HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Atlas Paradox (Atlas Series, 2) by…
Loading...

The Atlas Paradox (Atlas Series, 2) (edition 2022)

by Olivie Blake (Author)

Series: Atlas Series (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9061323,097 (3.55)4
Fantasy. Fiction. HTML:

The Atlas Paradox is the long-awaited sequel to Olivie Blake's New York Times bestselling dark academic sensation The Atlas Six??guaranteed to have even more yearning, backstabbing, betrayal, and chaos.
Six magicians were presented with the opportunity of a lifetime.
Five are now members of the Society.
Two paths lay before them.
All must pick a side.
Alliances will be tested, hearts will be broken, and The Society of Alexandrians will be revealed for what it is: a secret society with raw, world-changing power, headed by a man whose plans to change life as we know it are already under way.
"The Atlas Six introduced six of the most devious, talented, and flawed characters to ever find themselves in a magical library, and then sets them against one another in a series of stunning betrayals and reversals. As much a delicious contest of wit, will, and passion as it is of magic...half mystery, half puzzle, and wholly a delight."??New York Times bestselling author Holly Black
A Macmillan Audio production from Tor Books.… (more)

Member:elhtfiction
Title:The Atlas Paradox (Atlas Series, 2)
Authors:Olivie Blake (Author)
Info:Tor Books (2022), 416 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

The Atlas Paradox by Olivie Blake

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
Unfortunately, I liked this book less than the first one, but it still wasn't terrible. I felt this book suffered a bit from middle book syndrome; it took too long for anything to happen really. The most interesting part for most of the book was Libby's chapters which weren't that frequent. I'd still say that the conflict in the books is a bit confusing; I'm intrigued to see how this series will wrap up in the final installment. Overall, I just wished more had happened in this book, but I suppose Blake is just setting up the conclusion. ( )
  TimeLord10SPW | Sep 29, 2023 |
Thank you to NetGalley and Tor Books for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.

I liked The Atlas Six a bit more than this one but still a really solid middle book of a trilogy. I also had a lot going on in my life to distract me a bit from this. Paradox had less of a solid goal/climax it was working towards than Six which can be a struggle for me. This was a lot of character development and/or growth and setting things up for the next book I think. I just absolutely love Blake's writing though and need to read everything she has done. Looking forward to The Atlas Complex! ( )
  Fatula | Sep 25, 2023 |
I did NOT expect myself EVER liking Callum's character. Lol..it felt new. I can't wait to see what happens next with some of the unexpected alliances now made ( )
  NG_YbL | Jul 12, 2023 |
*2.5 stars*

I’m mostly confused but this was definitely better than the first book in the series.

So I actually hated the Atlas Six so what did I do? I bought the second one, naturally. This one surprisingly was a bit better. The characters interacted with each other a bit more though still not enough for my liking. I liked Libby’s journey and Gideons POV too. Honestly I think this book would be so much better if just Libby and snick were the main characters. I couldn’t care less about the other characters tbh.

Unfortunately this book still remains extremely abstract. The main conflict seems to be Atlas wanting to create a new world, which like, what does that even mean??? Why would he want to do that? What is supposedly this master plan that everyone needs to participate in but never seems to get even close to being played out? And because of this possible threat tons of people are killed (or attempted to be killed) or even trapped in the past?? I don’t really get it.

With this book I can’t really tell who’s the villain and who the heroes are and all the characters besides Gideon and Nico confuse me. They don’t seem like they would have been willing to kill for a library. Idk. This just is not as good of a book as it’s hyped up to be. I’ll still prob read the third one though. ( )
  willowzz | Jun 27, 2023 |
Originally posted on Just Geeking by.

Content warnings:
There are scenes of emotional manipulation, trauma, violence and death throughout. Various ongoing theoretical and philosophical discussions push at boundaries regarding time, morality and cause and effect which may be uncomfortable for some readers. There are scenes discussing child abuse and an on page emotionally abusive relationship, the latter of which includes scenes involving a kidnapping, stalking and feelings of being followed. There are scenes that include misogyny and racism, and there are references to off page suicide and deaths due to terminal illness.

Earlier this year, I was pleasantly surprised to find that The Atlas Six was worth all the hype and like many was left desperately needing to know what happens next! At the end of The Atlas Six the six candidates had been reduced to five, as required by the agreement they signed to enter the library. It just had not gone as they planned. Instead of killing Callum, as they had all agreed to do, Libby had been kidnapped by Ezra, her ex-boyfriend, and a magical construct of her corpse and a murder scene left behind. The huge flaw in his plan was that he did not account for Tristan’s ability to see the world differently, to be able to see through illusions and tell an animated construct from reality. He immediately knew that Libby’s “body” was false, and that was about where book one ended.

The Atlas Paradox once again showcases Blake’s talent for deception as the five remaining initiates return to the library for the second and final year, sans Libby. With Libby missing and Callum still alive, the dynamics of the five have been shaken up and if there’s one thing that Blake proved to be her forte in book one it’s interpersonal relationships. Any ideas you had about what might happen in this sequel you may as well toss out of the window, because everything changes in the first few chapters of The Atlas Paradox with an initiation ritual.

From there on new partnerships are made as new things come to light about The Society, the library and of course, Atlas Blakely. Once again it was interesting to see the interesting ways that Blake’s mind works, and how she mixes magic with scientific and philosophical theory. She takes things even further this time, pushing at the boundaries of what we know or at least what we think we know. This is one book that will make you question a lot of things, and not just the characters motives.

You may be wondering why I’ve given this book a three-star rating if it’s so good. The problem is that the first book blew everything else out of the water. It showed exactly how good Blake’s writing could be, and personally, this one fell short for me. In comparison, The Atlas Paradox has many of the same ingredients that The Atlas Six did, it’s just a very different book. While I can acknowledge and admire Blake’s beautiful writing, it personally didn’t tick all the boxes for me like the previous book. I felt that this one was a bit too much theory based for me liking, too much talking and not nearly enough action. However, Blake still kept me on the edge of my seat. I was still thoroughly engrossed in every moment, in every twist and turn and just like the first book she wove each plot to a point that leads to something huge which makes you need to read the next book.

I admit that I probably would have found this book easier to read if I was reading an e-book rather than a paperback as the font was ridiculously tiny (I’m not sure if that was just the case of my ARC or the final copy), but if I had read an e-book I would have missed out on the glorious art work by Clara aka Little Chmura. So it’s a toss up depending on your accessibility needs and your preferences. I muddled through, but be warned there is a lot more theory and philosophical discussion in this book than there was in The Atlas Six. It can get quite head spinning at times, and unlike the first book there are fewer breaks between these discussions.

One thing I was quite disappointed with was the name-drops of chronic pain and depression without any actual representation to back them up. Both in The Atlas Paradox and The Atlas Six Blake has done a good job of representing trauma, and in The Atlas Six there was great anxiety representation too. So a lot of the disappointment comes from knowing that she isn’t an author that skims on representation, but rather missed the boat on these two. With regard to chronic pain, she goes into a lot of detail about how there needs to be a scientific balance to that individual’s use of their abilities, and then fails to show hardly any chronic pain representation throughout the novel. The character in question does show some physical symptoms, however, they are the same symptoms shown by other characters and described in much the same way. There’s a reason for this which is a huge spoiler, so I can’t go into more detail, but my point is there should have been more deliberate representation of chronic pain and the lack of it is noticeable.

BLOG | REVIEWS | REVIEW SCHEDULE | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM | PINTEREST |
( )
  justgeekingby | Jun 6, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
For my talisman,

Henry Atlas
First words
Gideon Drake shaded his eyes from the red-burning sun and swept a glance across the scorched and blackened hills.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Fantasy. Fiction. HTML:

The Atlas Paradox is the long-awaited sequel to Olivie Blake's New York Times bestselling dark academic sensation The Atlas Six??guaranteed to have even more yearning, backstabbing, betrayal, and chaos.
Six magicians were presented with the opportunity of a lifetime.
Five are now members of the Society.
Two paths lay before them.
All must pick a side.
Alliances will be tested, hearts will be broken, and The Society of Alexandrians will be revealed for what it is: a secret society with raw, world-changing power, headed by a man whose plans to change life as we know it are already under way.
"The Atlas Six introduced six of the most devious, talented, and flawed characters to ever find themselves in a magical library, and then sets them against one another in a series of stunning betrayals and reversals. As much a delicious contest of wit, will, and passion as it is of magic...half mystery, half puzzle, and wholly a delight."??New York Times bestselling author Holly Black
A Macmillan Audio production from Tor Books.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.55)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 6
2.5 1
3 19
3.5 9
4 24
4.5 3
5 7

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 201,802,700 books! | Top bar: Always visible