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Everyman's Talmud: The Major Teachings…
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Everyman's Talmud: The Major Teachings of the Rabbinic Sages (original 1932; edition 1995)

by Abraham Cohen (Author)

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719920,872 (3.98)2
"To some readers of this book, the Talmud represents little more than a famous Jewish book. But people want to know about a book that, they are told, defines Judaism. Everyman's Talmud is the right place to begin not only to learn about Judaism in general but to meet the substance of the Talmud in particular . . . In time to come, Cohen's book will find its companion-though I do not anticipate it will ever require a successor for what it accomplishes with elegance and intelligence: a systematic theology of the Talmud's Judaism." --From the Foreword by Jacob Neusner Long regarded as the classic introduction to the teachings of the Talmud, this comprehensive and masterly distillation summarizes the wisdom of the rabbinic sages on the dominant themes of Judaism: the doctrine of God; God and the universe; the soul and its destiny; prophesy and revelation; physical life; moral life and social living; law, ethics, and jurisprudence; legends and folk traditions; the Messiah and the world to come.… (more)
Member:Rourke
Title:Everyman's Talmud: The Major Teachings of the Rabbinic Sages
Authors:Abraham Cohen (Author)
Info:Schocken (1995), Edition: Revised ed., 464 pages
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Everyman's Talmud: The Major Teachings of the Rabbinic Sages by Abraham Cohen (1932)

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Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
This book was written to educate readers about Talmud, The 'Rulings' of the Sages, their explanations of Torah Law(Halacha) --No we do not call ours the old Testamentm but rather the Torah or Tanach(K). This is one of many wonderfully written books meant to educate Jews and non Jews, and to, perhaps shed a bit of light on what Jews believe, if you should happen to have an open mind and a strong background in Torah,. ( )
  AniIma | Sep 22, 2014 |
I took an incredibly long time to read this. I guess I have a hard time maintaining interest in books that offer a distillation of the ethical teachings of religious texts, because those teachings are largely what I would have assumed them to be from the beginning. This is a very detailed and informative work, just not one that I found very engaging to read. It did pick up toward the end with the sections on folklore and magic, jurisprudence, and eschatology, which were the subjects I was most interested in.

Cohen maintains a fine balance between scholarship and apologetics, which also puts me off a little: I don't need to be convinced that rabbinic Judaism is worthy of my respect, and I'm intrigued by many of the talmudic statements that seem to make Cohen uncomfortable. He tries to dampen many extracts that do not seem to mesh with his worldview, but to his credit he does not leave them out.

While I found this book to be a bit dull, it served as an excellent introduction to the subject. I am glad to have tackled it because I now feel ready to move on to more interesting studies on the Talmud and rabbinic Judaism. ( )
  breadhat | Jul 23, 2013 |
A very informative book, from the introduction to the bibliography. Many of the stories from the Talmud shed light, for me, on some of Jesus' parables and on some early Christian traditions. Not to mention improving my understanding of Judaism. ( )
  nmele | Apr 6, 2013 |
NO OF PAGES: 405 SUB CAT I: Talmud SUB CAT II: SUB CAT III: DESCRIPTION: This comprehensive and masterly distillation summarizes the wisdom of the rabbinic sages on the dominant themes of Judaism: the doctrine of God, God and the universe, the soul and its destiny, prophecy and revelation, physical life, the Messiah, etc.NOTES: SUBTITLE: The Major Teachings of the Rabbinic Sages
  BeitHallel | Feb 18, 2011 |
Selections from the Talmud in readable manner
  Folkshul | Jan 15, 2011 |
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Dedication
To the memory
of the late
CHIEF RABBI
Very Rev. Dr. J. H. Hertz
in esteem and gratitude
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INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW AMERICAN EDITION
By Dr. Boaz Cohen
What is this book which has stimulated the mind and the emotions of the Jews, and to a lesser extent has aroused the attention of Christians and Mohammedans throughout the ages?
PREFACE
While there is now no lack of books which regale the English reader with selections from the Talmud, tales from the Talmud, and wise saying of the Rabbis, there is no work which attempts a comprehensive survey of the doctrine of this important branch of Jewish literature.
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