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Angeline

by Anna Quinn

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272868,765 (3.5)None
Fiction. Literature. HTML:

A moving, lyrical, melancholy, and spiritual novel by the acclaimed author of The Night Child, in which Sister Angeline, unwillingly sent to a radical convent and confronting her tragic past, asks the deep question, follow your heart or follow the rules?

After surviving a tragedy that killed her entire family, sixteen-year-old Meg joins a cloistered convent, believing it is her life's work to pray full time for the suffering of others. Taking the name Sister Angeline, she spends her days and nights in silence, moving from one prayerful hour to the next. She prays for the hardships of others, the sick and poor, the loved ones she lost, and her own atonement.

When the Archdiocese of Chicago runs out of money to keep the convent open, she is torn from her carefully constructed life and sent to a progressive convent on a rocky island in the Pacific Northwest. There, at the Light of the Sea, five radical feminist nuns have their own vision of faithful service. They do not follow canonical law, they do not live a cloistered life, and they believe in using their voices for change.

As Sister Angeline struggles to adapt to her new home, she must navigate her grief, fears, and confusions, while being drawn into the lives of a child in crisis, an angry teen, an EMT suffering survivor's guilt, and the parish priest who is losing his congregation to the Sisters' all-inclusive Sunday masses. Through all of this, something seems to have awakened in her, a healing power she has not experienced in years that could be her saving grace, or her downfall.

In Angeline, novelist Anna Quinn explores the complexity of our past selves and the discovery of our present truth; the enduring imprints left by our losses, forgiveness and acceptance, and why we believe what we believe. Affecting and beautifully told, Angeline is both poignant and startling and will touch the hearts of anyone who has ever asked themselves: When your foundations crumble and you've lost yourself, how do you find the strength to go on? Do you follow your heart or the rules?

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Showing 2 of 2
February 7, 2023
NetGalley
Blackstone Publishing
350 pages
Fiction, digital, audio, literature, spiritual, religious
4/5
6/26/23-6/28/23

In 2014, after a tragic accident which killed her family, 16 year-old Megan finds herself alone. Her parents, although working professionals, were alcoholics who died in the tragedy along with her sick brother. Not knowing where to go or how to deal with her guilt and grief, she joins a convent where she chooses the religious name Sister Angeline after a saint.

Coincidently, the real Sister Angelina was orphaned at age 6 and raised by her grandparents who married her off at 15 years-old. When he died 2 years later she made the decision to dedicate her life to God. Her experiences might serve as a reference to that of Angeline in that she had lived in cloistered and un-cloistered communities with the goal of serving the poor and sick in their society.

Sister Angeline lived with 20 other nuns in an oath of silence except for 1-hour a day of conversation. The convent fell under the jurisdiction of the Archdiocese of Chicago who is unable to provide the financial support to maintain the convent. Sister Angeline is then uprooted from her structured, conventional schedule to live at the Light of the Sea in the Pacific Northwest. She has difficulty transitioning as this is a group of radical, unconventional nuns in this un-cloistered convent run by five feminist sisters. The culture shock is more than she was prepared and finds herself praying for strength among these women who have abandoned the traditional clothing of religious order. While there she learns more about herself and her mission to help people as well as discover her own powers of healing.

This is a poignant story of the resilience, courage and renewal of the human spirit. This book is more religious and spiritual in nature than I expected which was fine for me. It may not be a good read for people who have fixed religious beliefs or steer clear of spiritual, religious themed stories.

Many thanks to NetGalley and Blackstone Publishing for allowing me access to read this digital book. My review is my honest and unbiased opinion. All comments are expressly my own. ( )
  marquis784 | Mar 27, 2024 |
Unique



Angeline's presence will seep into your mind and soul as you turn the pages of this captivating novel. It starts with a slow burn but quickly gains momentum, keeping you engrossed until the powerful ending engulfs you and then gently retreats. The characters are meticulously crafted, and their backgrounds are brilliantly constructed, captivating your attention, and refusing to let go.

The author's vivid details and descriptions transport you to a small island in the Pacific Northwest, where the air carries a tangy salt scent and the community relies on one another for everything.

Sister Angeline has spent the past seven years at the cloistered convent of the Daughters of Mercy in Chicago. However, when the Archdiocese of Chicago faces financial difficulties, the nuns are forced to find new places to go. Angeline is sent to the Light of the Sea convent on a tiny island, a stark contrast to the bustling noise of Chicago and the life she knew. The nuns on the island have a more laid-back approach, championing marches for good and conducting their own Sunday services. As Angeline slowly adapts to her new surroundings, she discovers a deep love for these remarkable women and the land that embraces them. This newfound connection grounds her and allows her to confront the haunting memories of losing her family at the age of sixteen, a burden that has weighed heavily on her every single day for the past seven years. Meanwhile, a storm begins to churn the waters around the island, culminating in a breathtaking conclusion that will leave tears welling in your eyes as miracles unfold before your very eyes.

This book is a truly unique reading experience, unlike anything I have encountered before. It possesses a power, evocativeness, and mastery of writing that gradually draws you in, compelling you to empathize with and alleviate the pain of every character you encounter. I extend my gratitude to NetGalley for providing me with a copy of this extraordinary book. ( )
  b00kdarling87 | Jan 7, 2024 |
Showing 2 of 2
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Fiction. Literature. HTML:

A moving, lyrical, melancholy, and spiritual novel by the acclaimed author of The Night Child, in which Sister Angeline, unwillingly sent to a radical convent and confronting her tragic past, asks the deep question, follow your heart or follow the rules?

After surviving a tragedy that killed her entire family, sixteen-year-old Meg joins a cloistered convent, believing it is her life's work to pray full time for the suffering of others. Taking the name Sister Angeline, she spends her days and nights in silence, moving from one prayerful hour to the next. She prays for the hardships of others, the sick and poor, the loved ones she lost, and her own atonement.

When the Archdiocese of Chicago runs out of money to keep the convent open, she is torn from her carefully constructed life and sent to a progressive convent on a rocky island in the Pacific Northwest. There, at the Light of the Sea, five radical feminist nuns have their own vision of faithful service. They do not follow canonical law, they do not live a cloistered life, and they believe in using their voices for change.

As Sister Angeline struggles to adapt to her new home, she must navigate her grief, fears, and confusions, while being drawn into the lives of a child in crisis, an angry teen, an EMT suffering survivor's guilt, and the parish priest who is losing his congregation to the Sisters' all-inclusive Sunday masses. Through all of this, something seems to have awakened in her, a healing power she has not experienced in years that could be her saving grace, or her downfall.

In Angeline, novelist Anna Quinn explores the complexity of our past selves and the discovery of our present truth; the enduring imprints left by our losses, forgiveness and acceptance, and why we believe what we believe. Affecting and beautifully told, Angeline is both poignant and startling and will touch the hearts of anyone who has ever asked themselves: When your foundations crumble and you've lost yourself, how do you find the strength to go on? Do you follow your heart or the rules?

.

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