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Open source provides the competitive advantage in the Internet Age. According to the August Forrester Report, 56 percent of IT managers interviewed at Global 2,500 companies are already using some type of open source software in their infrastructure and another 6 percent will install it in the next two years. This revolutionary model for collaborative software development is being embraced and studied by many of the biggest players in the high-tech industry, from Sun Microsystems to IBM to Intel.The Cathedral & the Bazaar is a must for anyone who cares about the future of the computer industry or the dynamics of the information economy. Already, billions of dollars have been made and lost based on the ideas in this book. Its conclusions will be studied, debated, and implemented for years to come. According to Bob Young, "This is Eric Raymond's great contribution to the success of the open source revolution, to the adoption of Linux-based operating systems, and to the success of open source users and the companies that supply them."The interest in open source software development has grown enormously in the past year. This revised and expanded paperback edition includes new material on open source developments in 1999 and 2000. Raymond's clear and effective writing style accurately describing the benefits of open source software has been key to its success. With major vendors creating acceptance for open source within companies, independent vendors will become the open source story in 2001.… (more)
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The Cathedral and the Bazaar : Musings on Linux and Open Source by an Accidental Revolutionary by Eric S. Raymond (Author)

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» See also 4 mentions

English (13)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (14)
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
I enjoyed reading this more then I expected at first, given its age. The initial essay was really good and the highlight of the book. The essay in the middle was a little to academically analytical for casual reading, but would be quite interesting if doing research on the open source community. The last essay was a nice general narrative of Eric Raymond's experience since writing the initial essay. ( )
  cypher2048 | Dec 28, 2020 |
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Table of Contents
Foreword (Bob Young)
1. Why You Should Care
2. A Brief History of Hackerdom
3. The Cathedral and the Bazaar
4. Homesteading the Noosphere
5. The Magic Cauldron
6. The Revenge of the Hackers
7. Author's Afterword: Beyond Software?
Appendix: How To Become a Hacker
Appendix to The Magic Cauldron
Notes and Acknowledgements ( )
  knoba | Oct 12, 2020 |
If you are interested in the roots of open source, this is a great read. The book is a collection of essays, with The Cathedral and the Bazaar being the best essay by far. The Brief History of Hackerdom + Revenge of the Hackers are interesting historical accounts; Appendix A is instructional for the clueless (and a pleasant refresher for the “part-time” hacker). The rest is, for the most part, an exposé into the hacker culture and is definitely worth reading.

A grain of salt. Some of the conclusions the author makes seem to be problematic, at least in my opinion. The author often compares the hacker community to the academic research community, but fails to follow one of the key requirements in science, which is to question one's results. Consider this: "Having established that prestige is central to the hacker culture's reward mechanisms, we now need to understand..." (p. 89) - this follows a section where the author actually *fails* to find evidence directly supporting his proposition: "many hackers ... show a strong reluctance to admit that their behavior was motivated by a desire for peer repute..." (p. 88). In academia, we would not state that our subject "failed to admit" something - because that implies that we know for a fact that our subject is "guilty", which begs the question: why even ask the subject? Why bother with doing research?

However, this is not a research paper - so what’s the big deal? To me, here’s the big issue: the author repeatedly refers to himself as an ethnographer, mentions qualitative research method, speaks of developing and testing theories, and makes frequent references to a variety of concepts from the social sciences. As a result, the essays read more like research reports, which we expect to be impartial accounts supported by systematically collected and analyzed data. Which is not really the case here.

That said, the essays offer useful insights, as well as memorable one-liners - such as "smart data structures and dumb code works a lot better than the other way around" or “every good work of software starts by scratching a developer's personal itch” - which are a delight to read for any programmer. ( )
  lotw | Jan 19, 2014 |
Interesting mind set for surrounding global commitment over any Corporate folks vs. huge Community - This is for sure a kind of new 'Business Model' to learn !

Thursday, Dec 16 2010 ( )
  Fouad_Bendris | Dec 25, 2012 |
An internal hacker's history of the rise of open source software and Linux, presented as a series of essays. At times prophetic, at other times quite dated. Only made it through half of the essays before losing it while traveling in Finland (i.e., releasing it open source). ( )
  albertgoldfain | Oct 9, 2010 |
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Raymond, Eric S.Authorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Young, BobForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
浩生, 山形Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Open source provides the competitive advantage in the Internet Age. According to the August Forrester Report, 56 percent of IT managers interviewed at Global 2,500 companies are already using some type of open source software in their infrastructure and another 6 percent will install it in the next two years. This revolutionary model for collaborative software development is being embraced and studied by many of the biggest players in the high-tech industry, from Sun Microsystems to IBM to Intel.The Cathedral & the Bazaar is a must for anyone who cares about the future of the computer industry or the dynamics of the information economy. Already, billions of dollars have been made and lost based on the ideas in this book. Its conclusions will be studied, debated, and implemented for years to come. According to Bob Young, "This is Eric Raymond's great contribution to the success of the open source revolution, to the adoption of Linux-based operating systems, and to the success of open source users and the companies that supply them."The interest in open source software development has grown enormously in the past year. This revised and expanded paperback edition includes new material on open source developments in 1999 and 2000. Raymond's clear and effective writing style accurately describing the benefits of open source software has been key to its success. With major vendors creating acceptance for open source within companies, independent vendors will become the open source story in 2001.

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