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Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk,…
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Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared… (2007)

by Robert Kurson

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What an adventure! This man did so much as a blind man. When he regains his sight, his discoveries of how the brain works are amazing. ( )
  njcur | Feb 13, 2014 |
I found Robert Kurson's: Crashing Through fascinating. Follows in some detail Kurson's life—focusing on his blinding as a child and the restoration of his sight as an adult. Good for anyone interested in how our brains interpret what we see and how we understand our world. Recommended by Margot Casstevens
  SFCC | Jun 4, 2013 |
A cool story, but his writing style sounded like he was talking to kids. I can't put my finger on why, exactly.
The man in the book has been blind since the age of 3 and then gets his sight restored and has to try to understand what his eyes are seeing. Very cool from a neurological point of view, although the guy himself seems like he would be exhausting to be around for long, always charging around all "I will be the best I can be! And experience everything! Rar!"
Kurson's Shadow Divers was also exciting (more so, in fact)--he does have a knack for finding interesting people to write about, but don't read him for the actual writing. ( )
  JenneB | Apr 2, 2013 |
A very interesting story of a very interesting man. The blending of narrative, biography and medical information was done very well. Satisfied the desire to know as much as possible about the man and the medicine. Sometimes it was difficult to believe all the "crashing through" stories, but I guess there really are some folks who live life in the extreme from childhood on. Good read! ( )
  hemlokgang | Nov 15, 2012 |
As I walked down the hall the other day at work, I abruptly decided to see if I could make it back to my office with my eyes closed – to walk as if I was blind. I would call upon my other senses; touch and hearing in particular, to help me maneuver down the hall without hitting something. Luckily no one was in the hall, as it was quite embarrassing when I promptly ran into the wall. Walking blind was not as easy as I thought it would be. I could not tell where sounds were coming from. Touching the wall worked great – until I ran out of wall. And my brain fought with me, the fear of walking into doors, people or walls made it hard work to keep my eyes shut.

Why did I decide to try this strange experiment? I recently read Robert Kurson’s latest book Crashing Through: A True Story of Risk, Adventure, and the Man Who Dared to See. I previously read Kurson’s excellent book Shadow Divers and knew as soon as he had a new book out that I would have to read it. I expected a lot, as Shadow Divers remains one of my favorite non-fiction reads and was a thrilling ride of a book – and I was not disappointed.

Crashing Through tells the story of Mike May; downhill skier, former CIA agent, entrepreneur, inventor, family man, and blind, since the age of three. Blessed with a mother who would not take no for an answer, May was never allowed to let his blindness be a handicap. He never let it slow him down and never let it hold him back – he rides motorcycles, drives cars, and travels by himself. He even holds records in downhill skiing. So, when he discovered there was a revolutionary new way for select blind people to regain their sight, and that he was an excellent candidate for the surgery, he did not let any of his misgivings – and there were many – to hold him back.

Robert Kurson has written a moving and inspirational story about one man’s extraordinary determination to be true to himself. This remarkable journey filled with suspense, romance, and courage, plus insight into the human brain, is a must read for any who have struggled with the desire to make something more of themselves. ( )
  capriciousreader | Jan 23, 2011 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812973682, Paperback)

Mike May spent his life crashing through. Blinded at age three, he defied expectations by breaking world records in downhill speed skiing, joining the CIA, and becoming a successful inventor, entrepreneur, and family man. He had never yearned for vision. Then, in 1999, a chance encounter brought startling news: a revolutionary stem cell transplant surgery could restore May’s vision. It would allow him to drive, to read, to see his children’s faces. But the procedure was filled with gambles, some of them deadly, others beyond May’s wildest dreams. Beautifully written and thrillingly told, Crashing Through is a journey of suspense, daring, romance, and insight into the mysteries of vision and the brain. Robert Kurson gives us a fascinating account of one man’s choice to explore what it means to see–and to truly live.

Praise for the National Bestseller Crashing Through:

“An incredible human story [told] in gripping fashion . . . a great read.”
–Chicago Sun-Times

“Inspiring.”
–USA Today

“[An] astonishing story . . . memorably told . . . May is remarkable. . . . Don’t be surprised if your own vision mists over now and then.”
–Chicago Tribune

“[A] moving account [of] an extraordinary character.”
–People

“Terrific . . . [a] genuinely fascinating account of the nature of human vision.”
–The Washington Post

“Kurson is a man with natural curiosity and one who can feel the excitement life has to offer. One of his great gifts is he makes you feel it, too.”
–The Kansas City Star

“Propulsive . . . a gripping adventure story.”
–Entertainment Weekly

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:59 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

"Mike May spent his life crashing through. Blinded at age three, he defied expectations by breaking world records in downhill speed skiing, joining the CIA, and becoming a successful inventor, entrepreneur, and family man. He had never yearned for vision." "Then, in 1999, a chance encounter brought startling news: a revolutionary stem cell transplant surgery could restore May's vision. It would allow him to drive, to read, to see his children's faces. He began to contemplate an astonishing new world: Would music still sound the same? Would sex be different? Would he recognize himself in the mirror? Would his marriage survive? Would he still be Mike May?""The procedure was filled with risks, some of them deadly, others beyond May's wildest dreams. And even if the surgery worked, history was against him. Fewer than twenty cases were known worldwide in which a person gained vision after a lifetime of blindness. Each of those people suffered desperate consequences we can scarcely imagine." "There were countless reasons for May to refuse vision. He could think of only a single reason to go forward. Whatever his decision, he knew it would change his life." "Robert Kurson gives us an account of one man's choice to explore what it means to see - and to truly live."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

» see all 4 descriptions

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