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Made in America by Bill Bryson
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Made in America (edition 1996)

by Bill Bryson

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3,764422,419 (3.82)62
Bryson de-mythologizes his native land, explaining how a dusty desert hamlet with neither woods nor holly became Hollywood, how the Wild West wasn't won, why Americans say 'lootenant' and 'Toosday', how Americans were eating junk food long before the word itself was cooked up - as well as exposing the true origins of the G-string, the original $64,000 question and Dr. Kellogg of cornflakes fame.… (more)
Member:hazm8
Title:Made in America
Authors:Bill Bryson
Info:Harper Perennial (1996), Paperback
Collections:Finished
Rating:
Tags:non-fiction, language

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Made in America: An Informal History of the English Language in the United States by Bill Bryson

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Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
Two books in one, Bill Bryson's “Made in America” (1994) is both a lively history of popular culture in America and an etymology of the words and phrases that grew out of that culture.

Bryson tells us what the Puritans did for fun, how frozen foods were invented (by accident, like so much else), how McDonald's restaurants came to be (Ray Kroc actually had little to do with it), why in wagon trains the wagons actually traveled not in line but side by side and that the first hit movie, although it was not yet called a movie, was “Fred Ott's Sneeze,” showing exactly what the title says.

Shopping carts originated in Oklahoma City back in 1936, Bryson tells us, but the inventor, Sylvan Goldman, had to hire people to demonstrate to customers how to use them.

What does George Washington's home, Mount Vernon, have to do with the word groggy? The plantation was named after the British admiral Edward Vernon, whose nickname was Old Grog. The daily ration of rum Vernon gave his sailors came to be known as grog, and those who drank too much of it were said to be groggy.

Such "classic Italian dishes" as chicken tetrazzini, veal parmigiana, fettuccine Alfredo and even spaghetti and meatballs originated in the United States. So did Russian dressing, French dressing and chop sued.

In the 1990 census 40 percent more Americans claimed to be Indians than 10 years previously. Was Elizabeth Warren one of these?

And so Bryson goes on for 400 pages. The author has a knack for digging up obscure trivia and then presenting it in entertaining prose. Open the book to any paragraph and you are likely to find something interesting that you won't remember ever hearing before — and probably won't remember tomorrow. ( )
  hardlyhardy | Feb 15, 2021 |
An earlier Bryson, this one, while funny and full of lots of factoids, started to wear thin on me as it is working itself through all the facets of US life. I found the first half of the book more informative, though it may have been the concepts Bryson focuses on n the second half that just did not keep my interest.
  WiebkeK | Jan 21, 2021 |
A very good book with lots and lots of trivia.....so much, in fact, that there is no point in trying to remember much of it....just enjoy it! I think it becomes patently clear when reading Bryson’s books that he preferred life elsewhere for any number of reasons, many of which see the light of day in this book. Tis a good companion to Mother Tongue which I read 25 or so years ago. There is a bit more historical narrative in the book than is really necessary, unless done for the American culturally deprived (which would include a majority of U.S. citizens). Finished 23.04.2020 in Malta during the plague. ( )
  untraveller | Apr 22, 2020 |
$9.95
  CapitalCityPCS | Sep 20, 2019 |
You’d think a history of Americanisms would be dry but that’s not the case here. Bryson keeps the tone light and entertaining with loads of anecdotes about the evolution of English in America. It’s the perfect companion to The Prodigal Tongue: The Love-Hate Relationship Between American and British English; they even share this striking quote from the 1815 North American Review,

“How tame will his language sound, who would describe Niagara in language fitted for the falls at London bridge, or attempt the majesty of the Mississippi in that which was made for the Thames?”

I was surprised that this didn’t feel very dated even though it was first published in 1994, and I found the last chapter, which included Bryson’s opinions about the bias-free language movement, to be the most thought provoking part of the book. ( )
  wandaly | Mar 11, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Bryson, Billprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
McCall, BruceIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Roberts, WilliamNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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In the 1940s, a British traveller to Anholt, a small island fifty miles out in the Kattegat straight between Denmark and Sweden, noticed that the island children sang a piece of doggerel that was clearly nonsense to them. (introduction)
The image of the spiritual founding of America that generations of Americans have grown up with was created, oddly enough, by a poet of limited talents (to put it in the most magnanimous possible way) who lived two centuries after the event in a country three thousand miles away.
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As Jefferson put it: "The new circumstances under which we are placed, call for new words, new phrases, and for the transfer of old words to new objects".
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Bryson de-mythologizes his native land, explaining how a dusty desert hamlet with neither woods nor holly became Hollywood, how the Wild West wasn't won, why Americans say 'lootenant' and 'Toosday', how Americans were eating junk food long before the word itself was cooked up - as well as exposing the true origins of the G-string, the original $64,000 question and Dr. Kellogg of cornflakes fame.

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