stories and some very bad ones; those included in this collection are generally somewhere in between. Fairly good to kill time, not worth reading twice. ( )
  Stravaiger64 | Dec 27, 2019 |
I recall being infuriated by these stories, and the insufferable Prince Florizel, the last time I read them. But after reading a bit of Stevenson lately I gave it another go. Still intensely aggravating!
  ben_a | Mar 11, 2017 |
The Franklin Library, Pennsylvania, 1979. Hardcover. Book Condition: A near fine copy. Limited edition. Very light shelf wear to bottom edge, otherwise fine. Bound in full leatherette with gilted edges, lettering, decoration, and silk moire endpapers. Includes a loose booklet of the editor's notes.
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  Czrbr | Jun 7, 2010 |
George Sampson, who introduced this undated edition of Stevenson's stories, was careful to draw attention to what he saw as their faults of construction; but for all that, they are attractive and interesting to read more than a century after they were written. Conan Doyle and Chesterton may well have learned from Stevenson's storytelling technique - the master criminal and his opponent still have the power to draw us into the fast-moving events. Of the other stories, "The Sieur de Maletroit's Door" with its vivid evocation of a medieval past in which well-born women were, in theory at least, completely at the disposal of their male guardians, retains its power to involve the reader. ( )
1 vote gibbon | Sep 7, 2008 |
A collection of short stories written by Stevenson before he became famous, published in various magazines in the late 1870s, includes his first published fiction. Composed of two "books", the first book is a series of nested inter-related stories of diverse topics - thus the allusion to the "Arabian Knights" whose stories were also nested (other than that no connection). These stories are sometimes called the first modern English short stories, and the "nesting" technique was very cutting edge. The Suicide Club was made into a movie called "The Game of Death". ( )
1 vote Stbalbach | Jul 5, 2006 |
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» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Robert Louis Stevensonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Holloway, DavidIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thal, Herbert vanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This is the collection New Arabian Nights by Robert Louis Stevenson. Some editions have the subtitle The Suicide Club, etc.; others The Pavilion on the Links and Other Tales.
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During his residence in London, the accomplished Prince Florizel of Bohemia gained the affection of all classes by the seduction of his manner and by a well-considered generosity. He was a remarkable man even by what was known of him and that was but a small part of what he actually did. Although of a placid temper in ordinary circumstances and accustomed to take the world with as much philosophy as any ploughman, the Prince of Bohemia was not without a taste for ways of life more adventurous and eccentric than that to which he was destined by his birth. Now and then, when he fell into a low humor, when there was no laughable play to witness in any of the London theaters and when the season of the year was unsuitable to those field sports in which he excelled all competitors, he would summon his confidant and Master of the Horse, Colonel Geraldine and bid him prepare himself against an evening ramble. The Master of the Horse was a young officer of a brave and even temerarious disposition. He greeted the news with delight and hastened to make ready. Long practice and a varied acquaintance of life had given him a singular facility in disguise; he could adapt not only his face and bearing, but his voice and almost his thoughts, to those of any rank, character or nation; and in this way he diverted attention from the Prince and sometimes gained admission for the pair into strange societies. . . .

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