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The Color Purple by Alice Walker
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The Color Purple (original 1982; edition 2004)

by Alice Walker (Author)

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16,026285232 (4.13)613
As a young, black woman living in 1930s Georgia, Celie faces constant violence and oppression. She survives the brutality of incest before being married off to "Mr.," who routinely abuses her both physically and emotionally. Eventually, Celie develops a deep bond with her husband's mistress Shug, and it is through this relationship that she understands she is a woman capable of being loved and respected.… (more)
Member:MyOwnWorld
Title:The Color Purple
Authors:Alice Walker (Author)
Info:Phoenix (2004), Edition: New Ed, 272 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Color Purple by Alice Walker (1982)

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» See also 613 mentions

English (277)  Swedish (2)  Italian (2)  Hungarian (1)  Vietnamese (1)  Dutch (1)  French (1)  German (1)  All languages (286)
Showing 1-5 of 277 (next | show all)
Nobody needs me to review this classic, but I'm so happy and grateful Alice Walker wrote this book. It speaks directly to your heart, it's brilliantly written and structured, and it is very moving and wise. Its main theme is recovery from (mostly domestic or sexual) violence, abuse, control, and unfairness, but also so much more, its theme is simply life, and people, and love. It's set during the period of 1909-1949, in black communities in the American South, in the music scene, in England, on ships, and in the jungles of Africa. Vivid characters that stay with you, different perspectives, and something quite rare in books: without preaching a particular message, this book feels like a force of good working in you, opening your heart. Absolutely deserving of the Pulitzer, what a wonderful novel. ( )
  Evamaren | Sep 12, 2020 |
I found the hardest part turned out to be the best part, looking past grammatical and syntax errors to understand this is how they spoke and communicated at that time in that place. I can see why this book won awards because it broke a lot of rules but carried the story very well. I'm still cheering for the main character who overcame a lot. ( )
  bdinsman | Sep 10, 2020 |
A magnificent exploration into identity (race, gender, culture, heritage), using a literary narrative that borders on sentimentality but stays intelligent enough to work throughout. Ambitious, weighty and well structured. ( )
  ephemeral_future | Aug 20, 2020 |
This is a hard book to read. I first picked it up when I was 18 (oh fuuuck, that was 5 years ago, where did the time go) and couldn’t get more than a few pages in because of the disturbing subject matter. But now I’m older and more experienced, I can say it’s a really beautiful and important book, and I respect the hell out of the woman who gave it to me for free all those years ago because she believed every girl should read it.

It’s the story of Celie, an African American lesbian in the 1920s who went through awful things. She lived in a deeply racist society, she was raped and abused by her father, her children were taken from her, she was forced to marry a much older man who also raped and abused her, and she was expected to be a mother/servant to his children, who were barely younger than her. But her life started to look up when she met Shug, her husband’s mistress. Instead of hating each other like one would expect, Shug and Celie showed each other kindness and became friends, then lovers, then life partners. As she grew older, Celie got stronger, braver and more independent and eventually ended up living a life she was happy with. ( )
  elusiverica | Aug 15, 2020 |
This book was excellent! The format of letters between sisters worked well to convey each of their stories (and the difference in education between them). The female characters, primary focus of the novel, are wonderful. Walker’s novel earns its praise. ( )
  meaqhan | Jul 26, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 277 (next | show all)
Walker accomplishes a rare thing: She makes an epistolary novel work without veering into preciousness. Rather, Celie's full-bodied voice emerges, a moody and honest voice, in an inherently intimate literary form.
 
Without doubt, Alice Walker's latest novel is her most impressive. No mean accomplishment, since her previous books - which, in addition to several collections of poetry and two collections of short stories, include two novels ("The Third Life of Grange Copeland" and "Medridian") - have elicited almost unanimous praise for Miss Walker as a lavishly gifted writer
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Walker, Aliceprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dam, Irma vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Juva, KerstiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
"Show me how to do like you. Show how to do it." -Stevie Wonder
Dedication
To the Spirit:
Without whose assistance
Neither this book
Nor I
Would have been
Written.
First words
You better not never tell nobody but God. It'd kill your mammy.
Quotations
Time moves slowly, but passes quickly.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
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As a young, black woman living in 1930s Georgia, Celie faces constant violence and oppression. She survives the brutality of incest before being married off to "Mr.," who routinely abuses her both physically and emotionally. Eventually, Celie develops a deep bond with her husband's mistress Shug, and it is through this relationship that she understands she is a woman capable of being loved and respected.

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Book description
Tells the story of two African-American sisters: Nettie, a missionary in Africa, and Celie, a child-wife living in the south, in the medium of their letters to each other and in Celie's case, the desperate letters she begins, "Dear God."
Haiku summary
A woman's tale
on the politics of black
Georgia, 1930s, grit, faith
survival - told from the heart

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