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The Mystery of the Aleph by Amir D. Aczel
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The Mystery of the Aleph (edition 2005)

by Amir D. Aczel (Author)

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4831540,200 (3.39)9
From the end of the 19th century until his death, one of history's most brilliant mathematicians languished in an asylum. The Mystery of the Aleph tells the story of Georg Cantor (1845-1918), a Russian-born German who created set theory, the concept of infinite numbers, and the "continuum hypothesis," which challenged the very foundations of mathematics. His ideas brought expected denunciation from established corners - he was called a "corruptor of youth" not only for his work in mathematics, but for his larger attempts to meld spirituality and science.… (more)
Member:Andrew_Molboski
Title:The Mystery of the Aleph
Authors:Amir D. Aczel (Author)
Info:Barnes & Noble (2005), Edition: reprint, 258 pages
Collections:Your library
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Work Information

The Mystery of the Aleph: Mathematics, the Kabbalah, and the Search for Infinity by Amir D. Aczel

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English (14)  Italian (1)  All languages (15)
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
I abandoned this book at least a decade ago, after reading only one chapter. It's a topic that I'm extremely interested in, but I just don't have a use for a book on this topic that's almost entirely without references. Flipping through the first chapter now in an attempt to remember why I found it so disappointing, this sentence stood out: "A great tribute to the Pythagoreans' intellectual achievements is the fact that they deduced the special place of the number 10 from an abstract mathematical argument rather than from counting the fingers on two hands." This seems pretty speculative; I can't help wondering whether the justification might have come *after* the idea that ten was special.
  _Zoe_ | Jul 7, 2021 |
Interesting, or a caution of staring into infinity. ( )
  micahammon | Dec 19, 2020 |
About the mathematical development of infinity. A few irrelevant bits about the Kabbalah jammed in, sillyness. Otherwise mildly interesting- Then stupidly stopped mid-stream after the end of the work of Kanter.

Overall a stupid book written on behalf of a publisher ( )
  GirlMeetsTractor | Mar 22, 2020 |
An interesting history of people and ideas that I really wish were better written. I found the writing stripped down and formulaic, which is too bad since the topic itself seems filled with interesting possibilities. ( )
  23Goatboy23 | Jan 17, 2020 |
Didn't quite get all of this, but now I understand why ' infinities ' are a problem when the show up ( and the difference between potential and actual infinity ) ( )
  Baku-X | Jan 10, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
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From the end of the 19th century until his death, one of history's most brilliant mathematicians languished in an asylum. The Mystery of the Aleph tells the story of Georg Cantor (1845-1918), a Russian-born German who created set theory, the concept of infinite numbers, and the "continuum hypothesis," which challenged the very foundations of mathematics. His ideas brought expected denunciation from established corners - he was called a "corruptor of youth" not only for his work in mathematics, but for his larger attempts to meld spirituality and science.

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