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Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law

by Mary Roach

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1,1766917,043 (3.86)77
"Join "America's funniest science writer" (Peter Carlson, Washington Post) Mary Roach on an irresistible investigation into the unpredictable world where wildlife and humans meet. What's to be done about a jaywalking moose? A grizzly bear caught breaking and entering? A murderous tree? As New York Times best-selling author Mary Roach discovers, the answers are best found not in jurisprudence but in science: the curious science of human-wildlife conflict, a discipline at the crossroads of human behavior and wildlife biology. Roach tags along with animal attack forensics investigators, human-elephant conflict specialists, bear managers, and "danger tree" faller-blasters. She travels from leopard-terrorized hamlets in the Indian Himalaya to St. Peter's Square in the early hours before the Pope arrives for Easter Mass, when vandal gulls swoop in to destroy the elaborate floral display. Along the way, Roach reveals as much about humanity as about nature's lawbreakers. Combining little- known forensic science and conservation genetics with a motley cast of laser scarecrows, langur impersonators, and mugging macaques, Fuzz offers hope for compassionate coexistence in our ever-expanding human habitat"--… (more)
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English (66)  French (1)  All languages (67)
Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
Amusing and sad by turns. Accounts of efforts to control human/animal interactions as when bears raid garbage, protect crops and endangered species.
  ritaer | May 22, 2024 |
I've been looking forward to reading Fuzz for long time, but sadly it didn't live up to my high expectations. That's not to say that it was bad, it just wasn't what I was expecting.

This book had a lot of interesting information. I really liked reading about people's interactions with dangerous animals like bears, elephants, and big cats, how experts track animals in the woods to estimate populations, the issues with highways and wildlife, and possible solutions to deal with invasive species.

However, this book was bogged down with long descriptions about things that I'm not as interested in. Like monkey birth control. And half of the book seemed to be devoted to birds screwing with crops, airplanes, spaceships, and parties, and the many ways that people try and fail to deal with them. ( )
  zeronetwo | May 14, 2024 |
3.5 stars

In this book, Mary Roach takes a look at wild animals and their “relationships” with humans, primarily breaking human laws (like attacking them, breaking into houses, stealing, etc.). She talks to and follows along with fish and wildlife officers, and other scientists that study these animals (oh, and trees and plants, too!) and their interactions with humans (and how humans are trying to mitigate these interactions).

I liked this. Despite being about animals, I didn’t like it as much as I like some of her other books, but it was still interesting. I don’t think there was as much humour in this one as some of her others, either, but there were bits of it, too. ( )
  LibraryCin | Mar 11, 2024 |
Always have mixed feelings when I close a Mary Roach book. It's a great joy to read them but then I know it will be a year or two before a new one comes out, so I'm sad. I think Roach chose a really difficult topic this time. It is hard to be funny when you are talking about conservation and the life and death of people and animals. Difficult, but not impossible. Please be sure to read her footnotes as well, a lot of good info and fun gets tucked in there. Especially enjoyed her time at the Vatican.

and, to all those who failed to return her calls and email, you will get called out in this book ( )
  cspiwak | Mar 6, 2024 |
If you have any curiosity for how nature conducts her business, both above board and below. ( )
  ben_r47 | Feb 22, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
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For Gus, Bean, and Winnie. To the farthest star.
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[Introduction:] On June 26, 1659, a representative from five towns in a province of northern Italy initiated legal proceedings against caterpillars.

[Chapter 1:] For most of the past century, your odds of being killed by a cougar were about the same as your odds of being killed by a filing cabinet.
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Whatever you do in this life, stay away from an inebriated bull elephant in musth.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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"Join "America's funniest science writer" (Peter Carlson, Washington Post) Mary Roach on an irresistible investigation into the unpredictable world where wildlife and humans meet. What's to be done about a jaywalking moose? A grizzly bear caught breaking and entering? A murderous tree? As New York Times best-selling author Mary Roach discovers, the answers are best found not in jurisprudence but in science: the curious science of human-wildlife conflict, a discipline at the crossroads of human behavior and wildlife biology. Roach tags along with animal attack forensics investigators, human-elephant conflict specialists, bear managers, and "danger tree" faller-blasters. She travels from leopard-terrorized hamlets in the Indian Himalaya to St. Peter's Square in the early hours before the Pope arrives for Easter Mass, when vandal gulls swoop in to destroy the elaborate floral display. Along the way, Roach reveals as much about humanity as about nature's lawbreakers. Combining little- known forensic science and conservation genetics with a motley cast of laser scarecrows, langur impersonators, and mugging macaques, Fuzz offers hope for compassionate coexistence in our ever-expanding human habitat"--

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