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My City Speaks by Darren Lebeuf
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My City Speaks (edition 2021)

by Darren Lebeuf (Author)

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374593,264 (4)None
A young girl, who is visually impaired, finds much to celebrate as she explores the city she loves.A young girl and her father spend a day in the city, her city, traveling to the places they go together: the playground, the community garden, the market, an outdoor concert. As they do, the girl describes what she senses in delightfully precise, poetic detail. Her city, she says, "rushes and stops, and waits and goes." It "pitters and patters, and drips and drains." It "echoes" and "trills," and is both "smelly" and "sweet." Her city also speaks, as it "dings and dongs, and rattles and roars." And sometimes, maybe even some of the best times, it just listens.Darren Lebeuf uses his keen observational skills as an award-winning photographer to poetically capture sensory experiences in this charming ode to city life. The rhythmic, lyrical text makes for an appealing read-aloud. Ashley Barron's vividly hued cut-paper collage illustrations add compelling visual interest to the text's descriptions. Though the main character is visually impaired, she travels around the city and enthusiastically enjoys its many offerings, and actively contributes to the lyrical bustle of city life by putting on a violin performance in the park. The author's use of limited but evocative language can help children develop an aesthetic awareness and can serve as a perfect jumping-off point for children to use their senses to specifically describe, and appreciate, their own surroundings. The story and illustrations were reviewed by a blind sensitivity reader.… (more)
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Showing 4 of 4
Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.
  fernandie | Sep 15, 2022 |
The narrator is a little girl with a visual impairment that uses a cane to navigate around her city. She describes what she hears, and how she walks around dangers using her cane. This story is best for younger children, perhaps around four to six years old due to its simple sentences and descriptive pictures. ( )
  SarahFromAmerica | Mar 8, 2022 |
Winner of 2022 Schneider Picture Book Award ( )
  melodyreads | Jan 26, 2022 |
Readers follow a blind girl through her city. The author personifies the city by having it grow and speak and do other human things. The words the author uses emphasize hearing, feeling, smelling and tasting--drips, sweet, roar, and smelly. The last sound of the city in the book is the main character playing her violin. I like the cut-paper illustrations. It would be so fantastic if the book could be printed in a way that blind children could feel the layers of the cut paper. ( )
  AmandaSanders | Oct 2, 2021 |
Showing 4 of 4
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A young girl, who is visually impaired, finds much to celebrate as she explores the city she loves.A young girl and her father spend a day in the city, her city, traveling to the places they go together: the playground, the community garden, the market, an outdoor concert. As they do, the girl describes what she senses in delightfully precise, poetic detail. Her city, she says, "rushes and stops, and waits and goes." It "pitters and patters, and drips and drains." It "echoes" and "trills," and is both "smelly" and "sweet." Her city also speaks, as it "dings and dongs, and rattles and roars." And sometimes, maybe even some of the best times, it just listens.Darren Lebeuf uses his keen observational skills as an award-winning photographer to poetically capture sensory experiences in this charming ode to city life. The rhythmic, lyrical text makes for an appealing read-aloud. Ashley Barron's vividly hued cut-paper collage illustrations add compelling visual interest to the text's descriptions. Though the main character is visually impaired, she travels around the city and enthusiastically enjoys its many offerings, and actively contributes to the lyrical bustle of city life by putting on a violin performance in the park. The author's use of limited but evocative language can help children develop an aesthetic awareness and can serve as a perfect jumping-off point for children to use their senses to specifically describe, and appreciate, their own surroundings. The story and illustrations were reviewed by a blind sensitivity reader.

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