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Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow: A…
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Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow: A novel (edition 2022)

by Gabrielle Zevin (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,8732082,313 (4.1)156
In this exhilarating novel by the best-selling author of The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry two friends--often in love, but never lovers--come together as creative partners in the world of video game design, where success brings them fame, joy, tragedy, duplicity, and, ultimately, a kind of immortality. On a bitter-cold day, in the December of his junior year at Harvard, Sam Masur exits a subway car and sees, amid the hordes of people waiting on the platform, Sadie Green. He calls her name. For a moment, she pretends she hasn't heard him, but then, she turns, and a game begins: a legendary collaboration that will launch them to stardom. They borrow money, beg favors, and, before even graduating college, they have created their first blockbuster, Ichigo: a game where players can escape the confines of a body and the betrayals of a heart, and where death means nothing more than a chance to restart and play again. This is the story of the perfect worlds Sam and Sadie build, the imperfect world they live in, and of everything that comes after success: Money. Fame. Duplicity. Tragedy.   Spanning thirty years, from Cambridge, Massachusetts, to Venice Beach, California, and lands in between and far beyond, Gabrielle Zevin's Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow is a dazzling and intricately imagined novel that examines the multifarious nature of identity, games as artform, technology and the human experience, disability, failure, the redemptive possibilities in play, and above all, our need to connect: to be loved and to love. Yes, it is a love story, but it is not one you have read before. Cover image: The Great Wave (detail) by Katsushika Hokusai. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.… (more)
Member:stefmorgan
Title:Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow: A novel
Authors:Gabrielle Zevin (Author)
Info:Knopf (2022), 416 pages
Collections:Your library, To read
Rating:
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Work Information

Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow by Gabrielle Zevin

  1. 00
    The Unseen World by Liz Moore (pbirch01)
    pbirch01: Both involve computer programming, are set in both Boston and California, and include ruminations on the intersection between humans and technology
  2. 00
    Version Control by Dexter Palmer (pbirch01)
    pbirch01: Both use the idea of a conversation with someone who is not there as an equivalent to AI
  3. 00
    Goodbye for Now by Laurie Frankel (baystateRA)
    baystateRA: Algorithms and romantic attraction. Young computer start-up partners and how they can and can’t love each other. Bittersweet and beautifully written like Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow.
  4. 00
    The Startup Wife by Tahmima Anam (Othemts)
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» See also 156 mentions

English (203)  Catalan (3)  Dutch (1)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (208)
Showing 1-5 of 203 (next | show all)
Loved it ( )
  chasidar | Jun 12, 2024 |
I've never really gotten into video games, like many of my peers. This is mostly because my highly academic & educated parents did not allow video games at home. The games I did get to play were far and few in-between. One of the games I did have access to, however, was the Oregon Trail, which features pretty prominently in the first 3rd of the book and is referenced throughout the rest of the book. So in that respect, I am this book's *sorta* target audience in that I played that game (a later version though) and I am an *elder* millennial. That's not why I loved the novel though.

While this book's main characters and the main plot focus on the creation of video games, there are far deeper, more complex, issues that lie at the heart of this story. The author uses the video and the metaphor of the video game to examine and challenge human's perceptions of love, friendship, work, family, sense of belonging; as well as life, death and grief. I think this quote, from the last 3rd of the book (336), encapsulates why I loved this book and why it resonated with me.

"What is a game?" Marx said. "It's tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow. It's the possibility of infinite rebirth, infinite redemption. The idea that if you keep playing, you could win. No loss is permanent, because nothing is permanent, ever." ( )
  jenkies720 | Jun 7, 2024 |
I’m not a gamer but I really enjoyed Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow nevertheless. It opened my eyes to the world of gaming and I started to see games as an art form, a world a gamer can escape to, as creative, as intricately constructed and as immersive as a book is to a reader.
Gaming is everything to Sadie and Sam. They meet and connect over a Nintendo consul, reconnect and develop their first game together after bumping into each other in Cambridge and go on to become partners in a successful gaming company. Their special friendship is incredibly moving from beginning to end. The heartbreaking acts of support, love and kindness are as impactful as the misunderstandings, jealousies and rivalries. The recurring themes of Macbeth’s Tomorrow soliloquy, Emily Dickenson’s Freight fitting the Groove and The Illiad’s Tamer of Horses add emotional depth and poignancy. When life sucks – death, tragedy, depression, disability, discrimination – press reset and start again. A glass heart might shatter, a maze might not lead you home but there is always tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow.
“Maybe it was the willingness to play that hinted at a tender, eternally newborn part in all humans. Maybe it was the willingness to play that kept one from despair.” ( )
  geraldine_croft | Jun 2, 2024 |
I thought the relationships in this were a touch toxic and that there were some really big things just thrown in for shock factor ( )
  spiritedstardust | Jun 1, 2024 |
Overall, a really great book, although I did feel like some parts got in the weeds about the inner workings of how a video game is made. I really enjoyed the focus on friendship and chosen family. I think the author also skillfully described how small misunderstandings and grievances can destroy a relationship if folks aren’t willing to have those difficult and authentic conversations. ( )
  HRHSophie | May 30, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 203 (next | show all)
To me, Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow is not about video games or work. It is about stories.

What Sadie and Sam do in the novel – through the guise of video game design – is create stories with and for each other. Unable to replay their past, as both the main characters grow older they re-interpret their shared history to play out their future with each other. Unwilling (or unable) to allow Sadie to leave his life, Sam uses the work of game design to try to keep her creating shared stories with him.

A relationship is just another form of world-building.
 
Her story begins around the turn of the century, when two college students, Samson Mazer (mathematics at Harvard) and Sadie Green (computer science at MIT), bump into each other at a train station. The pair haven’t spoken since childhood, when they met in the games room of a hospital
added by rakerman | editThe Guardian, Pippa Bailey (Jul 18, 2022)
 
Gabrielle Zevin is (...) a Literary Gamer — in fact, she describes her devotion to the medium as “lifelong” — and in her delightful and absorbing new novel, “Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow,” Richard Powers’s “Galatea 2.2” and the stealth-action video game “Metal Gear Solid” stand uncontroversially side by side in the minds of her characters as foundational source texts.

...

whimsicruelty — a smiling, bright-eyed march into pitch-black narrative material
added by rakerman | editNew York Times, Tom Bissel (pay site) (Jul 8, 2022)
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gabrielle Zevinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Cihi, JulianNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kim, JenniferNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
That Love is all there is,
Is all we know of Love;
It is enough, the freight should be
Proportioned to the groove.
--Emily Dickinson
Dedication
Again, for H.C.--in work and in play
First words
Before Mazer invented himself as Mazer, he was Samson Mazer, and before he was Samson Mazer, he was Samson Masur--a change of two letters that transformed him from a nice, ostensibly Jewish boy to a Professional Builder of Worlds--and for most of his youth, he was Sam, S.A.M. on the hall of fame on his grandfather's Donkey Kong machine, but mainly Sam.
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In this exhilarating novel by the best-selling author of The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry two friends--often in love, but never lovers--come together as creative partners in the world of video game design, where success brings them fame, joy, tragedy, duplicity, and, ultimately, a kind of immortality. On a bitter-cold day, in the December of his junior year at Harvard, Sam Masur exits a subway car and sees, amid the hordes of people waiting on the platform, Sadie Green. He calls her name. For a moment, she pretends she hasn't heard him, but then, she turns, and a game begins: a legendary collaboration that will launch them to stardom. They borrow money, beg favors, and, before even graduating college, they have created their first blockbuster, Ichigo: a game where players can escape the confines of a body and the betrayals of a heart, and where death means nothing more than a chance to restart and play again. This is the story of the perfect worlds Sam and Sadie build, the imperfect world they live in, and of everything that comes after success: Money. Fame. Duplicity. Tragedy.   Spanning thirty years, from Cambridge, Massachusetts, to Venice Beach, California, and lands in between and far beyond, Gabrielle Zevin's Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow is a dazzling and intricately imagined novel that examines the multifarious nature of identity, games as artform, technology and the human experience, disability, failure, the redemptive possibilities in play, and above all, our need to connect: to be loved and to love. Yes, it is a love story, but it is not one you have read before. Cover image: The Great Wave (detail) by Katsushika Hokusai. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

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