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How Are You Peeling?: Foods with Moods by…
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How Are You Peeling?: Foods with Moods (1999)

by Saxton Freymann (Author/Illustrator), Joost Elffers (Author/Illustrator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,0104012,770 (4.11)4
  1. 00
    The Feelings Book by Todd Parr (sweetiegherkin)
    sweetiegherkin: Very different art styles (cartoonish drawings versus photography), but both books are designed to get children thinking about the different kinds of emotions out there and naming them. The Feelings Book is a little more basic and thus better for younger audiences while How Are You Peeling? has more advanced vocabulary (and a greater depth of feelings exploration) so it's more appropriate for a slightly older audience.… (more)
  2. 00
    Today I Feel Silly: And Other Moods That Make My Day by Jamie Lee Curtis (SadieReads)
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» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
-good as uses vegetables to show emotions, bit of humour ( )
  fern_grenon | Jan 7, 2019 |
How Are You Peeling? is a vibrant and engaging text that strives to teach emotional intelligence. The book discusses different scenarios and feelings that could be associated with them. The book is vibrantly illustrated with food sculptures done by the author. The illustrations help to show what these emotions could look like but helps to make a seemingly serious topic lively and fun. One quote I like from the text is "Do you let your feelings show? Who do you love? How do they know?" I think books like this are so important because developing a sense of emotional intelligence and self reflection is so important for everyone and How Are You Peeling? does it in a silly and child friendly way. ( )
  kfalls1 | Sep 13, 2018 |
students can identify feeling and express how they feel
  aaj018 | Nov 8, 2017 |
This book is about a whole bunch of fruit and vegetable making funny face with their own unique expression. I like this book because it funny and lift up the mood of people. Will use it on my class once in while to make students laugh while copy the expression of those fruit and vegetable. It suitable for grade k-6.
  HsaRay | May 4, 2017 |
Very informative book, good for young children.
  zaspelaa | Apr 13, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Freymann, SaxtonAuthor/Illustratorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Elffers, JoostAuthor/Illustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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For Mia, Eyck, Finn, and Elodie, with love beyond words and vegetables S.F.
For Oekie and in memory of Afrie Jansma. Early on the Jansma family showed me the world of play. J.E.
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How are you feeling?
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Book description
This book about feelings has some of the coolest illustrations ever! As the narration asks you about your moods and emotions, the feelings are illustrated by pictures of fruits and vegetables. Saxton Freymann used real fruits and vegetable, modifying them just enough to add eyes (black-eyed peas) and mouths (carvings or beet juice) in order to create facial expressions for each emotion. The effect is incredible! The "face" to a great job showing emotions ranging from happiness to anger, relief to jealousy. Children and adults alike will be amazed.

If you liked this story, you may also enjoy "Today I Feel Silly" by Jamie Lee Curtis. It is also a children's book about feelings.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0439598419, Paperback)

Who hasn't looked at a fruit or vegetable and seen a funny face? In How Are You Peeling?--by the creator of the whimsical Play with Your Food--the "natural personalities" of produce are enhanced with black-eyed pea eyes and the occasional carved mouth--then photographed in vivid colors. One page reveals a wistful-looking poblano pepper being comforted by a cheerful red tomato, while another shows the amused, confused, frustrated, and surprised expressions of a green pepper, red pepper, orange, and apple. Adults and children alike will marvel at the range of expressions these fruits and vegetables possess--did you know just how many faces a kiwi could have? With simple rhymed text describing the emotions ("How are you when friends drop by?/ With someone new... a little shy?"), this appealing picture book is bound to spark discussion with young children. Parents can use it to talk about different emotions or to help children to identify and articulate their mood of the moment. Adults will just plain be amused. (Click to see a sample spread. Copyright 1999 by Play with Your Food, LLC. Used by permission of Scholastic Inc.) (Ages 2 to 6) --Richard Farr

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:00:48 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Brief text and photographs of carvings made from vegetables introduce the world of emotions by presenting leading questions such as "Are you feeling angry?"

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