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The Last Love Note

by Emma Grey

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1774156,213 (4.15)None
Fiction. Literature. Romance. Humor (Fiction.) HTML:

A December Indie Next Pick
A Book of the Month Selection
A Washington Post Noteworthy Book

You may never stop loving the one you lost. But you can still find love again.

Kate is a bit of a mess. Two years after losing her young husband Cameron, she's grieving, solo parenting, working like mad at her university fundraising job, always dropping the ball—and yet clinging to her sense of humor.

Lurching from one comedic crisis to the next, she also navigates an overbearing mom and a Tinder-obsessed best friend who's determined to matchmake Kate with her hot new neighbor.

When an in-flight problem leaves Kate and her boss, Hugh, stranded for a weekend on the east coast of Australia, she finally has a chance, away from her son, to really process her grief and see what's right in front of her. Can she let go of the love of her life and risk her heart a second time? When it becomes clear that Hugh is hiding a secret, Kate turns to the trail of scribbled notes she once used to hold her life together.

The first note captured her heart. Will the last note set it free?

The Last Love Note will make readers laugh, cry, and renew their faith in the resilience of the human heart—and in love itself.

.
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Showing 4 of 4
I went into this book a bit blindly but quickly fell in love. Kate, a widow and mom to young Charlie, navigates life after death in this perfectly springtime story about the seeds of hope that, while growing unseen for a season, finally push up from the dark soil of grief. In both the most unexpected and unassuming ways, this story is about the other side of deep-seated loss and about overcoming all the fears and vulnerabilities that come from the risks of second-chances, of life after a long, frozen winter.

Because my dad passed away from early-onset familial Alzheimer’s (like Kate’s Cam, Charlie’s dad), I tend to shy away from books where characters deal with this tragedy—however indirectly—feeling the author rarely does the disease justice. I tend to get too critical and fact-checky, internally measuring the accuracy of the author’s descriptions, as if I’m the expert. Really, I’m no more an expert than anyone else who’s watched the destruction of Alzheimer’s happen to someone they love. But I do know that Alzheimer’s isn’t a soft, slipping away inside your own mind. It’s not just becoming forgetful and losing memories. And it’s certainly not just something that happens to old people—as is often portrayed. It’s violent and messy and utterly bleak. It’s also deeply, deeply personal. If you encounter someone who has also witnessed the same devouring, it instantly connects you, tethers you to this club no one wants to be a part of.

This book captures that terrible reality and, thankfully, so much more because it certainly could’ve become too weighty. Yes, you’ll want to grab some tissues (from beginning all the way through the Author’s Note), but the true magic of this book is that the very real and gritty authenticity of Kate and Cam’s experience with this dark disease does not drown out the notes of humor and hope and heart that ultimately make this so much more uplifting than melancholic. ( )
  lizallenknapp | Apr 20, 2024 |
I went into this book a bit blindly but quickly fell in love. Kate, a widow and mom to young Charlie, navigates life after death in this perfectly springtime story about the seeds of hope that, while growing unseen for a season, finally push up from the dark soil of grief. In both the most unexpected and unassuming ways, this story is about the other side of deep-seated loss and about overcoming all the fears and vulnerabilities that come from the risks of second-chances, of life after a long, frozen winter.

Because my dad passed away from early-onset familial Alzheimer’s (like Kate’s Cam, Charlie’s dad), I tend to shy away from books where characters deal with this tragedy—however indirectly—feeling the author rarely does the disease justice. I tend to get too critical and fact-checky, internally measuring the accuracy of the author’s descriptions, as if I’m the expert. Really, I’m no more an expert than anyone else who’s watched the destruction of Alzheimer’s happen to someone they love. But I do know that Alzheimer’s isn’t a soft, slipping away inside your own mind. It’s not just becoming forgetful and losing memories. And it’s certainly not just something that happens to old people—as is often portrayed. It’s violent and messy and utterly bleak. It’s also deeply, deeply personal. If you encounter someone who has also witnessed the same devouring, it instantly connects you, tethers you to this club no one wants to be a part of.

This book captures that terrible reality and, thankfully, so much more because it certainly could’ve become too weighty. Yes, you’ll want to grab some tissues (from beginning all the way through the Author’s Note), but the true magic of this book is that the very real and gritty authenticity of Kate and Cam’s experience with this dark disease does not drown out the notes of humor and hope and heart that ultimately make this so much more uplifting than melancholic. ( )
  lizallenknapp | Apr 20, 2024 |
I didn't know anything about this book when I checked out the audio version on Libby. I just liked the Australian narrator's voice and it immediately drew me in. It was like listening to someone read their own diary. It was funny and heart wrenching and happy and devastatingly sad all at once. The story was about a middle age woman whose husband has early onset dementia and declines quickly before dying. She is left behind to raise their young son and figure out how to live a life without the love of her life. Loosely based on the author's real life experience of young widowhood, it all felt incredibly real to listen to. A bit intense at times, I was completely captivated. I gave it four stars because it was a bit repetitive and overly wrought and I had to take breaks from the intensity but otherwise loved its passion. ( )
  Tosta | Feb 16, 2024 |
Thank you to Zibby Books and the author.

I don't read reviews before reading the book so all I knew was from the back of the book about a “comedic”crisis and how she gets stranded with her boss. I wasn't expecting the plot to be what it really was in the beginning. And the light hearted cover didn't help much either. I was expecting a much lighter book.

I have mixed thoughts about this book. It wasn't a fast-paced book as I would have liked but yet it wasn't slow. I didn't dislike this book but I just can't put my finger on it and just kept reading to read it until the end. It held my interest though but yet it didn't.

I was 167 pages away from finishing it and I couldn't get through it . I knew what was going to happen in the epilogue and I was correct. So predictable. ( )
  sweetbabyjane58 | Dec 23, 2023 |
Showing 4 of 4
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Fiction. Literature. Romance. Humor (Fiction.) HTML:

A December Indie Next Pick
A Book of the Month Selection
A Washington Post Noteworthy Book

You may never stop loving the one you lost. But you can still find love again.

Kate is a bit of a mess. Two years after losing her young husband Cameron, she's grieving, solo parenting, working like mad at her university fundraising job, always dropping the ball—and yet clinging to her sense of humor.

Lurching from one comedic crisis to the next, she also navigates an overbearing mom and a Tinder-obsessed best friend who's determined to matchmake Kate with her hot new neighbor.

When an in-flight problem leaves Kate and her boss, Hugh, stranded for a weekend on the east coast of Australia, she finally has a chance, away from her son, to really process her grief and see what's right in front of her. Can she let go of the love of her life and risk her heart a second time? When it becomes clear that Hugh is hiding a secret, Kate turns to the trail of scribbled notes she once used to hold her life together.

The first note captured her heart. Will the last note set it free?

The Last Love Note will make readers laugh, cry, and renew their faith in the resilience of the human heart—and in love itself.

.

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