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Monsters in Greek Literature (Routledge…
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Monsters in Greek Literature (Routledge Monographs in Classical Studies) (edition 2021)

by Fiona Mitchell (Author)

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"Monsters in Greek literature are often thought of as creatures which exist in epic narratives, however, as this book shows, they appear in a much broader range of ancient sources and are used in creation narratives, ethnographic texts, and biology to explore the limits of the human body and of the human world. This book provides an in-depth examination of the role of monstrosity in ancient Greek literature. In the past, monsters in this context have largely been treated as unimportant or analysed on an individual basis. By focusing on genres rather than single creatures, the book provides a greater understanding of how monstrosity and abnormal bodies are used in ancient sources. Very often ideas about monstrosity are used as a contrast against which to examine the nature of what it is to be human, both physically and behaviourally. This book focuses on creation narratives, ethnographic writing, and biological texts. These three genres address the origins of the human world, its spatial limits, and the nature of the human body; by examining monstrosity in these genres we can see the way Greek texts construct the space and time in which people exist and the nature of our bodies. This book is aimed primarily at scholars and students undertaking research, not only those with an interest in monstrosity, but also scholars exploring cultural representations of time (especially the primordial and mythological past), ancient geography and ethnography, and ancient philosophy and science. As the representation of monsters in antiquity was strongly influential on medieval, renaissance, and early modern images and texts, this book would also be relevant to people researching these areas"--… (more)
Member:Labrys
Title:Monsters in Greek Literature (Routledge Monographs in Classical Studies)
Authors:Fiona Mitchell (Author)
Info:Routledge (2021), Edition: 1, 210 pages
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Monsters in Greek Literature (Routledge Monographs in Classical Studies) by Fiona Mitchell

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Fiona Mitchell has produced a helpful study on monsters in some foundational texts in Greek literature. Mitchell is aware of the relevance this topic has to historians of Greek culture as well as its cachet in popular culture. Beyond her helpful introduction, however, the monograph focuses on the literature specified in her subtitle. Nevertheless, the discussion she engenders is clearly meant to contribute to a wider conversation happening among ancient historians for whom the monster is a common motif.
 
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"Monsters in Greek literature are often thought of as creatures which exist in epic narratives, however, as this book shows, they appear in a much broader range of ancient sources and are used in creation narratives, ethnographic texts, and biology to explore the limits of the human body and of the human world. This book provides an in-depth examination of the role of monstrosity in ancient Greek literature. In the past, monsters in this context have largely been treated as unimportant or analysed on an individual basis. By focusing on genres rather than single creatures, the book provides a greater understanding of how monstrosity and abnormal bodies are used in ancient sources. Very often ideas about monstrosity are used as a contrast against which to examine the nature of what it is to be human, both physically and behaviourally. This book focuses on creation narratives, ethnographic writing, and biological texts. These three genres address the origins of the human world, its spatial limits, and the nature of the human body; by examining monstrosity in these genres we can see the way Greek texts construct the space and time in which people exist and the nature of our bodies. This book is aimed primarily at scholars and students undertaking research, not only those with an interest in monstrosity, but also scholars exploring cultural representations of time (especially the primordial and mythological past), ancient geography and ethnography, and ancient philosophy and science. As the representation of monsters in antiquity was strongly influential on medieval, renaissance, and early modern images and texts, this book would also be relevant to people researching these areas"--

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