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La importancia de llamarse Ernesto (Letras…
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La importancia de llamarse Ernesto (Letras mayusculas) (original 1895; edition 2007)

by Oscar Wilde

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
10,174170597 (4.16)2 / 366
Wilde's most popular play is considered his wittiest and finest comedy. The play's subtitle, "A Trivial Comedy for Serious People" hints at its clever wordplay, ingenious epigrams, and sly British humor. It is a story of multiple mistaken identities--both deliberate and unintentional- and what ultimately becomes a hilarious exercise in keeping everyone's name and pseudonym straight. First performed in 1895, it has enduring appeal as dramatic literature and in live theatrical performance. This edition includes an appendix with Wilde's earlier versions of the play and deleted scenes that illustrate Wilde's creative process.… (more)
Member:Ophiacus
Title:La importancia de llamarse Ernesto (Letras mayusculas)
Authors:Oscar Wilde
Info:Edimat Libros (2007), Hardcover, 128 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde (1895)

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» See also 366 mentions

English (155)  Catalan (2)  Italian (2)  Spanish (2)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  Portuguese (1)  French (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (167)
Showing 1-5 of 155 (next | show all)
8495959038
  archivomorero | Nov 9, 2022 |
After reading Lady Windermere's Fan I decided to move on to this, and I certainly enjoyed it just as much. Very amusing and an excellent short read. ( )
  Detective-Stories | Nov 6, 2022 |
Very Quotable witty farce.

"Jack. [Pulling off his gloves.] When one is in town one amuses oneself. When one is in the country one amuses other people.
Algernon. Got nice neighbours in your part of Shropshire?
Jack. Perfectly horrid! Never speak to one of them."

"Algernon. The amount of women in London who flirt with their own husbands is perfectly scandalous. It looks so bad. It is simply washing one’s clean linen in public."

"Lady Bracknell. I’m sorry if we are a little late, Algernon, but I was obliged to call on dear Lady Harbury. I hadn’t been there since her poor husband’s death. I never saw a woman so altered; she looks quite twenty years younger."

"lady bracknell. Nor do I in any way approve of the modern sympathy with invalids. I consider it morbid. Illness of any kind is hardly a thing to be encouraged in others. Health is the primary duty of life."

"Lady Bracknell. I have always been of opinion that a man who desires to get married should know either everything or nothing. Which do you know?
Jack. [After some hesitation.] I know nothing, Lady Bracknell.
Lady Bracknell. I am pleased to hear it."

" Lady Bracknell. To lose one parent, Mr. Worthing, may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness."

" Algernon. My dear boy, I love hearing my relations abused. It is the only thing that makes me put up with them at all."

" Algernon. What shall we do after dinner? Go to a theatre?
Jack. Oh no! I loathe listening.
Algernon. Well, let us go to the Club? Jack. Oh, no! I hate talking.
Algernon. Well, we might trot round to the Empire at ten?
Jack. Oh, no! I can’t bear looking at things. It is so silly.
Algernon. Well, what shall we do?
Jack. Nothing!"

" Cecily. Well, I know, of course, how important it is not to keep a business engagement, if one wants to retain any sense of the beauty of life,"

" Cecily. You dear romantic boy. [He kisses her, she puts her fingers through his hair.] I hope your hair curls naturally, does it?
Algernon. Yes, darling, with a little help from others."

" Gwendolyn. I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train."

" lady bracknell. I do not approve of mercenary marriages. When I married Lord Bracknell I had no fortune of any kind. But I never dreamed for a moment of allowing that to stand in my way." ( )
  debbie13410 | Oct 22, 2022 |
Chirp Audiobook

I loved this book as much as I loved it in college. Although the banter gets to be a little much towards the end, it left me wanting more. More Earnest, more Algernon. ( )
  whatalicesaw | Apr 26, 2022 |
To be honest I have no idea whan I read this the first time but it is one of my favorite plays and I have read it numerous times. Maybe it is time to read it again. ( )
  KyleneJones | Apr 25, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 155 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (114 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Wilde, Oscarprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Agate, JamesContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Beerbohm, MaxContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hankin, St. JohnContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Holland, VyvyanForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lee, AlanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Popkin, HenryEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shaw, George BernardContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tsao, AlexCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Morning-room in Algernon's flat in Half-Moon Street. The room is luxuriously and artistically furnished.
Did you hear what I was playing, Lane?
Quotations
LADY BRACKNELL: To lose one parent, Mr. Worthing, may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness.
ALGERNON: Did you hear what I was playing, Lane?
LANE: I didn't think it polite to listen, sir.
ALGERNON: I am sorry for that, for your sake. I don't play accurately—anyone can play accurately—but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life.
ALGERNON: Good heavens! Is marriage so demoralising as that?
LANE: I believe it is a very pleasant state, sir. I have had very little experience of it myself up to the present. I have only been married once. That was in consequence of a misunderstanding between myself and a young person.
ALGERNON: Oh! it is absurd to have a hard-and-fast rule about what one should read and what one shouldn't. More than half of modern culture depends on what one shouldn't read.
JACK: I am quite aware of the fact, and I don't propose to discuss modern culture. It isn't the sort of thing one should talk of in private.
ALGERNON: The truth is rarely pure and never simple. Modern life would be very tedious if it were either, and modern literature a complete impossibility!
JACK: That wouldn't be at all a bad thing.
ALGERNON: Literary criticism is not your forte, my dear fellow. Don't try it. You should leave that to people who haven't been at a University. They do it so well in the daily papers.
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Please do not combine with works that contain any work other than The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
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Wilde's most popular play is considered his wittiest and finest comedy. The play's subtitle, "A Trivial Comedy for Serious People" hints at its clever wordplay, ingenious epigrams, and sly British humor. It is a story of multiple mistaken identities--both deliberate and unintentional- and what ultimately becomes a hilarious exercise in keeping everyone's name and pseudonym straight. First performed in 1895, it has enduring appeal as dramatic literature and in live theatrical performance. This edition includes an appendix with Wilde's earlier versions of the play and deleted scenes that illustrate Wilde's creative process.

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HighBridge

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge.

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