HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Three Mughal Poets

by Ralph Russell (Translator), Khurshidul Islam (Translator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
22None779,594 (3)None
The three great poets presented in this volume - Mir, Mir Hasan and Sauda - lived in Delhi, or in its general vicinity, in the eighteenth century during a time of widespread violence and disaster. The Mughal Empire was crumbling and disintegrating internally as the great feudal nobles foughtamong themselves for control of the emperor. In this atmosphere of misery, demoralization, and despair occurred the first major flowering of Urdu literature.Sauda, the first to be discussed, wrote poems in all the main classical forms, but he was an unequalled satirist in an age that cried for satire, and it is that portion of his work that is considered here.Mir Hasan also was born in Delhi and probably lived there until after the occupation, massacre, and looting of 1739, which occurred when he was about fourteen. Like his two contmporaries, he wrote in all the classical forms and excelled in one, to which he devoted most of his effort. In his caseit was the mansavi, a long narrative poem in rhymed couplets often telling a love story.Mir, perhaps the greatest of the three, is, in the opinion of the authors, one of the great love poems of world literature. His favourite form was the ghazal, a subtle and difficult one which the authors discuss in detail, giving numerous examples.In presenting these Mughal poets, the authors have let the literature speak for itself wherever possible, adding a minimum of comment.(This is a paperback edition of the earlier hardback published in 1991.)… (more)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Russell, RalphTranslatorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Islam, KhurshidulTranslatormain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

The three great poets presented in this volume - Mir, Mir Hasan and Sauda - lived in Delhi, or in its general vicinity, in the eighteenth century during a time of widespread violence and disaster. The Mughal Empire was crumbling and disintegrating internally as the great feudal nobles foughtamong themselves for control of the emperor. In this atmosphere of misery, demoralization, and despair occurred the first major flowering of Urdu literature.Sauda, the first to be discussed, wrote poems in all the main classical forms, but he was an unequalled satirist in an age that cried for satire, and it is that portion of his work that is considered here.Mir Hasan also was born in Delhi and probably lived there until after the occupation, massacre, and looting of 1739, which occurred when he was about fourteen. Like his two contmporaries, he wrote in all the classical forms and excelled in one, to which he devoted most of his effort. In his caseit was the mansavi, a long narrative poem in rhymed couplets often telling a love story.Mir, perhaps the greatest of the three, is, in the opinion of the authors, one of the great love poems of world literature. His favourite form was the ghazal, a subtle and difficult one which the authors discuss in detail, giving numerous examples.In presenting these Mughal poets, the authors have let the literature speak for itself wherever possible, adding a minimum of comment.(This is a paperback edition of the earlier hardback published in 1991.)

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,498,129 books! | Top bar: Always visible