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Who Gets to Be Smart by Bri Lee
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Who Gets to Be Smart (edition 2021)

by Bri Lee (Author)

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301657,847 (3.9)None
Member:jenmitchell53
Title:Who Gets to Be Smart
Authors:Bri Lee (Author)
Info:Allen & Unwin (2021), 304 pages
Collections:Your library
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Who Gets to Be Smart by Bri Lee

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In Who Gets To Be Smart, Bri Lee explores the relationship between education, privilege, power and knowledge.

“Knowledge is power, and when powerful people are allowed to shape knowledge and restrict access to knowledge, they are able to consolidate and strengthen their hold on that power.”

Lee’s focus is primarily on the gatekeepers of educational access and success in Australia, and their role in determining who gets to be ‘smart’, rather than the contribution of raw intelligence to the equation. The majority of Lee’s observations about the ways in which knowledge is controlled by those with privilege and power seem obvious to me so I don’t feel the book offered me much personally in the way of unique insight, though I’m sure there are some who have never considered the correlation.

It seemed to me that Lee occasionally followed paths that didn’t really connect to the central premise. There were relevant topics I felt Lee didn’t acknowledge such as Australia’s secondary and tertiary scholarship options, and I think the HECS-HELP and VET schemes merited more discussion.

Lee’s own anecdotes and asides keeps Who Gets To Be Smart from being dry. Her research seems sound, and the information is presented in an accessible manner.

I found Who Gets To Be Smart to be an interesting read, I hope it sparks discussion about inequality in educational access and success that will lead to change. ( )
  shelleyraec | Jun 23, 2021 |
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