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Three Hundred Years Hence

by Mary Griffith

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1311,277,974 (4)2
Mary Griffith (1772-1846) was an American writer, horticulturist and scientist. Three Hundred Years Hence is the first known utopian novel by an American woman.A man falls into a deep sleep and awakens 300 years later in the Utopian states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York.Extract: "Behold our hero, then, in full health and vigour, at the ripe age of thirty-two, returning to the earth after an absence of three hundred years! Had it not been for the loss of his wife and son, and his excellent father, he surely was quite as happily circumstanced, as when, at twenty-one, he returned from Europe, unknowing and unknown. He soon made friends then, and but for the canker at his heart he could make friends again. He thought of nothing less than to appear before the public, or of engaging in any pursuit. His fortune, and that part of his father-in-law's which naturally would have fallen to him, was now in the possession of this remote descendent. He was willing to let it so remain, retaining only sufficient for his wants; and his amiable relation took care that his means were ample.To divert his mind, and keep him from brooding over his sorrows, his young relative proposed that they should travel through the different states. "Surely," said he, "you must feel a desire to see what changes three hundred years have made. Are not the people altered? Do those around you talk, and dress, and live as you were accustomed to do?"… (more)
history (1) Prime (1) science fiction (3) sf (1) to-read (1) USA (1) utopian (1) xlib (1)
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Mary Griffith (1772-1846) was an American writer, horticulturist and scientist. Three Hundred Years Hence is the first known utopian novel by an American woman.A man falls into a deep sleep and awakens 300 years later in the Utopian states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York.Extract: "Behold our hero, then, in full health and vigour, at the ripe age of thirty-two, returning to the earth after an absence of three hundred years! Had it not been for the loss of his wife and son, and his excellent father, he surely was quite as happily circumstanced, as when, at twenty-one, he returned from Europe, unknowing and unknown. He soon made friends then, and but for the canker at his heart he could make friends again. He thought of nothing less than to appear before the public, or of engaging in any pursuit. His fortune, and that part of his father-in-law's which naturally would have fallen to him, was now in the possession of this remote descendent. He was willing to let it so remain, retaining only sufficient for his wants; and his amiable relation took care that his means were ample.To divert his mind, and keep him from brooding over his sorrows, his young relative proposed that they should travel through the different states. "Surely," said he, "you must feel a desire to see what changes three hundred years have made. Are not the people altered? Do those around you talk, and dress, and live as you were accustomed to do?"

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