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The Duke's Daughter (1951)

by Angela Thirkell

Series: Barsetshire Books (20)

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1472141,832 (4.13)19
Several of our favourite characters reappear to play sometimes crucial roles: Lady Norton, the Dreadful Dowager; Gradka of the Mixo-Lydians; the obnoxious Harvey siblings; and the appallingly accident prone Mrs Updike. Lady Norton calls upon recently married Lucy Adams after a nine finger exercise determines that congratulations may be in order. Gradka, now Mixo-Lydian Ambassadress is instrumental (with Maria Lufton) in routing Miss Harvey's matrimonial assault on Oliver Marling. She also helps to rescue Tom Grantly from his ill-advised venture into the clutches of Geoffrey Harvey and the Red Tape Office. Oliver is frightened out of his 'habit' of love for Jessica Dean and perennial unclehood into a real attachment for Maria. Charles Belton and Clarissa Graham advance from 'understanding' to engagement, Tom and Emmy Graham, united in 'cow-mindedness', follow suit as do Lady Cora (the Duke's daughter) and Cecil Waring; all within a twenty four hour period.… (more)
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Angela Thirkell wrote a series of Barsetshire novels that pick up several years after Anthony Trollope's Chronicles of Barsetshire. She is true to Trollope's form while demonstrating her own style. The Duke's Daughter is one of the later novels in the series, and I've only read one other, which took place much earlier. Each book theoretically stands on its own; however, reading The Duke's Daughter I couldn't shake the feeling that I'd missed a lot of the characters' history. And, since many of them shared surnames with Trollope characters, I became distracted trying to piece together the genealogy. Still, it was a fun read concerning several different young people who you know will ultimately pair off in a 3-wedding happy ending, but along the way there are mishaps and plenty of opportunities to make sport of the gentry. I'll definitely read more of Thirkell's novels, but I'll start nearer the beginning next time. ( )
  lauralkeet | Dec 13, 2013 |
One of a series set in amodern version of Trollope's Barsetshire; my father liked them. I inherited them but have not read them, though I like Trollope's Barset novels.
  antiquary | Oct 7, 2013 |
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Deep as had been the county's interest in the marriage of Mr. Adams the wealthy ironmaster and Lucy Marling, daughter of old Squire Marling, even deeper was its curiosity about their future.
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Marigold burst into the kitchen with something black in her hand. ... "Ow, Mrs Allen, it's my new black cami-knicks," said Marigold, brandishing a garment of black sateen edged with lace of the revolting colour known in lingerie circles as ecru. "I got them cheap off one of the usherettes at the Barchester Odeon." ... "Now don't be so silly, Marigold", said Lady Cora. "And if you want cami-knickers you'd better get pink ones. The girls that wear black never get the star parts."
"If ever I marry," said Lady Cora, "my husband will have to beat the boys and I shall send the girls to bed. And when they grow up they will all boast to their children about it."
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Several of our favourite characters reappear to play sometimes crucial roles: Lady Norton, the Dreadful Dowager; Gradka of the Mixo-Lydians; the obnoxious Harvey siblings; and the appallingly accident prone Mrs Updike. Lady Norton calls upon recently married Lucy Adams after a nine finger exercise determines that congratulations may be in order. Gradka, now Mixo-Lydian Ambassadress is instrumental (with Maria Lufton) in routing Miss Harvey's matrimonial assault on Oliver Marling. She also helps to rescue Tom Grantly from his ill-advised venture into the clutches of Geoffrey Harvey and the Red Tape Office. Oliver is frightened out of his 'habit' of love for Jessica Dean and perennial unclehood into a real attachment for Maria. Charles Belton and Clarissa Graham advance from 'understanding' to engagement, Tom and Emmy Graham, united in 'cow-mindedness', follow suit as do Lady Cora (the Duke's daughter) and Cecil Waring; all within a twenty four hour period.

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