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Becoming Kin: An Indigenous Call to Unforgetting the Past and Reimagining Our Future

by Patty Krawec

Other authors: Nick Estes (Foreword)

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12011224,809 (4.74)3
"The invented history of the Western world is crumbling fast, Anishinaabe writer Patty Krawec says, but we can still honor the bonds between us. Settlers dominated and divided, but Indigenous peoples won't just send them all 'home.' Weaving her own story with the story of her ancestors and with the broader themes of creation, replacement, and disappearance, Krawec helps readers see settler colonialism through the eyes of an Indigenous writer. Settler colonialism tried to force us into one particular way of living, but the old ways of kinship can help us imagine a different future. Krawec asks, What would it look like to remember that we are all related? How might we become better relatives to the land, to one another, and to Indigenous movements for solidarity? Braiding together historical, scientific, and cultural analysis, Indigenous ways of knowing, and the vivid threads of communal memory, Krawec crafts a stunning, forceful call to 'unforget' our history. This remarkable sojourn through Native and settler history, myth, identity, and spirituality helps us retrace our steps and pick up what was lost along the way: chances to honor rather than violate treaties, to see the land as a relative rather than a reso urce, and to unravel the history we have been taught"--Book jacket flap.… (more)
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» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
This is a very powerful book, and I greatly appreciated the way Krawec combined some of the darker history of the Americas with more inspiring stories and action items, instead of just focusing on the evil that was done. While we can't ignore the horrible things that happened, dwelling on them without breaks to look at what we can do now won't help us move forward. This is a very well thought-out book, and should be part of everyone's library so that we can start to heal this land together.

Side note: I loved hearing this as an audiobook. Having the Native stories told to me in this way felt more real and appropriate. I also appreciated hearing the Native words spoken. But I've also now ordered the hardback copy of the book, because the action items and resources are something I need to see in print in order to properly work with them. ( )
  ca.bookwyrm | Dec 13, 2023 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
A compassionate and accessible primer for beginning to do the work of decolonization. If you are a white settler on Turtle Island, this book is for you. Krawec guides us through learning — unforgetting — the real histories of this land and it’s people, and shares stories from her own life, her Anishinaabe people, and others. Each chapter ends with an action that settlers can take and the chapters build on each other so that by the end of the book a reader will have done quite a bit. For the reader for whom this book’s subject is not new, there is still plenty to learn, as Krawec guides a shift in settler colonial modes of thinking and names concepts that are sometimes hard to pin down. Thank you, Patty Krawec, for this book! ( )
  rowmyboat | Oct 30, 2023 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Patty Krawec invites the reader to explore the history of settler colonialism and how it impacted both the indigenous peoples of North America and those who settled here. She contends that indigenous traditions and ways of viewing the world offer a new way forward for the continent and the world.
  zhejw | Mar 2, 2023 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This is a challenging book. Not because of the readability, but because it challenges the reader to take a hard look at the history most of us have come to accept as truth in the United States and see the centuries of damage it has wrought. There is hard love in this book, and love in abundance. The invitation is to love back, to acknowledge the systems still in power that continue to divide us as harmful and to change our minds and actions to dismantle them so that we all become kin. ( )
  amaryann21 | Nov 15, 2022 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Becoming Kin is a must-read book for social justice. Well organized and including questions and actions to consider, Krawec’s look at the violent displacement of Native peoples is a book I will certainly re-read and recommend. ( )
  Well-ReadNeck | Nov 5, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
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Patty Krawecprimary authorall editionscalculated
Estes, NickForewordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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"The invented history of the Western world is crumbling fast, Anishinaabe writer Patty Krawec says, but we can still honor the bonds between us. Settlers dominated and divided, but Indigenous peoples won't just send them all 'home.' Weaving her own story with the story of her ancestors and with the broader themes of creation, replacement, and disappearance, Krawec helps readers see settler colonialism through the eyes of an Indigenous writer. Settler colonialism tried to force us into one particular way of living, but the old ways of kinship can help us imagine a different future. Krawec asks, What would it look like to remember that we are all related? How might we become better relatives to the land, to one another, and to Indigenous movements for solidarity? Braiding together historical, scientific, and cultural analysis, Indigenous ways of knowing, and the vivid threads of communal memory, Krawec crafts a stunning, forceful call to 'unforget' our history. This remarkable sojourn through Native and settler history, myth, identity, and spirituality helps us retrace our steps and pick up what was lost along the way: chances to honor rather than violate treaties, to see the land as a relative rather than a reso urce, and to unravel the history we have been taught"--Book jacket flap.

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