HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Redemption of Althalus by David Eddings
Loading...

The Redemption of Althalus (original 2000; edition 2001)

by David Eddings

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,205None2,927 (3.47)22
Member:talstonus
Title:The Redemption of Althalus
Authors:David Eddings
Info:Del Rey (2001), Mass Market Paperback, 800 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:Science Fiction, Fantasy

Work details

The Redemption of Althalus by David Eddings (2000)

(7) adventure (6) Althalus (8) book (5) David Eddings (14) eddings (23) epic (5) epic fantasy (11) fantasy (525) fantasy fiction (14) fiction (185) gods (19) hardcover (22) high fantasy (19) humor (5) magic (37) novel (20) own (13) paperback (11) quest (9) read (26) science fiction (9) sf (11) sff (31) speculative fiction (5) standalone (12) sword and sorcery (5) time travel (7) to-read (11) unread (14)
None
  1. 10
    The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N. K. Jemisin (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Another epic fantasy tale featuring gods
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 22 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
Abandoned. The general idea for this book was good, thief teams up with Goddess and they try to stop the minions of evil. But, the execution was poor. There were 47583 characters and the book may as well have been a play because it was so dialogue heavy. It also got very tedious them jumping to various battles through the House. And don't get me started on Emmy saying "pet" nearly every line. ( )
1 vote soliloquies | Mar 27, 2013 |
I had rated this one star, but that is unfair, as I never actually finished it... I may have another go some day. Basically, I read the first page in the store and thought it was wonderful! I bought it and took it home to read. And after the first chapter, things went downhill. I was a big Eddings fan prior to picking up this book. I read my brother's copies of The Elenium and Tamuli, and I bought my own editions of The Belgariad and The Malloreon, and The Rivan Codex, and all the supporting books... I LOVED those characters. But, when I started to read Althalus, his cat companion (sorry, it's been a while and I can't be bothered digging up the book to check her name) reminded me all too much of Polgara and, I'm afraid, that just didn't work for me. I already knew Polgara. And I had been on many adventures with her, and would gladly go on more... but not in the guise of a "different" character. It kind of reminds me of my old Furby. I played with it for a while and it was cute. Then, when I was over that, I took the batteries out. When I restarted it a few months later, it loaded a different character (but in the same body... just too weird!). I never touched the thing again... OK, so this is a reverse situation, but the point is, I couldn't deal with "Polgara" being played by some cat. Maybe, with a little more distance between me and my beloved characters, I wil be able to have a go at this one again, and give a fair rating. ( )
  Soulhaven | Mar 12, 2012 |
NIL
  rustyoldboat | May 28, 2011 |
David Eddings wrote roughly three books in his life. Unfortunately, he convinced people to publish them, over and over, with minor changes in wording and characters, and must have turned them into quite a gold mine. This book is a shorter version of the Belgariad (unlike the Mallorean, which is a version of the Belgariad with an identical length).

Here's what makes this book difficult to rate: If you don't know it's the same book as the Belgariad, it's pretty good. Probably 3.5 or 4 stars. But why give that many stars for ripping off another book?

So, I rate it low. Read the Belgariad instead, for the same experience with a fuller story. ( )
5 vote benfulton | Dec 19, 2010 |
I first read this on my way to Central America and the doorstop of a tome certainly offers plenty in the form of page count, thus making it suitable for trans-Atlantic flights, but fortunately value for money isn't the only thing on offer. The narrative is well-plotted with flickerings of humour that manage to avoid feeling strained or forced. All this results in a varied story of multiple threads that all come together in unexpected, but satisfying, ways. ( )
  Tselja | Dec 17, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
David Eddingsprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Eddings, LeighAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
John Jude PalencarCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Taylor, GeoffCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Canonical title
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Original title
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For the sisters, Lori and Lynette, who have made our lives so much more pleasant.

Thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you! ! ! ! ! !
First words
Prologue:

In defense of Althalus, it should be noted that he was in very tight financial circumstances and more than a little tipsy when he agreed to undertake the theft of the Book.
Text:

Althalus the thief spent ten days on the road down out of the mountains of Kagwher to reach the imperial city of Deika.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345440781, Mass Market Paperback)

Mythmakers and world builders of the first order, the Eddingses spin tales that make imaginations soar. Readers have thrilled to The Belgariad and The Malloreon, magic-filled masterworks chronicling the timeless conflict between good and evil. But with those sagas brought to their triumphant conclusions, fans were left hungry for more. Now at last the wait is over. With The Redemption of Althalus, the Eddingses have created their first-ever stand-alone epic fantasy . . .

It would be sheer folly to try to conceal the true nature of Althalus, for his flaws are the stuff of legend. He is, as all men know, a thief, a liar, an occasional murderer, an outrageous braggart, and a man devoid of even the slightest hint of honor.

Yet of all the men in the world, it is Althalus, unrepentant rogue and scoundrel, who will become the champion of humanity in its desperate struggle against the forces of an ancient god determined to return the universe to nothingness. On his way to steal The Book from the House at the End of the World, Althalus is confronted by a cat--a cat with eyes like emeralds, the voice of a woman, and the powers of a goddess.

She is Dweia, sister to The Gods and a greater thief even than Althalus. She must be: for in no time at all, she has stolen his heart. And more. She has stolen time itself. For when Althalus leaves the House at the End of the World, much wiser but not a day older than when he'd first entered it, thousands of years have gone by.

But Dweia is not the only one able to manipulate time. Her evil brother shares the power, and while Dweia has been teaching Althalus the secrets of The Book, the ancient God has been using the dark magic of his own Book to rewrite history. Yet all is not lost. But only if Althalus, still a thief at heart, can bring together a ragtag group of men, women, and children with no reason to trust him or each other.

Boldly written and brilliantly imagined, The Redemption of Althalus is an epic fantasy to be savored in the reading and returned to again and again for the wisdom, excitement, and humor that only the Eddingses can provide.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:36:22 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Mythmakers and world builders of the first order, the Eddingses spin tales that make imaginations soar. Readers have thrilled to The Belgariad and The Malloreon, magic-filled masterworks chronicling the timeless conflict between good and evil. But with those sagas brought to their triumphant conclusions, fans were left hungry for more. Now at last the wait is over. With The Redemption of Althalus, the Eddingses have created their first-ever stand-alone epic fantasy . . . It would be sheer folly to try to conceal the true nature of Althalus, for his flaws are the stuff of legend. He is, as all men know, a thief, a liar, an occasional murderer, an outrageous braggart, and a man devoid of even the slightest hint of honor. Yet of all the men in the world, it is Althalus, unrepentant rogue and scoundrel, who will become the champion of humanity in its desperate struggle against the forces of an ancient god determined to return the universe to nothingness. On his way to steal The Book from the House at the End of the World, Althalus is confronted by a cat--a cat with eyes like emeralds, the voice of a woman, and the powers of a goddess. She is Dweia, sister to The Gods and a greater thief even than Althalus. She must be: for in no time at all, she has stolen his heart. And more. She has stolen time itself. For when Althalus leaves the House at the End of the World, much wiser but not a day older than when he'd first entered it, thousands of years have gone by. But Dweia is not the only one able to manipulate time. Her evil brother shares the power, and while Dweia has been teaching Althalus the secrets of The Book, the ancient God has been using the dark magic of his own Book to rewrite history. Yet all is not lost. But only if Althalus, still a thief at heart, can bring together a ragtag group of men, women, and children with no reason to trust him or each other. Boldly written and brilliantly imagined, The Redemption of Althalus is an epic fantasy to be savored in the reading and returned to again and again for the wisdom, excitement, and humor that only the Eddingses can provide.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
128 avail.
10 wanted
3 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.47)
0.5 5
1 24
1.5 10
2 44
2.5 10
3 113
3.5 27
4 122
4.5 11
5 93

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 89,485,999 books! | Top bar: Always visible