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I Want to Die but I Want to Eat Tteokbokki: the South Korean hit therapy…

by Baek Sehee

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982248,328 (3.07)1
The South Korean runaway bestseller, debut author Baek Sehee's intimate therapy memoir, as recommended by BTS. PSYCHIATRIST: So how can I help you? ME: I don't know, I'm - what's the word - depressed? Do I have to go into detail? Baek Sehee is a successful young social media director at a publishing house when she begins seeing a psychiatrist about her - what to call it? - depression? She feels persistently low, anxious, endlessly self-doubting, but also highly judgmental of others. She hides her feelings well at work and with friends, performing the calmness her lifestyle demands. The effort is exhausting, overwhelming, and keeps her from forming deep relationships. This can't be normal. But if she's so hopeless, why can she always summon a yen for her favorite street food: the hot, spicy rice cake, tteokbokki? Is this just what life is like? Recording her dialogues with her psychiatrist over a twelve-week period, and expanding on each session with her own reflective micro-essays, Baek begins to disentangle the feedback loops, knee-jerk reactions, and harmful behaviors that keep her locked in a cycle of self-abuse. Part memoir, part self-help book, I Want to Die but I Want to Eat Tteokbokki is a book to keep close and to reach for in times of darkness. It will appeal to anyone who has ever felt alone or unjustified in their everyday despair.… (more)
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A quick read, and while I understand the author's intent, it seemed too simple and almost meaningless. ( )
  bookwyrmm | Jan 12, 2023 |
One woman's account of going to therapy to get help for the low grade depression she's lived with for a large part of her life. Told in part in transcripts of the therapy sessions, in part in short texts exploring the topics covered in the sessions.

Some of this was very relatable, some not at all. In the end there was nothing all that revelatory about this book, but it wan't bad either. I guess I just didn't end up getting all that much out of it.

One slightly frustrating thing about this was the final sentence of the book, which pretty much shows that the author still hangs on to the one way of thinking that the therapy sessions came back to time and time again, which is thinking in black and white. ( )
  tuusannuuska | Dec 1, 2022 |
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The South Korean runaway bestseller, debut author Baek Sehee's intimate therapy memoir, as recommended by BTS. PSYCHIATRIST: So how can I help you? ME: I don't know, I'm - what's the word - depressed? Do I have to go into detail? Baek Sehee is a successful young social media director at a publishing house when she begins seeing a psychiatrist about her - what to call it? - depression? She feels persistently low, anxious, endlessly self-doubting, but also highly judgmental of others. She hides her feelings well at work and with friends, performing the calmness her lifestyle demands. The effort is exhausting, overwhelming, and keeps her from forming deep relationships. This can't be normal. But if she's so hopeless, why can she always summon a yen for her favorite street food: the hot, spicy rice cake, tteokbokki? Is this just what life is like? Recording her dialogues with her psychiatrist over a twelve-week period, and expanding on each session with her own reflective micro-essays, Baek begins to disentangle the feedback loops, knee-jerk reactions, and harmful behaviors that keep her locked in a cycle of self-abuse. Part memoir, part self-help book, I Want to Die but I Want to Eat Tteokbokki is a book to keep close and to reach for in times of darkness. It will appeal to anyone who has ever felt alone or unjustified in their everyday despair.

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